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Garden Talk: Name 3 plants you don't like and why...

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SusanLouise
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2009
7:27 AM

Post #6537569

I thought this would make for an interesting thread...
As for myself, they are Geraniums, Marigolds and Mums...
Why?
Boring...same ole', same ole'...
I know most of the gardeners that I know that get them and fill their pots and gardens with them want to be able to plant and forget about them...so to speak...they are easy and very hardy. Well, yes they are. When I see them myself I can't pass by them quick enough. I choose my plants according to them being benificial for more than one thing besides their beauty...either being a host or nectar plant for a butterfly, provide nourishment for birds...such as seeds and/or nectar for hummingbirds (like Salvias)...or bring benifical insects such as ladybugs (like Yarrow), and higher pollen content for the bees.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 12, 2009
12:48 PM

Post #6538036

Three I don't like, due to their invasive qualities, are:

Celandine
Aegopodium
Houttuynia (but at least it is beautiful)

June_Ontario
Rosemont, ON
(Zone 4a)

May 12, 2009
11:26 PM

Post #6540801

1. A rose that doesn't have a scent. Seems pointless.
2. Big, fat, frilly Bearded Irises. Old varieties with slender, clean, natural shapes look better to me.
3. Split-trumpet daffodils. They look like someone punched them on the nose.

This message was edited May 13, 2009 7:39 AM
JasperDale
Long Beach, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 13, 2009
2:15 AM

Post #6541456

Only because they're so overused and everyone here seems to have them:
Agapanthus
Wheelers Dwarf Pittosporum
Tam Junipers

same old same old everywhere.
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

May 13, 2009
6:01 PM

Post #6543800

I'll go along with you, JD, and add:

alyssum - way overused, it makes me sneeze, and it's just kinda ugly IMO
Bird of Paradise, unless it's used in a tropical setting - also overused here
large white calla lily - screams 'funeral' - when I worked in a hospital we used to groan when they were delivered to our patients. For some reason, the smaller colored varieties don't have that effect on me.
cedar18
Lula, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2009
6:06 PM

Post #6543825

My votes:
Leyland cypress - used way too much; there are better screening options than a towering wall of green.
Trumpet trees - Brugmansia - too tropical for "regular" gardens; also overused here
Wax leaf begonias - look fake
venu209
Jersey Shore, NJ
(Zone 7a)

May 16, 2009
11:09 PM

Post #6557431

crabgrass
crabgrass
crabgrass
steph_gem
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 16, 2009
11:29 PM

Post #6557480

all weeds especially clover. Its my nemisis. Its every where. Its taking over my thyme, and its just everywhere.
aspargus ferns. same thing.
and my stupid morning glory that actually planted
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 17, 2009
12:39 AM

Post #6557751

There are many plants I find easy to admire on someone else's property and morning glory is one of them. I did plant it in pots to climb along with the Mandevilla vines in this container and just hope the birds don't spread the seeds.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

NatureLover1950
Vicksburg, MS
(Zone 8a)

May 17, 2009
12:06 PM

Post #6559227

Bradford flowering pear trees--waaaay overused
Petunias--local businesses need to come up with something different
Indian hawthorn--local businesses are the guilty culprits again
Pyrola5
Bradford, PA
(Zone 5a)

May 17, 2009
1:10 PM

Post #6559445

Hi, new here.

Hibiscus - because they are so huge and, in my area, barely bloom before frost arrives.
The ground cover someone planted 20some years ago along my garage where I have my main flowerbed. Been fighting that stuff for years without hope.
Daffodils after they bloom. Previous owners also planted lots of them along the garage. I have been moving them to other areas but still have a lot.
Well, have to go to work. You all have a great day. Lyn
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

May 17, 2009
5:30 PM

Post #6560447

Welcome, Lyn!

Ice plant ground cover is used around here a lot. People planted it thinking it would help with erosion and be fire safe. Trouble is, it takes tons of water and fertilizer to look good and the roots are not deep enough to anchor the soil. Looks pretty in the spring when the hills are all magenta, that's about it.
shadowgarden
Philo, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 18, 2009
3:06 AM

Post #6563014

Red geraniums, I hate the way they smell.

