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Trash to Treasure: curbside broken coffee table legs to:

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Forum: Trash to TreasureReplies: 73, Views: 1,801
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seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2009
3:12 PM

Post #6461240

Found these falling off of a curbside coffee table that was falling apart

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seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2009
3:13 PM

Post #6461250

ran a little hole making bit into the tops, primed, painted, then rubbed stain on, and then back off to make these chunky candle holders:

This message was edited Apr 25, 2009 9:14 AM

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seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2009
3:15 PM

Post #6461258

with the candles:

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kimarj
(Kim) Philadelphi, PA
(Zone 6a)

April 25, 2009
3:19 PM

Post #6461277

Kewl!!!
staceysmom
(GayLynn) Appleton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 25, 2009
4:52 PM

Post #6461594

Those are great! Also love the area where you photographed them. What is that growing between your steppers? Beautiful.
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2009
5:53 PM

Post #6461820

Thanks, it is dichondra :0)...evergreen and no mowing

we used it to replace our lawn, too
staceysmom
(GayLynn) Appleton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 25, 2009
7:05 PM

Post #6462022

Thanks. I kind of thought that's what it was. I use the dichondra silver falls in a lot of hanging baskets. I'll have to give it a try between my pavers too.
I'm now also on the look-out for some big chunky table legs like that too... I have the perfect spot for them. Great job.
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2009
7:12 PM

Post #6462054

thank you :0)
greyma
Mukwonago, WI

April 25, 2009
11:30 PM

Post #6462953

seedpicker,
like staceysmom I love the dichondra! (oh yeah the candle sticks too!). staceysmom, do you think it'll survive winters here in WI?
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 26, 2009
12:33 AM

Post #6463199

OMG, I wondered what this weed was - thanks for ID'ing it for me - it is a horrid WEED here in my yard!!!

Those candle sticks are really nice - they would look great on your patio, lit up at night.
staceysmom
(GayLynn) Appleton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 26, 2009
1:15 AM

Post #6463365

greyma, I was wondering about that too. I'm betting it won't. I think it's a fast grower though and would probably fill in quickly. I may just have to give it a try in an area and see how it performs. I really like the look.
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2009
1:20 AM

Post #6463377

kayjones-
just like one man's trash is another mans treasure, one man's weed, is another mans favorite groundcover!
:0)

California has more dichondra lawns than grass... it is evergreen, no mowing, and tough as nails and xeriscape...not to mention pretty in mass...what more could you ask for??
-T
Lenjo
Mount Angel, OR
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2009
1:44 AM

Post #6463452

Some people have all the luck. LOL Those are quite a find, Taylor.

Joann
KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 26, 2009
8:44 AM

Post #6464307

Not to steal the thunder from your thread, T, but does this groundcover choke out other plants - will it hurt to let it grow in the flower beds? It is so hard to pull out - it is segmented and breaks off, leaving the roots.
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2009
2:29 PM

Post #6465054

hi Joann! :0)

KJ-no problem. I don't mind. I like the dichondra better than the candlesticks, too, lol..so don't mind talking about it. :0)

you are right about pulling on it...not effective. I have wanted to transplant patches before, and found out the same thing. Now I just use a little trowel or something, and pop the entire section out of the ground.

I don't think it would choke things out, in the way that ivy might crawl up and onto other things, or grow so densely that it would choke things out, but it will tangle with other grouncovers. I've tried to pull up grass, and let the dichondra win, but usually the grass ends up pulling the dichondra with it, since they've both grown around each other.

If you want a llittle groundcover in a flower bed, I'd suggest something else, like those little veronicas('georgia blue', or the even smaller 'new century') that are both prostrate, and bloom.

Stepables.com is a great resource for grouncover alternatives, but dichondra (l think) looks best all on its own...in mass. For example, the entire lawns of it, or between pavers, or even just seeding it under a tree in the patch where nothing else will grow, but haven't really seen it used, and liked in flower beds.

So, to answer your question, I'd remove it from your flower beds. If you want to try it somewhere, maybe transplant the patches you remove.

Here is a picture of some kenilworth ivy(cymbalaria). It is a cute little groundcover, but it WILL start to climb up onto things...

