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Beginner Gardening Questions: Growing Tomatoes in Nevada

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Forum: Beginner Gardening QuestionsReplies: 19, Views: 150
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Cherylo210
Jacksonville, OR

April 27, 2009
7:51 PM

Post #6471219

Does anyone know if a person can grow tomatoes in the Las Vegas Nevada area? Someone told me that tomatoes do not grow there and I wondered why?
Wulfsden
Riverdale, NJ
(Zone 6a)

April 27, 2009
9:06 PM

Post #6471478

Apparently, you can. A master gardener called Leslie Doyle has not only figured out how to do it, but she wrote a book about it too. She is also pretty active on the web. Here are a couple of links that should get you started... Ed


http://www.reviewjournal.com/lvrj_home/2000/Oct-04-Wed-2000/living/14481908.html

http://rodale.typepad.com/testgardener/2007/08/august-3rd.html
Cherylo210
Jacksonville, OR

April 27, 2009
9:08 PM

Post #6471481

Thank you so much!
myezek
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6a)

April 28, 2009
2:15 AM

Post #6472904

Not to be regional at all, we grow good tomatoes in the northern part of the state! Actually I'd think if you can grow tomatoes in Phoenix you should be able to grow them in LV. I think someone in the Self Contained Box Garden forum is growing them in Glendale AZ

locakelly

locakelly
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9a)

April 28, 2009
9:41 PM

Post #6476489

I live in Phoenix and grow tomatoes in containers as well as raised beds and they do just fine. Here we can direct sow seeds in January or set out transplants in Feb or early March - depends on how brave you are - lol. I set mine out early and can cover them if the temps turn cool. My best advice if your climate is anything like Phoenix is to choose varieties with shorter days to maturity. That way you will give the plants time to set fruit before the temps get too hot. We also plant late summer for a fall crop here. Kelly
Cherylo210
Jacksonville, OR

May 7, 2009
2:08 AM

Post #6515069

Thank you so much for all of this info. We currently live in Southern Oregon and I have a wonderful garden, flowerbeds and things i have started from babies. :) We are looking at moving to Pahrump NV. for my husbands work and I want to know that i can garden there like i do here with annuals and perinnials. Does anyone know how well things grow in the heat and such?
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

May 7, 2009
2:19 AM

Post #6515120

I think you're going to find a huge difference in climate--Pahrump is desert, hot and not much rainfall (to give you some perspective, it's one of the closest cities to Death Valley although it's higher elevation so it doesn't get quite as hot as Death Valley does). I don't know what you're growing now, but I expect you're going to have to discover some new types of plants. You can definitely have a pretty garden, but many of the things you're growing now in your nice cool wet Pacific Northwest climate will fry in the desert. To get an idea of things that you should be able to grow, http://www.highcountrygardens.com is a nice website specializing in drought tolerant plants for dry western climates.
duchessdreams
Reno, NV

May 7, 2009
9:29 PM

Post #6518643

Cherylo210. I lived in Vegas for several years and you can grow some killer plants (didn't get to grow too much as was there for school). But Ecrane is also right. It's going to be a bit of an adjustment about what kind of plants you can use.. If it needs lots of water, cool weather, chill periods, it may not work at all. On the other hand I had the most increadably beutiful Pepper tree in my front yard that needed practicaly no attention. Several of the folks I know down there had unbeliveably beutiful tropical style gardens. And a couple of them housed desert tortises in their gardens. My sugestion would be to drive around when you get there and see what you like. Also check out the master gardeners courses, the UNLV gardens, all that. And if you want any restrant recomendation shoot me a Dmail ;)

Good luck.
Cherylo210
Jacksonville, OR

May 12, 2009
1:54 AM

Post #6536720

Ecrane3 & Duchessdreams thank you so much. I love to have my hands in the dirt! Moving to the desert from the pacific NW scares me a bit. My veggie garden and my flower beds are so beautiful here and I worry about not being able to garden in the Las Vegas area. I will read more on this website and see what i can learn.
ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

May 12, 2009
2:14 AM

Post #6536847

Don't worry--you can absolutely have a beautiful garden there too, you will just need to learn to garden with some different types of plants than what you're used to. If you don't already have a copy of the Sunset Western Garden book, I'd definitely pick one up--that way you can figure out what your new Sunset zone is and have a better chance of finding plants that will work since just trusting the USDA zones for a climate like that will not necessarily be helpful.
myezek
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6a)

May 12, 2009
1:37 PM

Post #6538254

You might also want to pick up Nevada Gardener's Guide by Linn Mills and Dick Post. It covers both northern and southern Nevada and is quite good. BTW there is a botanical garden in Henderson at the Ethel M chocolate factory. I've never had a chance to go, it's supposed to be pretty special. Plus there's chocolate nearby.
duchessdreams
Reno, NV

May 12, 2009
11:12 PM

Post #6540714

Both are very nice =) Mmm. Chocolate.

You'll be fine down there and there are definately some plants that will work for you in Vegas that you'll love. I seriously miss my hedge of rosemary. It was about four feet of rosemary draping over and stone wall. Beutiful.
Cherylo210
Jacksonville, OR

May 13, 2009
3:02 PM

Post #6543070

Yum, chocolate and flowers! My two favorite things. :) You all have raised my spirits about this, so thank you from the bottom of my heart! I cannot imagine a world without my flowers, trees and veggies.
duchessdreams
Reno, NV

May 13, 2009
8:56 PM

Post #6544499

=) You just made my day.
myezek
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6a)

May 13, 2009
11:14 PM

Post #6545005

Oh, to have a rosemary hedge!! After 22 winters in this house, I finally got rosemary to winter over. I still can't figure it out, it was planted in a barrel that was out in the open and it survived. Probably just a fluke and it won't make it next year.
duchessdreams
Reno, NV

May 14, 2009
9:13 PM

Post #6548919

I hear you. Moved a while back and the rosemary I brought in for the winter didn't make it. I cryed it had gotten pretty decent size too. If you do figure out what magic kept yours going you have to share =)
melsalz
Mooresville, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 15, 2009
12:49 PM

Post #6551462

I used to live in Vegas and always had wonderful tomatoes. In fact they would always self seed and I would get tons of volunteers every year. You just have to make sure they get watered, alot, I had a sprinkler system set up for watering every day. The only place I've every lived that needed that much water. But the heat and arid conditions required it. Good luck!
Cherylo210
Jacksonville, OR

May 15, 2009
9:00 PM

Post #6553377

My husband does a very cool thing to keep things alive during the winter if they are outside. He uses christmas lights and wraps them around the base of the plant and then uses a blanket or something to cover those. We use an old moving blanket. When it gets super cold, he just strings the lights in the branches and it seems to work miracles. :) I have not idea if there is any science behind this, but it works well for him.
Nanabird
Las Vegas, NV

May 16, 2009
3:53 PM

Post #6556202

Its great reading everyone's comments on how to grow tomatoes. Have any of you ever used a Topsy Turvy??
My one planter is doing great as I have 5 tomatoes on it now. The other one I planted in the Topsy Turvy has no blossoms at all, even though I fertilized with vegetable fertilizer.
gcorrier
Lenoir City, TN

May 17, 2009
1:46 PM

Post #6559564

Nanabird: Are the tomatos the same type and planted same time? Some do bloom later than others. I'm sure you know this as it sounds like this is not your first rodeo, so to speak. Also keep in mind I believe plants are like people we all react a little differently to system shocks. Some of us take a little more time than others to blossom. Take any 2 seeds/kids and expose to exactly the same circumstance and you will get different reactions and timing of the reactions. Just something I think we all need to keep in mind dealing with plants and people.

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