Yellow forsythia, I don't like their color.

Yellow daffodils, guess why.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 18, 2009
10:43 AM

Post #6563793

shadowgarden - I used to feel that way about the color orange. Now I've reformed and I enjoy it. One of the many nice things about specific colors in the garden is that if we don't like them we don't have to have them.
cedar18
Lula, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 18, 2009
11:00 AM

Post #6563822

pirl, I also didn't care for orange. Then 2 yrs ago I saw a couple of orangey plants I like. Now I have a "hot" border of orange and yellow plants! And I don't like magenta, but somehow I now have several plants in that color. Go figure...
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 18, 2009
11:11 AM

Post #6563841

One of my neighbors hates orange and visits every year when the orange Asiatic lilies are in bloom. She stands, arms crossed, stares at them and repeats her mantra of "I hate orange". She could look at the other 29 gardens but I guess she's just born to complain.

On the other hand I don't like weeds or dead plants but I don't go over with arms crossed and visit each garden telling her what I don't like.

She won't like one of the new Asiatic lilies at all!

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

iris28
(dana)Owensboro, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 18, 2009
1:17 PM

Post #6564255

i dont like monkey grass , its in every yard . and berberry i dont know how you spell that . we had 3, 5 footers we pulled out . ferns are ok but im getting tired of everyone talking about them around here. i get it ,we are country and you need them hanging from your porch . try a pretty hanging basket for a change . sorry . lol
junipers , burning bushes are in every yard . theres also an azalea and a dogwood in every yard here but i like those . my neighbor has a mimosa tree and i love how it looks but for goodness sakes sweep the sidewalk . have you ever tried to push a stroller in that mess . weeds dont bother me that much i ignore them . and only pull them when they are tall enough to pull with out kneeling .lol
NatureLover1950
Vicksburg, MS
(Zone 8a)

May 18, 2009
9:22 PM

Post #6566475

I have some burnt orange day lilies I really like. Me and my Monarch butterflies can't live without our beautiful orange butterfly weed either.
artemiss
Toledo, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2009
1:56 PM

Post #6569610

Only three?

Ok, I'll bite-

1) Forsythia-we just yanked out out of the back that we had been cutting back to almost nothing every year, only to have it get 7' tall again. Oh..and every single little green twig that fell on the ground is now a rooted plant..arghh!!! Pretty, but just too overwhelming. It is being replaced with a Buffalo currant..still gets pretty yellow spring flowers, but they smell nice AND make edible fruit.


2) Creeping charlie..is this stuff immortal? It's like the mythical hydra..I cut off one strand, and it seems like seven more replace it.

3) The annual salvia sold at garden centers in purple and red. I just plain don't get it's appeal..and it's also WAY overused.

I could add to this list: anything with thorns that doesn't give me berries/fruit in return for my pain and suffering incurred while tending to it (this means you, barberry bushes that are only still living 'cause my fiance likes you for some strange reason..)
The ajuga someone planted in the front beds years ago that is now all over in the lawn
Datura-for being so easy for everyone else to grow, yet impossible for me to even germinate






JasperDale
Long Beach, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 19, 2009
2:59 PM

Post #6569850

I should have added this at the beginning: Palm Trees
They're everywhere here. Everywhere.
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

May 19, 2009
3:04 PM

Post #6569872

Oh, yes. And what we hate to see is when the cities pull out shade trees and replace them with 30 foot palms! How about choosing the right trees in the first place?
artemiss
Toledo, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2009
3:07 PM

Post #6569889

"I should have added this at the beginning: Palm Trees
They're everywhere here. Everywhere."