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seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2009
2:31 PM

Post #6465067

mazus reptans is another one I like a lot, but requires a bit of water in summer. It would be great under a rose

My favorite companion for under a rose, though is walker's low catmint


mazus;

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KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 26, 2009
3:09 PM

Post #6465242

Thanks for the information, Seedpicker!
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 26, 2009
3:32 PM

Post #6465351

you are welcome

here is a shot of some of our dichondra lawn as compared to the neighbor's winter rye...he had to seed it to get this color in winter,and had to mow every week, but the dichondra was nice and green, too, and now mowing.

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greyma
Mukwonago, WI

April 26, 2009
4:23 PM

Post #6465506

man, no mowing!! plenty of time for other things!!
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 27, 2009
12:36 AM

Post #6467628

you said it!

We have half an acre...it used to take us two hours every week, to edge and mow. That is 104 hours a year saved!
We think we may have added weeks, if not years to our life! :0)

...not to mention saved money on gasoline, lawnmower upkeep, and all those emitions and noise pollution
teko
Brillion, WI

April 28, 2009
5:12 PM

Post #6475255


I saw a picture in this thread that showed something similar to what I have.


Is this Kenilworth Ivy? I've been trying to get rid of it forever. It invades everywhere. It has little blue flowers and when you pick a leaf it has a spearmint smell. How do I get rid of it?


p.s. I'm new here and love this site. But, boy, the last thing I need is more ideas! Keep 'em coming!

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seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2009
5:18 PM

Post #6475279

nope. that is something else.

check and see if this doesn't match what you have(creeping charlie)
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/225654/

I've actually bought it before, lol...it looks great spilling over the edge of a tall container, or urn, or even hanging basket.

there is a variegated one, too:
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/31476/
teko
Brillion, WI

April 28, 2009
5:27 PM

Post #6475317

Thanks. You're right. I just checked and it looks like I'll have to just keep fighting it. There doesn't seem to be much I can do organically, and I try very hard not to use other means. I did find it hard to believe anyone could like this.
WUVIE
Hulbert, OK
(Zone 7a)

April 28, 2009
5:33 PM

Post #6475342

Love the candlesticks, indeed!

seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2009
6:14 PM

Post #6475516

thanks, wuvie!

found six more in the trash the other day, lol...but little different pattern that I don't like quite as well...
staceysmom
(GayLynn) Appleton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 28, 2009
8:33 PM

Post #6476188

You found more!!! Are you going to make candlesticks out of them too? Would love to see pictures when you are done.
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 28, 2009
10:12 PM

Post #6476639

yes, there are more of them(six) but they aren't as pretty...kinda ugly actually, lol...

I don't really know what to do with them...
-T

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dahtzu
Henderson, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 29, 2009
12:24 AM

Post #6477160

Not ugly to me, I like them.
Love those you made.
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2009
12:29 AM

Post #6477196

dahtzu-ok maybe for once in my life I'm seeing these as trash, and don't have the future vision of treasure in mind, or I just have creators block, lol... :0)

What would you do with them?

I guess if I made them into candle holders, I'd keep the square base, but use a saw to cut the top ones off...too bulky on top, maybe...

Maybe cut between the square top and first rung?
Lenjo
Mount Angel, OR
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2009
12:39 AM

Post #6477244

They are not junk, Taylor, I am sure you will think of something as you are so creative.I will be waiting to hear.
staceysmom
(GayLynn) Appleton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 29, 2009
1:04 AM

Post #6477404

I would cut the tops off too. Maybe you could cut them to all different heights. Cutting another section off of each one making them shorter and shorter. Would make a cool set. It would actually give you more that way. Paint 'em up and maybe even distress them. I don't see them as trash at all.
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

April 29, 2009
2:40 AM

Post #6477885

Oh Yeah! What Staceysmom said! A dozen of them at different heights...
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 29, 2009
12:20 PM

Post #6478791

well, I can't do a dozen, because I only have six, lol...

