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Winter Sowing: First Time WS#9 Stayin' Alive, Stayin Alive.....

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LissaD
Corrales, NM
(Zone 7a)

May 16, 2009
2:19 PM

Post #6555906

I am assuming everyone is outside in the garden transplanting the huge amount of plants you wintersowed. ;)

How is it going?

Have you lost plants to transplanting?

How is the weather?

All of the poppies I put out died.. they never got very big in their containers so I am wondering if some of the earliest ones to germinate were kind of "stunted" in their growth. The same thing happended with my spinach. It germinated early and never got more than an inch high. Now it is quite deformed and setting seed in the container still only an inch high. I will have to just try that one again. LOL.

I was starting the massive planting adventure when the main water line for our irrigation broke. So my husband is busy plumbing away so that we don't lose the 4000 square feet of grass we just planted. Then we will be out of town until next Friday.

Is it wrong for annuals to be flowering IN their containers... oops!

Thumbnail by LissaD
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Potagere

May 16, 2009
4:05 PM

Post #6556251

I have "Giant Purple Poppies", courtesy of klstuart. I sowed them 8 Feb, had germination by 13 March, ptransplanted them in HOS to 8 pots on 13 April, and I have now moved some to the garden and have VERY healthy plants; have given others away, and the receipients split them into individual plants before planting in the garden; and all are doing great.

On the other hand, the Escholzia (California Poppies) are a complete failure! Came up early, hated being in the containers, have yellowed and grown stunted. I'll continue to broadcast those in the open in the futire.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 16, 2009
4:41 PM

Post #6556348

Many of my Cal. Poppies have disappeared- stolen by birds. I think they like seedlings for nesting material.

Some of my gaillardia disappeared, too. Only a tiny hole remains where they were plucked out by something..

Karen
Indygardengal
Brownstown, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 16, 2009
5:41 PM

Post #6556539

I too have had a few plants just disappear. The latest (and right now the only one I can recall) is a profusion zinnia. I did fine just the very top of it but the root and stem were gone.
I have transplanted blue flax and it is starting to bloom, red flax looks like it will bloom soon, some scabiosa 'Bianca' which surprised me as it doesn't look at all like the blue scabiosa I had a few years back. The plant is much larger. Terese if you read this is this the way it grows. The leaves look like they might be getting more fine textured but it came up big leaved. I also have some knautia planted but am waiting on it. Wonder if it will bloom and if my soil will suit it. I have clay but my beds are so amended that the clay should not be a problem. Still have some sea holly to plant out but don't know where to put it. Today's article by Todd Boland was informative for me because I was wondering about the round leaves on these as my purchased plant has the cut leaves. About half of my wsing did not germinate.
Potagere

May 16, 2009
7:23 PM

Post #6556840

I just mentioned the poppie because Lissa talked about her problems.

I have now transplanted several HOS of my Mesembryanthemums (Ice Plants) and given several away. Mine would be doing fine if it were not for a renegade Corgi who thinks replacing plants with bones is good gardening etiquette. We are working on this.

Lots of Cosmos have gone into my and friends' gardens by now. We will await results.

Joanna's Larkspur are going to be in many gardens this summer: the seed was SO GOOD. It is going to be interesting to see how it does under a variety of garden conditions.

"Poached Egg Plant" is my "ground cover du jour" this year. It germinated really well and I and several friends are busy planting the transplants.

klstuart's Giant Purple Poppy, even though she said she could send me only a few seeds, have been prolific, and I and several others are now waiting for it to bloom.

Echinacea "Paradiso" will grow in my garden and that of others this year, although I suspect it won't bloom this year.

I've transplanted several Monardas and Agastaches and am waiting to see.

[Edited for spelling.]

This message was edited May 17, 2009 10:42 AM

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 16, 2009
11:52 PM

Post #6557566

i dont have my notes in front of me... but from memory [which fades easily]

i planted out 2 'wild cherry' tomato ... both eaten by some critter, along with 1 'desert 4-O'Clock

I also think 1 or 2 Red Flax has disappeared ... i think the neighbors dog was out there trompsing around.

I've planted out some Indian Summer BES, Merlot Coneflowers, Tunic Flower, Grey Mist MG [hope the bunnies didnt eat them] a few clumps of Golden Jubliee, about 7 Scarlet Milkweeds, 2 Bronze Fennel. and all the Yvonne Salvia seeds i had [9] .. there were some other plants.. i just cant think of them right now.

I have a HUGE chia of Fever Few that i have to figure out what to do with.

I'll be home on monday and i'll be a planting fool for about 2.5 days ... i'll be bringing up some agastache and other Butterfly & Bee attracting plants when i come back up.