Now them's fightin' words to someone who lives in zone 5 and spends half of her vacation drooling over that which she cannot have at least not in the yard, anyway! ;-)
Just kidding..I feel the same way about maple trees and their little "helicopter" seeds.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 19, 2009
3:25 PM

Post #6569965

Oh those maple seedlings! They are truly maddening.
JasperDale
Long Beach, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 19, 2009
3:45 PM

Post #6570035

I'd trade Maple seeds for flying 12 foot palm fronds in a split second.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 19, 2009
6:05 PM

Post #6570517

Okay, okay - you win!
SusanLouise
Lincoln, NE
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2009
8:32 PM

Post #6571050

Hmmmm...speaking of trees...
Here in the mid west, from the time just before the cottonwood fuzz is flying, there is a thick heavy sap that falls from the trees and with it the seeds. WARNING! don't park your car anywhere near one of these trees then...the sap is like cement and it takes a zillion car washes for the stuff to come off...and then if you leave your car too long, the sap will be gooy enough to allow the cottonwood fuzz to adhere to the car then you'll be driving away in a powder puff...ROFL!
No Joke...learned my lesson the hard way!
iris28
(dana)Owensboro, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 19, 2009
8:47 PM

Post #6571097

My pecan tree does that. i get in trouble every yr . i park under it because its close to the walk.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2009
3:41 AM

Post #6573012

Marigolds, I hate them, my husband loves them. He would plant them like little soldiers all in a row. I can't stand the smell.

Houttuynia and artemisia for it's invasiveness. I do like the looks of both, but they just take over.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2009
8:53 AM

Post #6573476

I vote no on artimesias ,Why dont the classify them as a weed. Its the deadheading to keep them under controle that drives me nuts.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 20, 2009
11:20 AM

Post #6573639

I'm anti Marigolds - WAY over used and they stink. I could say the same for Houttuynia but, thankfully, they're not over used but the stench reminds me of the bean dinner on "Blazing Saddles".

Silver Mound artemesia is fine and I have had Limelight in the past (ripped it out) and can't believe I bought it again but this time for a pot. It was supposed to be mixed with others but now I think I'll leave it in a pot all by itself. Is that the one that needs deadheading, Jo Ann?

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2009
11:32 AM

Post #6573675

I miss spoke. Its Anthemis the one with yellow flowers.
I cant believe I bouhght it twice in my lifetime.
Let me check to be sure I have the right plant this time.
I also have to move the hose.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2009
11:37 AM

Post #6573689

Yep its anthemis.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 20, 2009
12:39 PM

Post #6573908

It's well behaved here, most thankfully. It does require a ton of deadheading to keep it in bloom.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2009
12:43 PM

Post #6573918

My artemisia stands about 8 inches tall, and spreads by runners. No seeds. A friend gave it to me a few years ago, and she has heavier soil, and says it doesn't run for her. It's very pretty for bouquets. At least it smells nice when I'm pulling all those runners out. I know it's not Silver Mound. I had that one for a few years and loved it, but it's only marginally hardy here.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 20, 2009
12:55 PM

Post #6573951

Mine spreads by runners. If it spread via seed I'd have a million plants...would you believe a thousand?

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 20, 2009
1:07 PM

Post #6574001

Oh this is too funny, I thought I was the only with dislikes because everyone has that stinking plant/tree in their yard...rofl.

What a wonderful start to morning, knowing I'm not nuts...

thanks all

Janet
Bradford flowering pear trees are my strong dislikes...
artemiss
Toledo, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 20, 2009
1:29 PM

Post #6574075

Ohh...you mean the "catpee-trees"?

I forgot about those..I lived in an apt that had one of those in the yard..my ex and I spent a few days looking for the cat pee in the house the first spring I was there and had the windows open. We then realized it was the smell of the stupid, stinking flowering tree outside.. why ANYONE would deliberately plant something that has a faintly-cat-pee-esque scent is beyond me!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2009
1:30 PM

Post #6574080

Boxwood blooming sends me to change the litterbox daily until I figure out whats going on.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 20, 2009
1:41 PM

Post #6574119

My sense of smell was greatly diminished when I had an operation in 2001 so maybe I should be very grateful since we have boxwoods in the back, along with pines and I understand they give off an unpleasant odor at times, along with a Bradford Pear in the front.
Pyrola5
Bradford, PA
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2009
1:51 PM

Post #6574158

My husband is doing battle with a forsythia - I don't mind it because it is in back of the garage between us and the neighbors but they do grow like crazy. I agree about the maples, we got rid of 2 huge ones a few years ago - now we actually have grass and flowers in our front yard. lol I have some ajuga,too and a ground cover (ugly) that someone planted years ago. Was just outside trying to deal with all the daffodil plants now that they are not blooming. They were here when we moved in 20 some years ago and I am trying to move them to areas I don't want for other plants. (wherever that is!!) Got to go to work. You all have a great day. Lyn

Calif_Sue

Calif_Sue
Northern California
United States
(Zone 9a)


May 20, 2009
3:44 PM

Post #6574601

Junipers, just a nest for cobwebs
Marigolds, stink plus folks are guilty of doing the 'soldiers in a row' look with them, I actually cringe when I see people load up their carts with marigolds, ugh!
Wax leaf begonias, ugly!