But, I do like the idea of varying heights, and it would be easy, considering the design

Thanks for the suggestions!
staceysmom
(GayLynn) Appleton, WI
(Zone 5a)

April 29, 2009
4:48 PM

Post #6479883

Actually you can do a dozen. Don't cut off the tops, just cut them at different sections and the tops then become the bottoms.
dillansnana
Hemet, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 10, 2009
7:39 AM

Post #6800780

Dear seedpicker_TX...I wish I had those spindles. I saw on DG a while back where they were used for garden art. They were stuck in the ground and topped with old telephone pole glass insulaters or leftover odd drinking glasses. Still looking for my "free garden spindles."
Be creative girl,...Best wishes,
Sylvia Kinnee
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 10, 2009
1:34 PM

Post #6801402

Sylvia-
I'd sure give them to you, but they'd cost a lot to ship, so there goes the free part, lol...
they are still in the garage collecting dust and waiting for inspiration :0)
hillabeans
Chaska, MN
(Zone 4a)

July 11, 2009
1:12 PM

Post #6805780

Oh- I think garden art is the way to go! Pick some super bright colors to go with your garden and paint em up. then put something on top? Like bowls with polka dots (coordinating colors of course) for mushrooms, or shiny globes... What about a plaque with house numbers, or garden sayings. I love that they are all diff legths.
Good luck!
staceysmom
(GayLynn) Appleton, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2009
2:45 PM

Post #6806147

dillansnana and hillabeans I love those ideas! I'm on the lookout now for some of those spindles now!
plantladylin
South Daytona, FL
(Zone 9b)

July 11, 2009
2:56 PM

Post #6806189

Oooh, if they are different lengths, I can envision them painted bright colors with a different size/shape birdhouse screwed or nailed to the top of each one and "planted" around the garden!
staceysmom
(GayLynn) Appleton, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2009
3:12 PM

Post #6806255

Oooooo I really like that idea!
AuntBusy
Stuart, FL

July 11, 2009
4:54 PM

Post #6806640

Hi there Seedpicker,

I love your idea regarding replacing the lawn with dichondra. Here in Florida, we are getting dryer and dryer weather conditions, with water restrictions, making it very hard to keep a nice lawn. The Dichondra looks like a wonderful alternative. How does one go about replacing the lawn with it? Do I buy seeds? Do I buy plants and dig up the grass? How did you manage to cover a whole half an acre with it? Would love some tips. Thank you Seedpicker :-)


hillabeans
Chaska, MN
(Zone 4a)

July 13, 2009
1:34 PM

Post #6813546

Oh yes, Little bird houses!! that is a GREAT idea!
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 13, 2009
2:06 PM

Post #6813658

AuntBusy-
You would have a hard time finding dichondra sod anywhere but California, but for the rest of us, there is a great site online that sells seeds :0)

On the patch that I showed in that photo of my strip of yard compared to the neighbors, I used a sod cutter to remove the grass. Other smaller sections were just over seeded after I killed the grass by withholding all water in summer.(yes it looked bad while letting the grass die, but it was the back, so no one saw it, but us)

I probably never would have considered going to the trouble of replacing my grass with anything other than more grass, lol...were it not for the three year drought we had. After three years of drought and restrictions that got as severe as only being allowed to water once a week in a very narrow window of between 7-9am on that one day, it got to be time to make new considerations!

Dichondra has made me very happy!! And, I love that it will grow in sun, or shade. The more sun it gets, the more water it will need, but it still doesn't require anywhere near as much as grass. It is actually a native here, so does very well.

Most people that see it, recognize it as "dollarweed",and to them it is a weed. But, I always love pointing out that in mass, it is a gorgoeus "weed". And what better survivor than to plant "weeds"???, lol...

Once it is established, dichondra in part sun will grow happily with little to no supplemental watering. We do not have a sprinkler system, and it does fine on just natural rainwater.

The only dichodra that I really have to drag the hose out for, are some of the sections in full blazing Texas sun, or the sections of newly seeded, or newly transplanted sections.

I'd recommend it in a heartbeat. We first tried it between pavers, to see how well it did, and see if we liked it. We loved it!

After observing it for a year, and seeing that it was evergreen and no maintenance, we jumped in with both feet, and that is when the sod cutter got to chugging on my grass, lol...

Be careful to watch the forecast, though!! We had a number of times that we spend a bundle on seed that all got washed away from a strong thunderstorm...plant seeds in dry, mild weather :0)

here is the site:
http://www.outsidepride.com/catalog/Dichondra-Groundcover-Seed-p-17000.html

...and here is the very first section that we ever tried between pavers

Thumbnail by seedpicker_TX
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seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 14, 2009
2:03 PM

Post #6817887

Just thought if any of you were interested...