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 17, 2009
1:59 PM

Post #6559620

I have larkspur in 2 different spots. One is doing well and growing, the other I have put seedlings out twice and something is eating or taking them. I still have some left in the jug so will try replacing again. I have lost a few of the rudbeckia's due to the hard rain wew have had it look like.

My dill & parsley are sad looking but I will plant the this week to see if that helps them!

My 2 Bronze Fennel look good. Hope to get some of my Lady In Red salvia out this week.

My zinnia aren't big enough yet to put out.

4 Swamp Milkweed look good that I have out. Still have more sprouting.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 17, 2009
2:04 PM

Post #6559635

that reminds me... i planted out 2 pink milkweed also. No Lady in Red yet... i forgot to sow them. Ops. I hope there is still time. i can direct sow them.

also put out my celosia wheatstraw ... such a neat lil plant.

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 17, 2009
2:46 PM

Post #6559833

Oh yeah...I planted my 1 zebra mallow and my Cleome...

I just sowed the the Asclepias curassavica last week that you sent me...forgot about it. Hope it's not too late for it!!
sandstreet
Kinderhook, NY
(Zone 5b)

May 17, 2009
9:54 PM

Post #6561576

I could have sworn I planted out 5 Larkspur -- not huge, but about 2" and healthy. Not something that would simply disappear in 4 days without "outside intervention." Now I only have 4. And it's behind a fence, so deer are not culprits ...

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 17, 2009
9:59 PM

Post #6561602

I am transplanting teensy tiny celery and onions while I remember what they are!
sandstreet
Kinderhook, NY
(Zone 5b)

May 17, 2009
10:05 PM

Post #6561632

They're predicting 38 degrees tonight ... is anyone else covering anything up? I've never taken steps to protect anything before, and I'm uncertain if I should ...

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 17, 2009
10:16 PM

Post #6561675

I don't think WS stuff needs to be babied any more than it did in Jan. or March.
LissaD
Corrales, NM
(Zone 7a)

May 17, 2009
10:27 PM

Post #6561732

I planted out my Lavatera Silver Cup and it was very healthy. I woke up this morning and something had nibbled all the top leaves off. I took one of the tops of my milk jugs and just staked it over the tiny plant so that maybe the lower leaves will have a chance to fill in. What a pain, and I have no idea what could be eating it!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 18, 2009
12:37 AM

Post #6562260

Bummer that it's yummy!
nanniepb
Cumberland Mtns, TN
(Zone 6b)

May 19, 2009
2:33 AM

Post #6568068

Ive been offline for the most part with my dad whose gall bladder ruptured and had complications with that. Two days before this happened, I transplanted several jugs into my garden and had enough left over to make almost 3 trays of transplants.I took one to my dad's and planted them and the rest were doing well until this past saturday. My momma cat for whom I made a safe haven away from the 3 neighborhood dogs, had her 4 week old kittens on the back porch playing. Didnt register...the next morning when i went out, the kittens had demolished my transplants...many I had planted in styrafoam cups. now shredded. upside down. dirt EVERYWHERE. its funny now, but when I vented to my dad I threatned to make cat soup.

During his stay at the hospital I had a bad case of poison ivy from pulling up vines, so today my dad actually drove over to spray for me because I seem to have a block where poison ivy is and every year he has to show me. seriously. so he saw my wintersowing jugs for the first time. He told me that he had been sceptic, that he really didnt think it would work, but he hasnt quit bragging yet about the bulk of flowers I have! ha ha we never get too old to get that seal of approval from our Dads, do we?

I have to say my poppies were weak too. My lavender is amazing. strong healthy. my larkspur is great. Ive given tarragon, cardinal climber, delphinium, columbine, rose campion, away. and there is still so much that needs to be planted but I missed several good planting days while i was at the hospital and now its rain, rain, rain, again. I'm not giving up.
my herbs in freezer bags are full...tomatoes need sunlight as do my peppers. thats all I can remember @ 10:30pm. time to quit gardening for the day =)
LissaD
Corrales, NM
(Zone 7a)

May 19, 2009
5:36 AM

Post #6568749

I seriously have to take a picture of these poor deformed poppies. I looked out there today at the poppies I sill have in their container and I do believe they are trying to BLOOM! They are not more than 2 in high and most of them not even that, but they never really got big enough to transplant. I think I have the bonsai poppy experiment going on here. LOL. They are getting a fuzzy nobby head on them that looks just like a poppy should look, only smaller.

Nannie, I hope your Dad is doing better and there is no more poison ivy for you to deal with. We don't have any out here, I have actually never seen poison ivy in my whole life.