Edited to fix spelling, sheesh.



This message was edited May 20, 2009 10:25 AM

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2009
4:05 PM

Post #6574690

Ahhh mEN
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

May 20, 2009
4:38 PM

Post #6574833

And to think I used to envy people with forsythia and maple trees! LOL
We have a lot of Artemisia native to California, aka sagebrush, mugwort, etc. Not only does it stink, it's very bad for people with allergies.
Oh, Sue, do I agree about Juniper! Hate those rocket plants!
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 23, 2009
2:05 PM

Post #6586718

OK..I'm going to jump in ...Shirley poppies - they look weedy, spindly and they have never ever bloomed for me, here on the prairie!! Sweet Autumn Clematis- I as a clematis newbie, planted them by seed and they grew so fast that one caught a girly pumpkin and threw her to the other side of the yard...then of course I had to read about their invasiveness... so they are no longer...but now I'm on the lookout for the seedlings. Eupatorium rugosum 'Chocolate'- I planted it 3 years ago and it is the worst raggedly thug gift giver ever! My 'Chocolate' disappeared after the first year, but its unsightly, rangly seedlings have been sprouting all over the yard ever since! The seedlings seem to shoot up overnight with large gangly weedy looking leaves...and I hate that I ever planted that 'Chocolate' all over again!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 23, 2009
2:09 PM

Post #6586737

Love your post!

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 23, 2009
2:20 PM

Post #6586783

LOL
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 23, 2009
8:00 PM

Post #6587937

;0)...and I'm still hating that 'Chocolate'!!!
steph_gem
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 25, 2009
11:18 PM

Post #6597070

artemiss
I have to agree with that ugly salvia. i hate that are that horrible orange red.
there are so many beautiful salvia , why do they even sell those ones.

Junipers were everywhere in new mexico. my brother and I called the spider bushes.

There are some artemisias that i really love. I have never had a spreading varity. i also have found that planting them around roses, keeps the aphids away from the roses, but they cover the artemisia. i love the lacy silver one and the varigated one.
chris_h
Waukegan, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 27, 2009
1:09 AM

Post #6602062

It's so interesting how plants can behave differently in different gardens. I have had the "Chocolate" eupatorium in my garden for several years and it has been a very attractive plant for me. I have moved it once because it got too big for the spot where I had it and I gave a division of it to my son. I don't think he's had any trouble with it. I have never had any seedlings show up. I had it in the sun where did very well and I now have it in medium shade where it's doing just fine although it doesn't bloom quite as heavily. The only drawback I have experienced is that when it was in the sun it attracted hordes of tiny little flies (at least they looked like flies) when in bloom. I haven't seen that since I moved it to the shadier site.

I don't like:

Ladybells - very, very invasive - spreads by runners and seed, impossible to eradicate and within a few years will be infesting every border in your yard and probably your neighbors' too.

Houttuynia - it spread in a scattered way for me - not useful as a groundcover and the smell of it makes me feel sick.

Tall asters - although I still have them I have relegated them to obscure areas where I can neglect them because 1- they require so much staking, 2- the lower stems get all brown and ratty looking so you have to carefully plant something else to hide those stems if you want to keep your garden looking healthy, 3-The branches are so woody and tough that cutting them down in the fall or spring is quite arduous and 4 - in my opinion they don't bloom long enough to justify all that work. But I guess I must disagree with myself because I still haven't completely gotten rid of them.

garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 27, 2009
2:34 AM

Post #6602581

Chris~ agree 'Chocolate' is an attractive plant...it is the gift of it's thug offsprings that causes the trouble as 'Chocolate' does not come true from seed. Glad it's behaving itself in your gardens and hope it continues to so...

