Photo by Melody

Plant Identification: ID: is this wild strawberry?

Communities > Forums > Plant Identification
bookmark
Forum: Plant IdentificationReplies: 18, Views: 177
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
greenbunny
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 25, 2009
10:20 PM

Post #6596809

This has started spreading over the east side of our yard, and someone mentioned they thought it looked like strawberry. We can't eat anything out of our toxic soil, but could leave for animals until i have something else to plant there if that's what it is.

Can you help id this please? Thanks!

Peace,
Carrie Anne, aka the Green Warrior Bunny

Thumbnail by greenbunny
Click the image for an enlarged view.

RachelLF

RachelLF

May 26, 2009
12:49 AM

Post #6597462

Look's like wild Strawberry to me. Did you notice a bloom by chance?

Rachel

Resin

Resin
Northumberland
United Kingdom
(Zone 9a)

May 26, 2009
8:36 AM

Post #6598761

Not a strawberry; maybe a species of Geum (which is related, but doesn't have edible fruit)

Resin
Malus2006
Coon Rapids, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 26, 2009
12:07 PM

Post #6599055

I agree with resin - there is a short stem - wild strawberry only emerge from the crown.
greenbunny
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 26, 2009
1:51 PM

Post #6599382

resin, i think you're right again! the leaves look like "Geum chiloense" but I don't ever recall seeing flowers. probably b/c there's so much stuff in this area, that this got overtaken and either i just didn't see it or it didn't get there.

i'll post another pic when we get a flower... thanks!
jimmytomfarm
Hatchechubbee, AL

May 29, 2009
9:50 AM

Post #6612831

Looks to me like our wild strawberry we call, " Snake Berry," Same folliage as the edible strawberry, but fruit is very small and covered with seeds, tastes strawberry-like but a little fiberry, not juicy and sweet as its descendent, the Strawberry-which-is-too expensive to buyat the market.
gcorrier
Lenoir City, TN

May 29, 2009
11:01 AM

Post #6612932

I agree on snake berry, Have em all over the place. They send out a runner that starts a new plant. Pull one and chase runners to five or six more. Flowers are insignificant and fruit here is rodent food, occasionally bird. You can leave em if you want but they will be everywhere in short order. Good for filling in where nothing else will grow!
greenbunny
Minneapolis, MN
(Zone 4a)

January 8, 2010
7:36 PM

Post #7442647

hmm... apologies, but this section of the yard became too overgrown with other things, and i never really found any flowers or berries on this. i'd like to leave this thread open til spring, so i can try to pay more attention to solving what this one is. perhaps i could take a sprig and replant it a pot, so when other stuff takes over, i could still monitor that one easily.

and i agree it looks like some sort of Geum, but not chiloense since we never got any such beautiful flower out of it!

see you in the spring!
Malus2006
Coon Rapids, MN
(Zone 4a)

January 8, 2010
7:49 PM

Post #7442708

Never noticed but here's another reason common name by itself is not good - snakeberry also refer to Solanum Dulcamara, Actaea rubra, Mitchella repens and at least one website refer to a unidentified tree species as snakeberry. I also bet that "snakeberry" refer to anything that have red poisonous fruits.
Mr_Canthus
Billingshurst
United Kingdom

January 8, 2010
9:17 PM

Post #7443010

What is the botanical name of the 'snake berry' that Jimmytomfarm introduced here?
Has to be Rosaceae anyway. Another one that looks a bit like that is Duchesnea indica
Malus2006
Coon Rapids, MN
(Zone 4a)

January 9, 2010
12:18 AM

Post #7443582

This is the only website I could found that name Potentilla indica (yes yet another name change) =-) http://www.sierrapotomac.org/W_Needham/IndianStrawberry_080617.htm

I looked up wild strawberry - a few species, none have common name snake berry. Same with Potentilla sterilis, Barren Strawberry (plantprofile try to use an awkward common name, strawberryleaf cinquefoil to fit it with the rest of potentilla family) which is commonly sold as ground cover.