The very best results have come from the plain old milk jugs.

I LOVE the 2.5 gallon water containers that are big and square. I think it gives them just the right amount of filtered light. The seeds I sowed in the hard plastic juice containers did well for the most part, but they do produce hot spots and fried a bunch of little seedlings. Most of my milk jugs had beautiful foliage and produced very healthy plants.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 19, 2009
11:05 AM

Post #6569033

Can't beat milk jugs. I use only those and 2 liters.

Karen
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

May 19, 2009
1:45 PM

Post #6569573

Lissa, I had something like that happen with Poppies a couple of years ago. I think it had something to do with staying in the container too long, and weather getting too warm. Mine had little deformed blooms in the jug, and didn't recover when set out. I think Poppies need to be set out when they're pretty tiny to work well.
LissaD
Corrales, NM
(Zone 7a)

May 19, 2009
2:09 PM

Post #6569654

All of the ones I put out a while ago were just little tiny and they all died. I thought I would see if these got a little bigger, but look at them. You can see the size of the plant marker in there. LOL. Of course I am going to be gone for 3 days now out of town so I may miss the end result here, we will see.

Thumbnail by LissaD
Click the image for an enlarged view.

LissaD
Corrales, NM
(Zone 7a)

May 19, 2009
2:11 PM

Post #6569664

On a more positive note, we replanted a whole yard of grass and I was watering it this morning. It is going to be amazing when it all fills in.

Thumbnail by LissaD
Click the image for an enlarged view.

nanniepb
Cumberland Mtns, TN
(Zone 6b)

May 21, 2009
5:04 PM

Post #6579255

thanks. my Dad is doing great! a good friend sent a bar of Burt's Bee poison ivy soap in the mail. I hope I dont have to use it. I ended up buying Zanfill which helped more than anything. its pricey but I got results from one washing. Ive lived here 4 years, cleaned out the same flower beds each year and thought I was immune to it till this year.

Well, I couldn't stop. I sowed more this week: 4 kinds of sweet peppers that Klstuart gave me last fall, another round of garlic chives, and cilantro. something I got from ebay called jessamine, i think, and a tray of mexican sunflowers. I think thats all for the year.

I had a good bit of of kinds of heirloom tomato seeds, but only about 6-10 of each kind. So I used two liter soda bottles and tried some of the green colored ones as well. I have to say the green ones didnt do well...I got straggly, leggy plants. Ive been lucky so far and haven't had to water any of my jugs but I gave the tomatoes a dose of fish emulsion and left them opened up. I decided I will wait a few more days till the temperatures are warmer at night on a consistent basis, not like the 36 and 38 degrees we had earlier this week.

milk jugs still rock. i had less results in the freezer bags. keeping them up was the hardest part. I'll try to take the camera with me and show you how 'messy' they look. ha ha I guess results is more important than looks.

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 21, 2009
6:25 PM

Post #6579608

Well something..I think the bunnies.. ate my milkweed babies. aargh!! AND the Zebra Mallow is gone...

AT least my cleome, larkspur, salvia, fennel and rudbeckias are hanging in there!!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 21, 2009
7:26 PM

Post #6579805

Hooray for your cleome, larkspur, salvia, fennel and rudbeckias!

How is it that we have a "nannie" and a "nanny"? My DD's name is Nancy and we call her "Nan" and then "Nanny" sometimes. She's 15 -- you two are probably older than 15. ^_^

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 21, 2009
7:29 PM

Post #6579816

:) yeah..just a little!! I have 2 GD's(sisters) one calls me nana and the other calls me nanny..go figure!!

It does make me have to pay attention to the post! lol

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 21, 2009
7:36 PM

Post #6579845

Funny...
nanniepb
Cumberland Mtns, TN
(Zone 6b)

May 22, 2009
10:12 PM

Post #6584461

and my name is Phyllis, LOL. i always look twice too because I think I am nannie and am 54

my g'kids call me nannie.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 24, 2009
8:00 AM

Post #6590110

I wonder what my grandchildren will call me...? (My daughters are 15 and 18.) My step-grandchildren (who have known me their entire lives) call me Carrie.

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 24, 2009
2:34 PM

Post #6590790

I hadn't really given it any thought...but after the GD was born. Somebody at worked asked me what I was...grandma, nana, etc. and then our DH asked us both what we wanted to be called...which I thought was really nice of her. Never mind what all she had just put us all thru!! (18 & still in school.. the dad in jail...blah blah)

Nana just had a nice safe, comfy feel to it for me...and I wanted that baby to be safe & comfy.