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 27, 2009
9:37 AM

Post #6603364

Another plant I dont like is Ajuga,talk about running - a -amuck!!!
Zuzu
Sebastopol, CA
(Zone 9a)

May 27, 2009
11:53 AM

Post #6603580

The plants I don't like are the ones my neighbors allow to go wild: St. John's Wort, blackberry vines, and ivy. They keep creeping over and under my fences and I sometimes feel that half of my gardening time is taken up by trying to keep those out of my garden.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 27, 2009
11:57 AM

Post #6603588

I have ajuga and it does need constant control. For a border it works fine but once it gets within a garden it's a pest. Burgundy Glow ajuga never has gone wild but Silver Brocade borders on invasive.
echoes
South of Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 3a)

May 27, 2009
12:08 PM

Post #6603608

Wave Petunias
Wax Begonias
those middle of the pot/planter things they call spikes.


pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 27, 2009
12:09 PM

Post #6603612

I'm not a fan of those spiky things either. I think they are dracena but they are not beautiful and have been so overused with zonal geraniums, for years, that it's boring - not "classic" to me.
echoes
South of Winnipeg, MB
(Zone 3a)

May 27, 2009
12:23 PM

Post #6603645

Yes, Dracena. That's the plant.
winterrobin
South Dennis, NJ
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2009
12:52 PM

Post #6603787

My turn.
1-Canna. I'm probably angering lots of people here. This plant has its own forum no less!
The foliage is interesting, but the flower heads are a muddled mess.
2-Those weak spindly looking dwarf iris.
3-Celosia. Any variety, any loud color, but especially the convoluted ones that look like brains. Yeesh.
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 27, 2009
2:05 PM

Post #6604098

Regarding dracena..my girly pumpkin calls them dracula...pointed like his cape or teeth, but more likely when she was younger dracula was easier to say than dracena.

Winterrobin~ I have to agree with the dwarf iris..detest them,,,but then again, I detest the standard iris that my friends try to unload on me every year... Perhaps you have tried celosia ' pink candles' ...Critter introduced them to me several swaps back...they are quite stunning in the gardens with their magenta to burgundy leaves and they'' call every flying pollinator in your neighborhood to your yard, if you're scarce of pollinators. There is one drawback..you have to deadhead regularly when the blooms decline or they'll eagerly reseed for you. Fortunately, the seedlings are very easy to pull up.
winterrobin
South Dennis, NJ
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2009
2:50 PM

Post #6604327

garden6 I actually planted Pink Flamingo celosia once. It sounds very similar to your Pink Candles. It's pretty in a way, and NOTHING like those revolting brains and other
too-bright celosias you see at garden centers all the time. But for more lasting results, I planted penisetum (sp?) "Moudry" for deep burgundy leaves. It's very graceful.
JasperDale
Long Beach, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 27, 2009
4:09 PM

Post #6604637

LOL at "Celosia's that look like brains". !!! They really do, don't they !
JasperDale
Long Beach, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 27, 2009
4:12 PM

Post #6604653

If I have to dig up another palm tree seedling I'm going to pull my hair out by the root.
winterrobin
South Dennis, NJ
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2009
4:24 PM

Post #6604731

Someone gave me six of these celosia one summer, that he had lovingly raised from seed. What a ghastly waste of time. They were bright red. I was horrified.
KaperC
No. San Diego Co., CA
(Zone 10b)

May 27, 2009
5:56 PM

Post #6605130

JD, you should see our slope! Those little palms are popping up all over. At least they are growing in the mulch and are easily pulled up.
GardenSox
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9a)

May 27, 2009
9:57 PM

Post #6606118

I hate palm seedlings too. Every month or so I have to spend an entire Saturday morning plucking the little buggers from my lawn, the walkways, cracks in the concrete slab around my house, the gutters . . . they're everywhere!!!!!
mamasita
Southern Dutchess Co, NY
(Zone 5b)

May 27, 2009
10:38 PM

Post #6606277

Sounds like the same problem we have, but with maple or elm seedlings. We just mow over them. If they are in the garden area, they are pulled. The absolute worst are the sumac seedlings. If you don't catch them early, they are a pain to eradicate. Plus, they stink.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 28, 2009
1:28 AM

Post #6607007

Oh my gosh, sumac seedlings. The bane of my husbands existance. Those things can travel for miles underground if not pulled right away.
mamasita
Southern Dutchess Co, NY
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2009
1:36 AM

Post #6607052

They are truly awful! I've had some right up next to the foundation that were nearly impossible to eliminate. I just hate them.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 28, 2009
1:57 AM

Post #6607138

Luckily we've never had them near the foundation.