Here is the original thread that made ME want dichondra years ago:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/466119/
AuntBusy
Stuart, FL

July 15, 2009
12:28 PM

Post #6821756

Thank you so much Seedpicker, for all the links and great information.

Right now we are exploring different options for our lawn, besides lack of rain and water restrictions, hubby is also sick and tired of mowing :-). So far, we are in the process of paving three fourths of the backyard, installing raised beds for veggies, and same level beds for some fruit trees. Next, we will be doing something with the front, and side lawn, possibly a series of native plants or and groundcovers :-).

Again, a big thank you, for taking the time and giving me all this great information.


seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2009
12:57 PM

Post #6821817

you are very welcome. I didn't mention before, but my husband had to have knee surgery, and that played a big part in the decision, too.

We LOVE not having to mow in this heat!!

Sounds like you will only have small patches left, when you are done with all your landscaping, so it won't require much seed. That site has other ground cover recommendations, if you decide you want something different.

I think white clover is one, but you might even look into blue star creeper. It is a nice little ground cover that stays very short, and blooms beautiful tiny pale blue flowers. If you go to stepables.com they list it as their number one seller.

In the process of going xeriscape, without trying to look like a cactus garden, I also removed all the grass in my curbside spot(the area between the sidewalk and curb/street). It was just too much work to keep it watered.

I planted it with tough perennials, like roses and daylilies, and it has done very well! People told me I was nuts, but I argued that plants with 12 inch roots had a much better chance of living than grass with roots that only reach one inch!! One inch of soil in 100+ degree weather will dry out in a matter of hours. And when you only got to water once a week, there was no way to keep grass alive, anyway.

All this to say that I planted blue star creeper in that area, and it did take some water to get going, but once established, I've been quite pleased at how drought resistant it has been.

Here is an older pic of the curbside garden

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seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 15, 2009
1:02 PM

Post #6821831

In that curbside shot, the foliage and boulders hide the star creeper, so here is a shot from the other side.

This was taken when it was still mazus reptans(couldn't locate my blue star creeper photo), but it has since been replaced with blue star creeper.

I'll post the blue star pic, if I can locate it...I have four years of photos stored on my pc, so it is a lot to sort through, lol...

I loved the mazus, but it just took too much water. I now still have some in the back garden, but it is near the birdbath, so less trouble to keep it watered there.
-T

Thumbnail by seedpicker_TX
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AuntBusy
Stuart, FL

July 15, 2009
9:30 PM

Post #6823842

Seedpicker, you really do have a green thumb! Your curbside looks beauuuuuuutiful!!!! If my yard ends up half way as nice as yours, I would be totally happy! What kind roses are those? Everything looks very low growing and lush! Beautiful, beautiful job!!! I am a beginner gardener, and don't know very much, but learning a little more each day :-)
Dirt_Road
Janice~ Gulf Coast, MS
(Zone 9a)

July 15, 2009
9:54 PM

Post #6823946

Awww Seed very nice job.. and thanks for the link.. Does the dichondra ever grow tall enough that you have to mow or trim it?
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 16, 2009
1:34 AM

Post #6824728

AuntB-
thanks! Those roses are coral carpet. But, I tried a rose this year, that I love even more. It is Peach Drift. Similar colors, but it has both pink and peach, and it blooms NON-stop. The coral carpet is supposed to be non-stop, also, but I am just so completely impressed with the Peach Drift.

We've been counting, and it has only been without a bloom two days since I bought it in May.

Those two days were July 9, & 10, and then it was back in bloom! And, it is currently in bloom. What a rose!

It only gets 2 ft, also, so I'd definitely recommend it over the coral carpet, or the oso easy roses.

Also, the pink buttercups really made that area fill in, and they are responsible for a lot of the blooms :0)

Dirt road-
Nope. I've never had to mow it, or trim it. We've had it for four years, now. In fact, if you mow it, you can stress it by cutting all the leaves off.