I planted out my sunflowers yesterday...I am running out of room and still have some stuff in jugs...not good!! LOL

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 24, 2009
4:44 PM

Post #6591233

I never had a Nana, but I had a Grandma and a Ma. (Ma was not like Maw and Paw, it was a very elegant abbreviation for Grandma, so I guess it really should have been 'Ma!) Grandma has a lot of other associations for me, and Nanny is what we call my daughter Nancy,

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 24, 2009
6:20 PM

Post #6591483

I am no where near ready to be called Gramma or anything close to that... we have told our kids that too... "Not ready for Grandkids."

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 24, 2009
7:56 PM

Post #6591795

Hence I am Carrie to my husband's grandchildren.
nanniepb
Cumberland Mtns, TN
(Zone 6b)

May 26, 2009
5:47 AM

Post #6598671

Well, I asked to be called 'Nannie' when my DD got preg.
thats only because she wouldnt let her kids call me Grand-MaMa (you know, said with an accent like Grey Poupon) lol

my dgk are from Atlanta, GA so when they say it, its real slow and sounds like Nan-eeeee. the youngest loves to call me Phyllis, like he's really pulling something over my head.

gotta love em' . and you can always send them back home



carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 26, 2009
11:49 AM

Post #6599016

We're not talking about WSing any more, and it's all my fault! Sorry . . .

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 26, 2009
1:12 PM

Post #6599253

Something is eating well on all my babies...about a third of what I plante dout saturdy is now gone!!!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2009
1:33 PM

Post #6599324

nanny -- i think it was last year, when i posted about disappearing seedlings... someone commented that birds will eat them too. i had originally blamed the bunnies... though i do have a lot of squirrels too.

I'm away for a few weeks... i hope when i get back in June i still have some plants left.

yesterday i planted some Honey Bee White, Agastache and some Verbena Bonn.
I hope they do well in part sun. I think they get a bit in the afternoon... cant check today as we are cloudy, but i just checked and they have perked back up again after being planted.
I gave one of the Lavatera Silver Cup to one of my lady friends up here... she's excited about it... even said she didnt care if it didnt bloom, since she loves the foliage.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 26, 2009
2:06 PM

Post #6599446

Have a good trip, Theresa!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2009
2:58 PM

Post #6599656

Carrie... oh, it's just fabulous... .just me and the pooch.[we're in an RV park in Lake Delton, WI ] I hang out with Sr citizens all day... we play bingo on weekends, cards during the week -- eat out a lot... though since i'm by myself... friends keep inviting me over for dinner.
DH will be up here in about a week.

I get to garden all day long if i want. But i'm doing 2 common areas with plants ... some of them are my WS plants.
I will do before and after shots of the "Flag Pole" bed where i'm yanking the Lily of the Valley and attempting a butterfly garden. If the rain holds off today... i'll get some of it done.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 26, 2009
3:53 PM

Post #6599874

Sounds like aot of fun!!!

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 26, 2009
5:22 PM

Post #6600186

You are right...Theresa...could be birds especially out in the garden area!
countrymouse5A
Plymouth, IN
(Zone 5a)

May 26, 2009
6:15 PM

Post #6600417

I just transplanted the poppies over the weekend that I had winter sowed. They've been out two days and at least are still there and alive so far! I just hope they perk up and I didn't get them out too late.

Melanie

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

May 26, 2009
6:49 PM

Post #6600544

I put my Yvonne's Salvia out today...hope nothing eats them! Direct sowed some more sunflowers seeds to replace the ones that got broke.

I have the whole package here...birds, mice, chipmunks, squirrels, rabbits, raccoons & opossums!! So anything could be eating my babies. Just goes with the territory I guess. Told DH now I know why I did so many seeds of everything that I did!! LOL
CrabgrassCentrl
New Milford, CT

May 26, 2009
7:00 PM

Post #6600589

I'm a teensy bit OT here because I want to report on my WS results *and* on transplants. I never posted on the other thread because, well, I was still waiting to see if I would actually have any WS results to post. This is my first time with WS.

I had 18 jugs, and 8 had some success ranging from 1 seedling to Chia Pet.

Success:

Digitalis: 2 jugs full of seedlings. The seedlings are perfectly happy where I planted them but haven't grown much.

Strawflower: 2 jugs, 1 seedling each. Seedlings mucho happy in the large container I planted them in. On the other hand, the hundreds of seeds I just dumped in there with them a couple of weeks ago are even happier -- I've got dozens of seedlings there as opposed to just 2 from WS. Hm.

Echinacea: 1 jug, 5-6 seedlings. They're doing OK so far as transplants.

Rudbeckia: 1 jug, 2 seedlings. I only just planted them this weekend because they only came up 2 weeks ago!

