New Twins

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

My Dwarf goats had new Twin girls.We're really happy. That made 6 for us so daddy goat had to go to a neighbor's pasture to prevent any more. Was working in my plants and found a funny looking frog with gold color UNDER it's back legs. It's probably some kind of tree frog, but never saw one with yellow/gold color on under side. What do I have? (OH, baby twins names are Holly and Mistletoe)

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Lewisville, MN(Zone 4a)

I thought we were going to see a picture of baby goats!

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

I couldn't put 2 pictures in and really wanted to know what kind of frog it was, but here is the babies picture.Mistletoe and Holly

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Lebanon, OR

Little Pigmy goats how cute:)

D

Lewisville, MN(Zone 4a)

Thank you.
So cute, will they stay cute as they are dwarfs ?

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

The mom and dad are. Here is proud moma.

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Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

Cute twins. We also have pygmy goats. Your darker one looks like our 'Donald'. His mom and twin were killed a couple of years ago by wild dogs. We raised him on a bottle so he's definitely a keeper. Here is one of our recent babies, Lulu, who is now about 4 weeks old. Mom Rosie is with her.

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Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

Here is 'The Donald', all grown up now.

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Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

Donald looks just like Patrick. He was raised on a bottle and was born on st.patricks day. Patrick is the daddy of the twin girs. We love our babies. We have one from the white moma,(Hannah) and Patrick a couple years ago we named Baby Jingles. She wore a jingle bell when she was little so I could always hear her and would know where she was. They are quite small even for pigmy goats. My dog is bigger than they are. They are only about knee high.

Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

Ours are about knee high too. Some yearlings are even smaller. The exception is our oldest female, Gizmo, who is a little longer and bigger. The white female we had (Donald's mom), was a bit smaller than Giz. Donald has always been on the smallish side and I always thought it was because he was bottle fed, but maybe our strain is just getting smaller. Which is fine with us.

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

Ours are staying smaller. Each baby is just a bit smaller than mom or dad.

Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

Our newest!! He was born yesterday to one of our young moms, Jessica. She is really small and this little one is very tiny but feisty already. We haven't named him for sure yet, but he may be Marvin. We usually let our grandkids help pick out the names.

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Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

OH, how sweet! I think it is adorable. I got attached to goats a while back when I use to bottle feed babys for a professor at Clemson University. He raised Boar goats and I bottle fed the babys when there was 2 or more so one could stay with the mom and get more milk. We kept the baby goat with our little dogs and they played together and some of the little goats thought they were dogs. We even had one that barked. That was amazing. Then after weaned they went back to the herd and I'd miss the little ones, so we got some little ones to stay little and they're like part of the family. I couldn't bare to part with them. They are so sweet. They are a lot of company for me.

Biggs, KY(Zone 6a)

Hubba Hubba, Donald! He is a handsome dude. I would like to have a pygmy to milk. They say it's the closest to cow's milk. Do any of you milk your goats? I have a little milk bucket but no goat.

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

No, not any more. I got my first one to milk because my baby had allergys to milk and was hurting her kidneys. But she is grown now and I just like my babys. They keep the grass and weeds eat back so it doesnt get snakey out there. They are my lawnmowers, and I don't have to worry about hitting stumps with them. They even work on weekends and hollidays.

Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

I'll just have to ditto what mekos just said. We have never milked ours...got them more for the 'lawnmower' factor, but some of them have become more like pets too. And they allow us to declare our place a farm for tax purposes.

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

OOWWOOO. Didn't know you could do that with the taxes. I might have to check into it.

Biggs, KY(Zone 6a)

Mekos
Does the milk taste close to cow's milk. I'd like to make cheese from it.

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

Now I hear it makes great cheese. However I never tried it. I did make butter from cow's milk , but never tried anything with goat milk.

Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

Mekos, You do have to do a little paperwork and keep records and receipts for the farm declaration. We show a 'loss' most years, but this year we sold 2 goats so far to keep our herd down, and plan to sell a couple more later, so this should make the IRS happy. It helps to be able to deduct your feed, fence material/maintenance, and a lot of other things. But also check into it with your insurance agent. Sorry it took me so long to respond. But it is a bit of a savings for the property in general.

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

I may check into that.

Shippensburg, PA

I had a couple of milk goats, a Nubian and an Alpine. The milk is wonderful and when properly cared for tastes like milk...no off or odd taste unless there is something in the pasture that flavors it. The fat molecule in goats milk is too small to separate like cow's milk does (for cream and butter) unless you buy an expensive machine to separate the fat out, but goat cheese is excellent and the milk is easier to digest than cow's milk.

The babies are adorable...how tiny! I miss our spring lambs. Tell me, how hard is it to fence those little guys? Fencing a goat can be a headache...they are capricious and I found them difficult to fence securely without making expensive changes. Of course they think it's all a game, lol.

This message was edited Jun 16, 2009 11:36 PM

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

I went to Lowes and bought a few rolls of 4 ft tall-100 ft long- fence, and some metal post ,and wire ties, and started driving posts in the ground and went rollong fence along the post line. Just like putting up the fence in the back yard. They are about knee high and are quite content. We built a small deck so they could climb and play on and can get up off the wet ground sometimes. They have 2 dog houses and a barrell to play on or go in. Very easy and no problems.

Biggs, KY(Zone 6a)

Would a single strand of electric wire about a foot or so high keep them away from the outer fence wire?

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

Probably would, but I've never needed it, and they don't bother my fence.

Shippensburg, PA

Thanks for the information Mekos. They sound much easier to fence than a regular sized milk goat. I have an area about 2 acres that a couple of these little guys, to clear brush along with a couple of Guinea Hens, for ticks might be a workable plan.