In fall when all the leaves fall, you cannot rake the dichondra, or it will snag and rip it. That is the only time we use a mower, but we set it up higher than the foliage, and only run it over the dichondra to suck up and mulch the leaves...
-T

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Dirt_Road
Janice~ Gulf Coast, MS
(Zone 9a)

July 16, 2009
3:45 AM

Post #6825262

Oh dichondra sounds wonderful then.. and in the fall maybe a leaf blower would help?
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 16, 2009
12:23 PM

Post #6825866

We have a blower, and that will definitely be better than a rake, but the mower is still best. It is faster, and plus with the bag on, it both picks up the leaves and mulches them at the same time, while also bagging it for you :0)

I don't know of a simpler, faster way than that :0)
AuntBusy
Stuart, FL

July 16, 2009
2:42 PM

Post #6826304

Seedpicker, thanks again for taking all this time and giving me all these great suggestions. Do you have an online source for these plants or do you just buy them locally? The roses sound great, and so do the buttercups, will have to see if I can find a retailer for them, here if Florida.
Dirt_Road
Janice~ Gulf Coast, MS
(Zone 9a)

July 16, 2009
3:00 PM

Post #6826357

lol.. can do.. mow and bag it.. :-) So as Aunt Busy asked, where do you purchase them? What about sandy soil? sorry didnt mean to Hijack your table leg thread.. ..
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 16, 2009
3:38 PM

Post #6826491

The Peach Drift roses were sold here locally in late Spring at Home Depot, and also at Calloways nursery.

I'm pretty sure the coral carpet roses were both at Home Depot and at Lowes last year.

The buttercups were seeds that I scattered. I bought a large packet from Plants for the Southwest:
http://www.plantsofthesouthwest.com/cgi-bin/plantview.cgi?_recordnum=1156

It is roughly about a teaspoon, or two, of teensy-tiny seeds. I scattered them by adding them to a little fine sand and then used a salt shaker to scatter them evenly, lol

As for the soil, ours is clay-based, but that bed was amended with sandy loam, to improve drainage. It is probably more sandy loam than the original soil.

Just one word of caution on the buttercups(aka evening primrose)...it can spread and some call it downright invasive. I took that into consideration, and felt that surrounded by four sides of concrete, where could it really go?, lol...

But, I would not suggest it in a more formal bed, although the unwanted seedlings can be really easy to prick out in Spring. But, if you wait until summer to pull them, they'll break off and will actually have to be dug out. And, they do reseed like mad, if you don't deadhead after blooming.

This is a plus for me in that bed, because I know I'll always have one of my favorite wildflowers, but not a plus, for someone that changes their mind about having them, lol...
AuntBusy
Stuart, FL

July 17, 2009
6:59 PM

Post #6831456

Seedpicker,
just wanted to say thank you again for all the great information you posted. Your nickname fits you perfectly, you have chosen some great seeds :-).
Happy gardening :-) and take care.
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 17, 2009
7:45 PM

Post #6831629

Thanks for the nice comments.
You are welcome.
:0)
GrandmaThyme
Lacey, WA

July 20, 2009
6:55 AM

Post #6840461

Hi! Newbie here. I was thrilled to read this thread! Hubby and I just landscaped the larger half of our front yard about a month ago. We planted dichondra in the "grass" area. If we like it, we're doing the other half of the yard the same way. We're getting a nice green haze of plants coming up now...I can hardly wait for it to fill in! I live in Washington state, and I've never seen a Dichondra lawn...but I did a lot of research before making my decision. I'm happy to hear so many people have been happy with their Dichondra!

Hubby and I are thrilled at the idea of NO MOWING and the fact that once it's established, we won't have to water all the time to keep it green! It makes me feel good hearing of the success others have had with Dichondra.

As for the spindles. How about drilling a hole in the bottom, gluing a dowel into the bottom and then poke the dowel into the ground. The dowel would allow you to stick it deep enough in the ground so it won't fall over, and it could be used to keep your hose out of your flowers. You could paint them and could add a wood ball or a mini bird house or some sort of decorative item to the top of them.
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 20, 2009
12:29 PM

Post #6840975

Grmathyme-
You will be SO happy you did that!!

If you live in Washington, you'll probably never have to water it, either.

Post pics when you can. I'd love to see :0)

Where did you buy your dichondra? Did you buy from outsidepride?