Malope: 1 jug/30 seeds, 1 seedling very recently appeared. No action after being transplanted.

Hibiscus mocheutos: 1jug/5 seeds WS, 1 seedling. No action after being transplanted

Big fat failure:

Grape Hyacinth beanvine
Ipomoea alba
Zinnia (several seedlings in March completely vanished by April)
Ratibida columnifera (ditto)
Mirabilis jalapa (ditto)
Astilbe: (ditto)

I guess I'll try again at least one more time, but it was pretty discouraging after reading all the "It's so easy, you won't believe it" posts. For me, it was easy but not very productive! :-(





tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2009
7:33 PM

Post #6600701

CrabGrass... some of the "germinated but then vanished" are more tender annuals... any cold weather could have them bite the dust.

I have learned by failures, that 4-O'clocks, Zinnias and morning glories will keel over if temps dip to low... so i now sow them later in the Spring.

My Mex hats... i only got 1 seedling... not sure what's up with that... though they do direct sow well.

Terese
CrabgrassCentrl
New Milford, CT

May 26, 2009
7:47 PM

Post #6600752

That's what I was afraid of, tcs, thanks for clearing it up for me. I had a bunch of seeds from the "Seeds for Newbies" program, and I just couldn't find enough information on all the different varieties to know what to WS and what not to.

So you sow your tender annuals indoors in the spring, or outdoors, and if outdoors, do you do it directly in the garden? I don't have room to start seeds indoors, so I'm hoping I could do it outdoors somehow if I want stuff like 4 oclocks and zinnias.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2009
8:29 PM

Post #6600928

I tend to direct sow them right in the garden. I have found 4-O'clocks dont like to be transplanted... sometimes i can do it when they are really small, but i also find it almost 'stunts' their growth. ZInnias i have best luck with by direct sowing... i have found the ones sown indoors get too leggy.

my first year, i had no idea what i was doing... but i guess i got lucky and had a lot of germination... though i did lose some plants, including Cosmos and Zins to late frost.

and with the goofy weather we get every year, ya just never know what you're gonna get.

Morning glories... though i did have luck one year WS'ing them... they also do great just popping the seeds right in the ground.

HTH.

Terese
CrabgrassCentrl
New Milford, CT

May 26, 2009
10:57 PM

Post #6601514

Yes, that helps a lot. I'm keeping notes for future reference, and your experiences just got entered. :-) Thanks so much!

Mary
pgt
Chalfont, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 28, 2009
11:19 PM

Post #6611091

Here are my first year ws'ing successes and failures:

Successes:
- Oriental Poppies "Princess Victoria Louise" and "Brilliant Red": transplanted to beds when they got their first set of true leaves (transplanted about 20 of them, and I'd say that 15 of them survived.
- Painted daisies: transplanted to cutting garden, and are doing well. I see flower buds on them - I wasn't expecting flowers until next year!
- Leucanthemum "Crazy Daisy" - transplanted to cutting garden, and looking healthy
- Leucanthemum "Alaska" - transplanted to cutting garden, and looking healthy
- Lupine "The Governor" - I only had a few of these germinate, and I transplanted them to my beds, and they are doing fine.
- Lupine "Gallery Pink" - good germination, and they all look really healthy in the garden.
- Larkspur - transplanted about 30 of them when they got their first true set of leaves. Most of them survived; quite a few got chopped down by rabbits.
- Maiden pinks - transplanted to beds, and look good.
- Dianthus siberian blues: transplanted to bed up in the poconos, don't know how they are doing.
- Mathiola incana - transplanted to bed when they got their first set of true leaves, and they look very healthy.
- Geranium "vision violet" - great germination - look really healthy in their beds.
- Geranium "vision pink" - great germination - look really healthy in their beds.
- Digitalis "excelsior" - great germination, but jug looked like chiapet, and I was overwhelmed with my number of transplants, and I added it to our compost pile
- Digitalis "Camelot Rose" - great germination, transplanted to raised bed, and they are getting big.
- Verbascum "Shades of summer" - transplanted some of them to cutting garden, are growing nicely
- Penstemon "Rocky Mountain Blue" - transplanted to hummingbird garden and garden in poconos, looking good at home, don't know about poconos yet.
- Snapdragons - good germination - transplanted to cutting garden - look healthy
- Echinacea "Prairy Splendor" - good germination - transplanted some to cutting garden, and some to poconos, looking good in cutting garden, don't know about poconos yet.
- Zinnia "pinwheel mix" - transplanted to cutting garden, look good.
- Aquilegia "Blue Barlow" - in pots, looking healthy
- Aquilegia "Coral Star" - in hummingbird garden - still pretty small
- Alchemilla mollis - good germination, but teeny tiny - then I got a lot from a trade, and decided to add jug to compost.
- Verbena bonariensis - transplanted to hummingbird garden, looking nice and big.
- Dames Rocket - good germination, but dumped into compost, b/c I read that it was invasive here.
- Zinnia "Bright Border Mix" - transplanted to cutting garden, look good.
- Thyme - in a mixed herb container, and looking nice.
- rosemary - in a mixed herb container, and looking nice.
- sage - in a mixed herb container, and looking big.
- Zinnia "Envy" - great germination, and in my cutting garden looking healthy
- Sempervivum - great germination, and transplanted to beds, still little, but really cute.
- Astilbe "Bella" - germinated well, but still REALLY tiny.
- Sweet Alyssum - germinated well, but they were so cheap at the nurseries, I think that next year I'll just buy them at the nurseries.