I cant think of any more other than the huge cinquifoil family which would be hard to sort out unless someone else know of any more strawberry lookalikes.
Mr_Canthus
Billingshurst
United Kingdom

January 9, 2010
12:23 AM

Post #7443605

Just to say one of my favourites is Waldsteinia ternata... but I know it isn't that.
Its an excellent choice though if you want a really tight dense ground cover.
Are you saying Duchesnea is now another Potentilla?
Malus2006
Coon Rapids, MN
(Zone 4a)

January 9, 2010
2:39 AM

Post #7444074

Yes I found it on several websites - I don't know why they decided to lump it back in Potentilla or why it was separated from Potentilla in the first place. Wikipedia, PlantsProfile uses the name Potentilla.

Now I figured why PlantsProfile try to use the name strawberryleaf cinquefoil - we can't have two barren strawberry for two different genus.
Mr_Canthus
Billingshurst
United Kingdom

January 9, 2010
10:13 AM

Post #7444825

Oh Dear!... and in my RHS book it also lists Duchesnea as Fragaria indica... then there is the lovely little F. 'Pink Panda' which is a strawberry crossed with a potentilla and then back crossed with a strawberry... and of course there's still also Geum.
All good fun but no wonder normal people think we're mad.
Anyway, I don't think we'll get a positive specific ID on this photo alone
Malus2006
Coon Rapids, MN
(Zone 4a)

January 9, 2010
1:26 PM

Post #7444979

I agree - Geum, Potentilla, and Fragaria all looks very similiar in foliages.
Farmerdill
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)


January 9, 2010
2:07 PM

Post #7445091

Hard to tell from one picture. Snake berry in the southern USA refers to Duchesnea indica, which else where is listed as Indian Strawberry or mock strawberry. While the fruit and plant resemble the wild straw berry Fragaria virginiana it is easily identified because it has yellow bloom.

Resin

Resin
Northumberland
United Kingdom
(Zone 9a)

January 9, 2010
11:32 PM

Post #7446865

[quote="Mr_Canthus"]Are you saying Duchesnea is now another Potentilla?[/quote]

Yes; a genetic analysis found that Duchesnea was embedded in Potentilla. See: Eriksson, T. et al. 1998. Phylogenetic analysis of Potentilla using DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacers (ITS), and implications for the classification of Rosoideae (Rosaceae). Pl. Syst. Evol. 211: 155179.

Resin

Resin

Resin
Northumberland
United Kingdom
(Zone 9a)

January 9, 2010
11:54 PM

Post #7446939

Another more recent ref:
Eriksson, T., Hibbs, M.S., Yoder, A.D., Delwiche, C.F., & Donoghue, M.J. (2003). The Phylogeny of Rosoideae (Rosaceae) based on sequences of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear ribosomal DNA and the TRNL/F region of chloroplast DNA. Int. J. Plant Sci. 164 (2): 197211.

Resin
Mr_Canthus
Billingshurst
United Kingdom

January 10, 2010
12:10 AM

Post #7447012

Thanks Resin. Whats good enough for Erikson T. et al ( 1998 and 2003) is good enough for me.
I just find as time goes by, unlearning old things and superimposing new things gets more difficult.
I think I can cope with Duchesnea being a Potentilla though. But i shan't check out the references to find exactly why... lets just say its in their genes

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Plant Identification Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
SOLVED: Help with identification of this shrub dave 86 Nov 11, 2013 6:20 PM
SOLVED: Can Anyone Help Gayl 9 Jun 23, 2014 4:57 AM
SOLVED: help identify herb seeds????? dignbloom 6 Nov 4, 2010 8:08 PM
SOLVED: Mystery perennial dave 22 Nov 3, 2014 6:02 AM
SOLVED: Name my aloe??? tom1953 21 Jul 15, 2012 1:32 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America