I just found a link for LOWEs that has it!! I think it is even cheaper than outsidepride, except it only comes in one size, but if you only want a few pounds, what a deal
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=136048-303-40021496006244&lpage=none


GrandmaThyme
Lacey, WA

July 21, 2009
5:23 AM

Post #6845004

seedpicker...I bought my dichondra seed from Park Seed online. They even transferred my call to one of their Horticulturists who was very willing to answer all my questions. I was going back and forth between a thyme and dichondra, and it was the Park Seed Horticulturist who convinced me to go with the dichondra.

It's just coming up now...green little sprouts spread pretty evenly across the whole area. Give me a few weeks and I'll post before and after pics!
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2009
10:29 AM

Post #6845384

Gthyme-
I had seen it listed in their catalog, but didn't realize it came in large quantities.

I look forward to seeing your pictures! :0)
BonnieGardens
Clermont, FL
(Zone 9a)

September 6, 2010
5:34 PM

Post #8084205

Seedpicker,
You have convinced me to give dichondra a try. I have an area under my favorite oak tree that simply will not grow grass and this might be a solution. I will first try it around my pond which has rocks I cemented tog. for its border. Thanks much for all the helpful info. Bonnie
J2222
Southern California, CA

September 7, 2010
5:57 PM

Post #8086156

This is a great thread. Many topics, I've enjoyed them all. The candlesticks are lovely. The other candlesticks could be glued together so you have a total of 3. Then, I'm not sure what I'd do with them, but most areas need something with a bit of height. LOL.
silverlinings
Richardson, TX

September 19, 2010
8:44 AM

Post #8107337

I also found some table legs, and made candle holders: these are the before,

Thumbnail by silverlinings
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silverlinings
Richardson, TX

September 19, 2010
8:46 AM

Post #8107341

Here are the finished holders...unless I play with them some more (no project is ever really finished!!).

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silverlinings
Richardson, TX

September 19, 2010
8:58 AM

Post #8107367

I'm also working on these legs, just primed them and plan to mosaic the top of the little plant stand. Also a bit of leftover leg from previous project: working on it , too.

Thumbnail by silverlinings
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silverlinings
Richardson, TX

September 19, 2010
9:00 AM

Post #8107369

and the last bits of the legs made into chunky holders...

Thumbnail by silverlinings
Click the image for an enlarged view.

JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

September 19, 2010
3:22 PM

Post #8108120

Beautiful!
curvesarein
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7b)

March 8, 2011
11:04 PM

Post #8415806

I have stamped concrete with cracks, I would love to know how to get it started in the cracks. Would the heat from the concrete keep it green in winter?
curvesarein
Kingman, AZ
(Zone 7b)

April 23, 2011
11:20 AM

Post #8515519

I got some then gave them away. ( the spindles) Put a base on them and mount a birdhouse. At different levels with several. Now how can I get Dicondra to grow in the cracks on my stamped concrete patio? Just seed it?
redviolet_0
Texarkana, TX

May 25, 2011
8:45 PM

Post #8587654

Silverlinings, I looove your candle holders!!! They look like something very expensive out of a decorators showroom!!!! Standing ovation coming from East Texas!!!!
Linny1
(Linny) Salem, SC
(Zone 7b)

May 26, 2011
6:17 AM

Post #8588053

On those 6 spindles, I'd glue them together into a block and use them as a plant stand. Maybe even a piece of glass on top, like a table.

I'd paint them first, then glue, so what you see through the holes would look good.

Love everybody's ideas.

Just a thought,

Linny
seedpicker_TX
(Taylor) Plano, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2013
6:47 AM

Post #9385682

hi everyone!
I've been away for a while, but just resubscribed and enjoyed looking at all these older posts.

Silver-your candle spindles are awesome!...way better than mine, lol...love the color. Is it Jacobean brown? Also, what did you put on them? is that a small black flat candle holder that you added to the tops?

Curves-yes, the heat from the rocks, (concrete, stones, etc.) will help in winter. I am in zone 8a and they never skip a beat in winter. We can get as low as 20F for several days in a row here.

psychw2

psychw2
(Pat) Kennewick, WA
(Zone 5b)

January 15, 2013
7:43 PM

Post #9386643

I had Praire primrose in my former home flowerbeds and LOVED it!! I'd gladly import some here!

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