I've had some in my flower bed in the wooded area, and took a strip out of the bed when they were pulled out. My hisband can spot them a mile away.

And I used to love the looks of the mature tree/ shrub, whatever it is, beatiful fall color. Not anymore.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 28, 2009
10:40 AM

Post #6608302

It's always nice to see a mistake I haven't made!

My friend planted one and within two years had to dig up a huge area, I'd guess it was about 20' x 20', just to get rid of the entire sumac and all the runners and seedlings.
Pyrola5
Bradford, PA
(Zone 5a)

May 28, 2009
12:14 PM

Post #6608490

Sumac! DS dug some up one year (it grows wild) and took it to her home in the suburbs. DB and I thought she should know better. Haven't heard her mention it but I would suspect she has regretted taking it. The maple seedlings are a pain too, altho we also mow over them. BTW, my BIL ask why maples only seed every 2 years. Anyone know if that is true? The two I had in my yard made a mess every year!!!
I have a hummingbird vine that puts up shoots all over but they are mowed off. In the flowerbeds I pull them out.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 28, 2009
12:22 PM

Post #6608516

I've dug very deep and still can't seem to ever get out all of the hummingbird vine roots - they're another wanderer.

Our maples throw off seedlings every year.
mamasita
Southern Dutchess Co, NY
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2009
1:41 PM

Post #6608794

I think maples seed every year. If they flower, then there is a good chance there will be seeds, unless maybe there was a late frost or some other event which affected the flowers.

I don't know anyone up here who would deliberately plant sumac. It grows wild here, and is a pain to eliminate. The seedlings appear just about everywhere - I suppose much like the palm seedlings.

Skunk cabbage is another plant I could really live without. It's fine growing back in the woods, but then it pops up in the yard, too. Even the deer won't touch it!
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

May 28, 2009
1:50 PM

Post #6608843

Sumac's fall colors are boasted about in several gardening magazines, but they neglect to tell you what an ugly, rangly shrub it is the other 11 months of the year.
steph_gem
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 30, 2009
3:09 AM

Post #6616352

another thing I hate. liqued amber trees. I have had five choped down already. there roots are horrible and those pokey balls. I also have thousands of seedlings to pull.
iris28
(dana)Owensboro, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 1, 2009
12:43 AM

Post #6623959

i now hate wild strawberries
JasperDale
Long Beach, CA
(Zone 10a)

June 1, 2009
5:37 AM

Post #6625051

You can't beat Liquidambers for their fall color in So. Calif., though...
You're right Steph...those seed pods are like midieval torture devices.
huckleberry6
Eagle Point, OR
(Zone 8a)

June 3, 2009
3:02 AM

Post #6634173

English Ivy when it goes female and blooms. It happens in Sept. here when the weather is hot and the scent is nauseating to me. The yellowjackets love it. I try to trim off the branches now before it blooms...nipping it in the bud.

Goathead puncture vine. A nice-looking little green mat with pretty yellow flowers. The seeds have horns that will punture bicycle tires, cripple dogs, and have to be removed from the soles of shoes with pliers. I ask permission to remove them from other's places too. No one realises the horrible stickers come from such a harmless- looking groundcover volunteer.