Things that didn't germinate for me:
- texas blue bonnet - a bust
- Cypress vine - a bust

Phew, since I transplanted these a while ago, I kind of forgot how much I had wintersown. Since most of them are perennials, I'm anxious to see them next year, when they bloom. I'm a big fan of winter sowing - was a great experience.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 29, 2009
12:04 AM

Post #6611326

Good job - congratulations!!!

tcs1366

tcs1366
Leesburg, FL
(Zone 9a)

May 29, 2009
2:36 AM

Post #6612039

Cypress Vine has been duds for me 2 yrs running.

I wont be home for another week to 10 days or so... i'll check my pots, but i dont have high hopes for any... but i do recall the Hostas germinated very late for me... so those i wont dump til the end of summer.


pgt -- WOW... great job!!
LissaD
Corrales, NM
(Zone 7a)

June 11, 2009
9:54 PM

Post #6674890

NO way! I had given up on about 20 containers that didn't germinate. Hadn't even been watering them any more. I am busy planting out all my others. Well we had about 4 hours of rain the other night and wouldn't you know it up popped the Cypress Vine and Moon Vine and Lavendar moon vine. How about that.

Are you planning to save your seed? Trade your seeds? Wintersow again next year?

Thought I would just see what you guys are up to.
JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

June 12, 2009
5:39 AM

Post #6676798

I still have about 50 containers that didn't germinate (out of 400), I will leave them for another week and than give up.
But I will wintersow next year again. There were a lot of successes and the ones who didn't germinate might not have germinated inside too. Some annuals, like Snapdragon and 4-Oçlocks, germinated too late to get plants this season, so I will sow them indoors next year.
I try to save seeds from all my plants for trading and selling.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2009
11:12 AM

Post #6677115

Jonna: I don't know how your weather and mine compare, but snapdragons sometimes survive winter for me. Last year I lost most, but the winter before that they all survived. So if you have those snap babies, you might want to plant them out and hope for the best. Maybe, if you leave them in the ground over winter, they will survive to next year. Second year plants are wonderful- bigger, taller, stronger, and longer blooming.

Karen
JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

June 12, 2009
11:36 AM

Post #6677158

Thanks for your advise about the snapdragons. Do you protect them in winter, or just leave them as they are?
Jonna
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2009
12:58 PM

Post #6677366

Jonna: I mulch all of my beds with fall leaves. But, honestly, most of it blows away before spring. Snapdragons are just very hardy to cold weather.

This past winter we had several longer periods (days) of below zero temps before we had any snow cover to insulate things. I suspect that's when a lot of the snapdragons were lost. But I do have a LOT of volunteers coming up. This photo shows a patch of volunteers on May 17. Some I transplanted to other spots. They pop up in other beds, too, where I've never planted snaps.

Karen

Thumbnail by kqcrna
Click the image for an enlarged view.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2009
1:39 PM

Post #6677474

I'm still trying to keep the stuff that germinated in trays alive long enough to remember what it is and plant it out. I planted out a lot of lupines the other day. I resolved not to WS so much. Then I ordered more seeds!
Potagere

June 12, 2009
2:55 PM

Post #6677849

You and me both, Carrie!
JonnaSudenius

(Zone 6b)

June 12, 2009
4:27 PM

Post #6678289

Karen, I never had volunteers of snapdragons. Maybe I must get seed from someone in zone 6 or colder. Where I live is a very small zone 6, the rest of the country is 7 or 8a, so everything I can buy here is not really used to temperatures below zero in winter.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 12, 2009
7:04 PM

Post #6678700

Jim, it's a recurring episode.
echinaceamaniac
(Clint) Medina, TN
(Zone 7b)

June 12, 2009
8:13 PM

Post #6678948

I just scatter poppy seeds on a flower bed and they come up and bloom the next spring. I don't know if this still counts as winter sowing though. I don't think they like being fooled with too much.