I have a neighbor down the road that has these little guys, guess I need to go introduce myself and learn something about them.

As hard as it is to think about they would be a nice size for meat for a small family as well.

I wonder if that might work Cajun. I haven't decided if I want another milk goat or good milch cow. Each has it's advantages...but that's for another thread. I'll keep the electric fence idea in mind. I don't want to re-fence everything here as it's set up mostly for horses and sheep...and cows....

Biggs, KY(Zone 6a)

Goats would work for us because we have so much hilside that can't be used otherwise.

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

What ever you decide on with the fence line, consider all the wild animals that might try to come in a nd kill the little goats and eat them, and they can't defend themselves. That is why I put up regular fence. We have wild coyotes and they would kill the babies if no fence protection was there. These little ones are content where ever you put them, but the wild stuff outside is what to worry about. Can you keep those threats OUT from them with electric fence. Some can jump over the fence and some could climb under it. For me, I felt this was the safest thing for them. And I can increase the size of the area fenced, a little at a time, until I get all I want fenced in. We started with half acre, now got 1 acre and soon will go another half acre for the summer, and this fall add another half acre. We just increase a little at a time, so it's not expensive and they have plenty to eat and keeps the unwanted stuff under control. You don't have to do it all at once.

Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

I totally agree with Mekos on the fencing height. You need to keep the predators, especially coyotes or wild dogs, out. We had some wild dogs roaming in our 'hood a couple of years ago that killed a total of 5 of ours in the span of a couple of weeks. Our neighbor (our fences border) also lost 5 and he has (or had - he got rid of all of them recently) the larger goats. They are all defenseless. We sort of blamed our neighbor because he had a not-so-well-maintained fence and his large goats had bent our fence in a few places. The dogs (we saw the pack of 5) got in their fence and then got under the fence between our properties and killed ours. Coyotes can do the same. DH has since put up barbed wire on the top and bottom of the fence. We also used a little 'varmint control' with the county to get rid of the wild dogs. But mitigation saves a lot of heartbreak. If you are so inclined, I hear that having a donkey or mule in the pasture with the goats deters the dogs or coyotes.

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

That is so true. Donkeys will protect the other animals in with them when ever possible. That is a great idea if you have access to one. ALSO a great white pyramese(spelled that wrong) but it's a dog that Protects it's family it lives with. Around here all the big farms have them that have sheep or goats. Two can take on a pack of wild dogs or coyotes and not get hurt. They have very thick hair and are bred and trained to care for what it's raised with. They are about as good as a gun.

Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

I've heard that too about the Great Pyrennes (I'm not sure I spelled it right either). We used to have some neighbors with a male and female. And they are huge. Probably have to float a loan to feed them!!

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

No actually they eat like all other animals and are on duty 24/7. You feed them out in the field all the time to keep them there and not wandering home to eat.They eat drink and sleep with the animals in the field, so they are one big family.

Biggs, KY(Zone 6a)

I would have a jackass. Nothing can beat them for predator control. But I meant electric WITH regular wire just to keep them from attempting to climb the regulaer wire.

Laceys Spring, AL(Zone 7a)

Wow, Mekos, I didn't know that about the GP's!! If we ever need another dog we might look into that. The ones our former neighbors had puppies just before they moved and they were the cutest little balls of fur!

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

That is what I'm saying, mine don't try to climb the fence. They are content. Never had a problem like that. My fence is just to protect them, they are like little dogs or just little pets, they stay where you put them except for going around to eat grass and brush. When the brush is scarce in the winter, we get hay for them. We usually get the hay in the summer as it's being bailed and it's cheaper then, than going to a feed store for it later, we store it covered until winter when the brush is scarce and feed them through the winter. If you don't want a bunch more gaots, seperate the males from the females. I was told the babies start to breed after about 2 months of age. So if we have male babies, I give them to neighboring farms who have a much larger place for them. We keep the females here so no unplanned or unwanted animals. And if I want to breed one again, go get a male back for 3 weeks and all females old enough to breed will be bred by then.Then take the male back home. We have a system and work together. Larger goats mess up the fences, but these guys don't. A four foot fence is good for them.

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

They are beautiful and a working dog. The hair being so thick protects them and keeps the heat from them also. In the winter it keeps them warm and in summer it's like insulation and helps cool them. When a dog tries to bite them, they get a big mouthful of fur. Also very loyal.

This message was edited Jun 18, 2009 12:08 PM

Shippensburg, PA

My fencing is field fence which would be fine, I've seen foxes walk the line and not go through...unless the gate has a gap. I thought Cajun's suggestion a good one for milk goats...but without testing don't know it it would work.

We had neighbors that let 3 dogs run and when they didn't respond to our request to keep them home they lost one...they kept them home then. I don't tolerate dogs running wild and getting after my animals.

My gelding doesn't put up with dogs and runs them off...head down and ears back. A donkey, mule or ass would be good for pasture protection, along with the Great Pyerenees...Llamas are good pasture protectors as well.

Great Pyerenees,
http://www.dogbreedinfo.com/greatpyrenees.htm


Biggs, KY(Zone 6a)

I hear the GPs bark a lot? What is a good price for the dwarf goat? And is a Dwarf and a Pygmy the same goat?

Fair Play, SC(Zone 7b)

Mine are miniatures of the pigmy breed. I have a male 6 months old that is maybe 12 inches tall. His daddy is knee high and sister is knee high with moma at knee high. One set of twins born in March that is about 6 inches tall.Mine are just smaller than most pigmys. The normal ones are slightly taller than the knees.

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