Stepford Wives color spot bloomin' bedding plants. I love surprise in a garden, not conformity. I feel sorry for the poor pansies, petunias, marigolds and their well-behaved siblings. When the Stepford Husbands "accidentally" spray them with Round-Up it is a mercy-killing.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 3, 2009
3:50 AM

Post #6634430

I've already listed my three, but this year we have tons and tons of oak tree babies popping up all over (where the squirrels buried the acorns, I guess). They still have the acorns attached when we pull them up. Kind of neat, but they seem to be in the nice soft dirt in the garden beds mainly.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 3, 2009
9:43 AM

Post #6634927

Hi Polly,squirrls are lazy,thay like nice soft beds and planters and newly planted anything where the soil is loose.
I detest sumak in the garden but in the fall , along the hiways ,its beautiful color.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2009
12:29 PM

Post #6635230

huckleberry6 - great posts. It's grand to start the day with a few laughs.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 3, 2009
1:12 PM

Post #6635385

Yes, I forgot to comment on that. It was quite the laugh to read.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2009
1:48 PM

Post #6635534

I enjoyed the Stepford Wives bedding plants and the mercy killing best of all.
garden6
Lansing, KS
(Zone 5b)

June 3, 2009
3:02 PM

Post #6635919

Third that on the "Stepford wives!"


huckleberry6
Eagle Point, OR
(Zone 8a)

June 4, 2009
3:55 AM

Post #6639505

Thanks for the compliments and the advisory on Sumac. Every autumn I tell myself I've got to pull over somewhere along the highway and dig a few small starts with good color to transplant to my very own driveway. Perhaps I should rethink that. I read somewhere the berries make a lemonade-like drink if you soak them in water(?).

I did not like Oregon Grape (Mahonia) when I moved here and tore alot of it out of the places I wanted to garden. I have come to appreciate it for its soft yellow spring blossoms, lovely dusty blue berries, startling orange-mahogony leaf color (which can occur anytime) in addition to the dark green leaves. It is unappealing to grazing animals. Now I encourage it and have appologised for my ignorant Mahonia massacre.

I would have listed poison oak as my #1 nemesis but it seemed so obvious. I was surprised once by a large display of honey gathered from the blossoms of poison oak. It was supposed to relieve arthritis pain(?), but I didn't try it. Anyway, that gave me a new respect for my old enemy.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

June 4, 2009
11:51 AM

Post #6640065

"Mahonia massacre" - just too funny!
kastrol
West Chester, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 6, 2009
1:30 PM

Post #6649505

1. Orange daylily. were in my yard when we bought the house...every where and spread everywhere...almost can't get rid of them...The leaves get brown and ugly at the bottom and you constantly have to tidy them up. Where they were in my yard was damp all the time and when you cleaned them up I was always getting bitten by nats or mosquito. Just hate, hate, hate orange daylily!

2. Obedient Plant. Spreads and fills an area in one season and takes over. Crowds out all the other flowers in the same flower bed. Not especially attractive foliage and when it finally blooms late in the season it really is not worth the wait.

3. Mulberry Trees. We had about 7 or 8 Mulberry Trees down one side of our yard when we first bought our house. The berries seem to fall all along the side walk way. (So many!!!! They would cover it) Constantly having to rake/sweep them up. Got the broom all stained. Everyone would walk on them and get them all over the soles of their shoes and then bring them in the house...Ruined many a Rug!
I know the birds love them, but...
chris_h
Waukegan, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 10, 2009
12:10 AM

Post #6665660

I'm curious about the comments about sumac. 2 gardens near my home have Staghorn Sumac growing in them. In one garden it is kept pruned with the trunks bare to about 4 feet up from the ground. It's shape is very picturesque like something you would see in a Japanese garden. I've never seen any sprouts around it so I don't know how the gardener deals with them. The other one I've seen is fuller in shape but still a nice size for a garden...again, I've seen no sign of spreading. Maybe they are just incredibly diligent gardeners but I hardly ever see them working in their gardens.

I did some volunteer gardening a few years ago at a local college and there was a sumac in one of the garden areas I worked on. There were a good number of 2 to 4 feet tall offspring around it (the garden had been untended for several years) when I began working there but they were relatively easy to remove and we left the main one as an anchor plant in the large garden. It didn't present a problem but I had only worked there for three years when the school moved to a Chicago campus so I don't know what's happening there now.

Sumac does grow wild around here so I am puzzled by the apparent good behavior I see in the gardens I've seen. Maybe the conditions in the gardens here are not ideal enough to for it to go crazy.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 10, 2009
12:48 AM

Post #6665871

Sumac is very invasive here. We've pulled up runners 20-30 feet away from the main sumac, and all along the runner baby sumacs were coming up. It's runners always head for the best dirt, the flower beds.