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

June 18, 2009
9:01 PM

Post #6707255

For all the seeds that I sowed and sprouted not much has survived once planted...kind of bummed!
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 18, 2009
9:06 PM

Post #6707285

Sorry to hear that, Nanny. What happened? A late freeze or something? Flood?

Karen

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2009
12:37 AM

Post #6708182

Still haven't planted out all i sowed. I love the jiffy-sow concept, of the trays with plastic lids, but the crap they use for starting mix only holds together if it's totally root-bound.

nanny_56

nanny_56
Putnam County, IN
(Zone 5b)

June 19, 2009
2:24 AM

Post #6708720

They just seemed to keep getting ate by critters, drowned/beat up by rain or simply dying. It is a really bad year here with rain every day or two this year.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2009
9:43 AM

Post #6709517

We're getting rain most every day, too. Today, 94 degrees.

Karen
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2009
11:57 AM

Post #6709695

I lost a lot of seedlings to bugs and slugs this year too, I'd say about 1/4 of my containers. It worked out fine since I started way to much anyway, so I've still been able to plant all the beds I intended to.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2009
12:21 PM

Post #6709747

Raining today, for example. mosquito bugs are having a party.
jadajoy
Newport News, VA
(Zone 11)

June 19, 2009
6:59 PM

Post #6711448

I just found this thread. You guys have some great success stories. Poppies wont grow for me either. Even the ones I bought in full bloom died...My soil is very acidic thou.

I didnt WS this year but I had all those failed milk jugs from last winter full of dirt in the shed and I needed soil, so I took all that soil and put it in a long tray to use for other plants and wouldnt you know, I have all kinds of stuff coming up now. I did this in March so maybe they like it better this year? Problem is, I dont have a clue what is what until they flower.
I know one is penstemon and some asters and some cleome. I would conclude that those seeds are very, very viable and can take neglect.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2009
8:54 PM

Post #6711840

That's great news, jadajoy. Maybe there's still some hope for all my unsprouted jugs too!
jadajoy
Newport News, VA
(Zone 11)

June 19, 2009
10:11 PM

Post #6712116

I would say so. Gather them up and see what happens.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2009
10:18 PM

Post #6712148

Joyce, this year's been SO wet up here . . . it really changed what made it and what didn't.
jadajoy
Newport News, VA
(Zone 11)

June 19, 2009
10:33 PM

Post #6712199

Carrie
Yea, all that spring rain was a little much. It stayed cool here longer than usual too. That might have been a factor.

But do certain seeds grow better when planted later in the year?

Or if planted earlier, just stay dormant till it's their time?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 19, 2009
10:40 PM

Post #6712231

Yes, but I certainly can't tell you which is which! Anita keeps incredible records.
tabasco
Cincinnati (Anderson, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 21, 2009
1:00 PM

Post #6718268

Can't believe all the good successes everyone has had. Even the first year newbies! (I wish I had WSed more perennials again this year so I am lusting after your reports and taking notes on your experiences for next year!)

And I agree, it's true too around here (zone 6) about the tender annuals (i.e., zinnias) that WSing in the fall/winter may be premature for them. It may be more successful to spring plant the seeds in the garden if you aren't pestered by too many critters and weird weather.

Or better for us (because of the wet springs and critters), to plant my tender annual seeds in those plastic covered vegetable containers in May/early June, keep them in a warm spot until they germinate and then set the semi-covered containers out in a protected spot (like under a bush next to the house) 'til a bit bigger. Then transplant into the garden when ready. Kind of a 'spring' version of wintersowing for 'tender annuals'.

This works very well for me, and I have more seedling zinnias, sunflowers, tithonia, clarkia than I can use here this year. Of course, it took me three years of learning a little bit about seed sowing before I figured out the timing for our particular garden.

And one important note for this approach : I did scrutinize the seed packets for varieties that had shorter 'days to bloom' time to be sure that I'll have bloom before the end of our gardening season here. (For instance some sunflowers have a shorter cycle than others).

It is fun to read about all your successes! (And so sorry, didn't mean to go on so long here.) t.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 21, 2009
3:42 PM

Post #6718828

Oh, Tabasco, your list reminded me of what I DIDN'T sow this year but loved last year: clarkia! Darn it!
nanniepb
Cumberland Mtns, TN
(Zone 6b)

June 23, 2009
9:25 PM

Post #6728651

I didnt really do a good job of keeping my spreadsheet updated but I am beyond pleased with my output. I could have done a better job thining and transplanting in the early stages, but I had as much as I could plant. At first, I was planting only 2 or 3 sprigs of each kind, repotting the rest to share but now I wish I had kept more. On the last of these, Ive been overwhelmed and potting the whole jug.

All in all, my transplants have done beautifully. I think the excessive amount of rain helped with that. it's also hindered me in getting things out earlier, but Ive been getting them out pretty much in the order I sowed them, which was in 4 or 5 groups. \I'm down to Herbs now. One of the things that I learned was that I didn't need every kind of Basil, nor does anyone else. its hard to give it away!

Today I found a jug that I thought was empty and been shifting it around to the back but found that it had 3 tiny plants that were smaller than a quarter. maybe half that size actually. But the color was so bright. It was Hypoestes - Confetti Mix. what a surprise.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 23, 2009
10:20 PM

Post #6728868

Congratulations!!! Sounds great!
LissaD
Corrales, NM
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2009
12:06 AM

Post #6729268

Some of my plants got a little deformed or stunted I think because I wasn't available to plant them out when they were ready. We had a wedding this spring and it really messed up the timetable. I am hoping some of the perennials will fill in nicer when they come back next year. They look a little straggly this year!

I have some that I put in the ground a month ago and they haven't grown at all... I am beginning to wonder. Do you think they are OK?
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 24, 2009
12:12 PM

Post #6731191

Lissa, what plants have just sat there since you planted them? I have a few perennials that did that the first year, like blue flax- stayed tiny last year, but bloomed beautifully (at full size) this year. For a lot of plants, that old saying is quite true- "first year they sleep, second year they creep, third year they leap".
bobyrd
Conroe, TX
(Zone 9a)

June 24, 2009
2:25 PM

Post #6731593

I am hoping that happens to mine. Only about 50% of my WS containers germinated. Of the ones I planted out the ones that survived are mostly growing really slow and I don't know if they are going to bloom. Of course it could be because of the drought we are having. I don't remember when it rained the last time and it is so dry and brown . It is hardly ever brown and dry in Houston.
Potagere

June 24, 2009
3:47 PM

Post #6731988

Oh, Gemini, you make my heart leap! I LOVE Blue Flax, but my WS ones are so almost feeble that I was thinking of composting them. I will now try to have some patience and wait on them.
LissaD
Corrales, NM
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2009
4:21 PM

Post #6732135

LOL, Blue flax is definitely one of them. The amaranthus that I thought was supposed to be fairly tall is still about 2inches high, milkweed varieties, corepsis which I thought was an annual, so I don't know if it will do anything!

We have had fairly low temps, like in the 70-85 range, which is VERY unusual for this zone. Usually we are well into the 90s by now. So maybe they don't really go for it until it warms up.

gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 24, 2009
8:08 PM

Post #6733174

Jim, my blue flax looked so tiny and pathetic last year. I don't think they got over 2" tall. This is what one "hunk o seedlings" looked like in April- they must have growing roots last year.

Thumbnail by gemini_sage
Click the image for an enlarged view.

gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 24, 2009
8:12 PM

Post #6733189

Here's some of the first blooms. That clump ultimately reached about 2 1/2' tall, and nearly as wide. Loads of seeds are ripening now :-)

Thumbnail by gemini_sage
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 24, 2009
9:54 PM

Post #6733624

Blue flax is definitely a tough plant, so have faith. Generally you can ignore them once established. Don't let those delicate looking flowers fool you.

Gemini_sage: I usually don't wait for seeds. I give the thing a haircut after the first round of bloom, then it will rebloom later in summer.

Karen
gemini_sage
Winchester, KY
(Zone 6a)

June 25, 2009
12:16 PM

Post #6735986

Karen, do you think its too late for me to do that now that seeds are ripening? Heck, I'm behind on deadheading the stuff I meant to, LOL.
kqcrna
Cincinnati, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 25, 2009
2:56 PM

Post #6736663

I don't know if you still have time. I'd deadhead most seeds, leave a few stems of seeds to ripen if you wish. Then collect those seeds as soon as they're ready, and cut back. Chances are they'd bloom again, at least some, in late summer. Probably not nearly as much as the first show of flowers, though, mine don't anyway.

My feeling is this: I can always buy more seeds if I have to.

Karen

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Other Winter Sowing Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Winter Sowing Seed Swap .....part 2 alicewho 213 Mar 23, 2007 1:01 PM
Lessons learned for next year #2 zenpotter 256 Mar 23, 2007 7:56 AM
Milk jugs TurtleChi 99 Mar 19, 2007 12:20 PM
WS Poppies & transplant problems marie_ 100 May 11, 2011 4:44 PM
Database germination info bluespiral 6 Mar 5, 2008 12:23 PM


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