They are very pretty, and if all that's around it is lawn you could just keep mowing the shoots down, but it does spread to all the garden beds.
mamasita
Southern Dutchess Co, NY
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2009
1:38 AM

Post #6666145

Polly is right. Plus, when they drop their "leaves" it's more like branches. Messy, invasive plants that stink. I can't stand the way they smell. And they not only spread by runners, they also send out gazillions of seeds that invade every free piece of land they can find. When I do cut one down, I then paint the cut area with Brush Be Gone, and that seems to help control the suckers. Painting instead of spraying was a recommendation from a DEC friend.
chris_h
Waukegan, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 10, 2009
5:30 AM

Post #6667209

Some of your descriptions sound exactly like Ailanthus altissima otherwise known as Stinkweed. It looks very much like sumac but grows to be a large tree. The clues I see mentioned that say Ailanthus to me are: 20 foot runners with babies sprouting all along the way...the smell, when it blooms, is an unpleasant musky smell but the smell when you crush a twig or leaf is nauseating... the compound leaves are long, twiggy and hard to rake up...and it spreads visciously by runners and seeds. There was an Ailanthus in our next door neighbors yard just outside of our bedroom window. I spent hours every summer pulling the invaders from all over my yard.

This next door house was neglected rental property for many years and Ailanthus saplings were growing all along the foundation of the house. Then it became vacant and after about 6 weeks of no one mowing the lawn the back yard was a miniature forest of trees. Fortunately someone was eventually hired to keep the lawn mowed.

New homeowners moved in. After about a year we finally decided to ask them if we could have the tree removed. I told them all about Ailanthus (which is considered a noxious weed) and they gave us permission to have it cut down. Of course they were not interested in helping to pay for it.

We paid $1000 to have the tree removed and it was the best money we ever spent. They moved out shortly after that and then my husband cut down all the saplings along the foundation of the house and sprayed the stumps with round up. That really helped but there are still some coming back. Somehow we have to make sure a tree is not allowed to mature over there again.

Could some of you be mistaking Ailanthus for Sumac? When young they really do look alike but you can tell them apart for sure by the smell of crushed leaves and twigs.
chris_h
Waukegan, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 10, 2009
5:32 AM

Post #6667211

Oh, I meant to apologize for diverting from the topic. Sorry.
mamasita
Southern Dutchess Co, NY
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2009
12:51 PM

Post #6667813

I am 99.99% sure what I have is the staghorn sumac, since they are quite prevalent here. It is more shrub-like and not as full as the picture I saw of the Ailanthus altissima. I will examine them more closely, but with those red clusters forming in the summer and fall, I'm thinking this is what we have.
chris_h
Waukegan, IL
(Zone 5a)

June 10, 2009
1:44 PM

Post #6667974

Oh, for sure, if they have the red velvety "flowers" and seeds you've got Staghorn Sumac. I should have thought of that. It's so obvious.

I was thinking about that garden I volunteered at the college. In the large central garden we always had babies from the nearby walnut trees, Ailanthus, and Sumac. When I was weeding the only way I could tell them apart for sure was by the smell of the crushed leaves when I pulled them out.

So I'm still fascinated that the Sumac I see in gardens around me doesn't seem to be that aggressive. But after the warnings I've seen here, I am not tempted to try one in my garden. I'll just admire the neighbor's.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

June 10, 2009
2:24 PM

Post #6668107

Mine are definitely sumac. I own a nursery, and am pretty much up on my plants, LOL. Red velvety flowers and seeds here too.
winterrobin
South Dennis, NJ
(Zone 7b)

June 11, 2009
3:25 AM

Post #6671574

Maybe there are different strains of sumac around the country, and I must have the most polite, mild mannered ones. I have four slender trunks that have been on my property forever, and they have NEVER spread, never overstepping their bounds, which is at the edge of a wooded area. The birds love the deep burgundy fruits. My only complaint is that the branches are bare and homely until mid-May. It's very late to leaf out. I'm thinking of sending a rambling rose up the trunks.

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