Photo by Melody
It's time now to VOTE in our 14th annual photo contest! Voting ends November 7, so be sure to cast your votes for your favorites in each category here. Good luck to all contestants!

Article: English Ivy: Beauty or Beast?: mature and juvenile forms of ivy

Communities > Forums > Article: English Ivy: Beauty or Beast?
bookmark
Forum: Article: English Ivy: Beauty or Beast?Replies: 15, Views: 164
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

May 26, 2009
5:41 PM

Post #6600262

Enjoyed your article, Sharran.

Did you know that ivy has both a mature arboreal form and a juvenile form?. The mature arboreal form is the one with the berries. It climbs the 50 ft trees along my driveway and hangs in long tendrils over the trees that are no longer identifiable.
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

May 26, 2009
6:02 PM

Post #6600371

Hi Gloria,

When I was researching for accuracy when I wrote the article some time ago, I found references to that same arboreal form. I didn't write about it because I have no experience with it, and thought it would be a great companion piece for another time. It scares me to write of things I know nothing about. I don't feel very comfortable with it.

I would love to see it growing in real life, though, and sounds as if it can truly take over a world of trees and every thing else in its path. I should have made the distinction in my article, so I am glad you pointed it out. I can still add a link to it, and now I plan to do that if I can find one that would be appropriate. Let me know if you have a specific link in mind, otherwise it will be later this evening before I can get to it.

I have been away, and the rains have created a jungle of my yard, including my ivy! I need a machete.

Thanks for this extra bit of information. I do appreciate it.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

May 26, 2009
8:44 PM

Post #6600984

Woops. I meant to post the link and apparently forgot to do it.

Here is a link to a photo of the black berries. The leaf form is different on the arboreal form and if you take cuttings the leaf form stays true in the new plant. I always thought it would make a great hanging basket.

http://blog.metmuseum.org/cloistersgardens/2008/12/18/the-holly-and-the-ivy/holly-and-ivy-in-fruit/

gloria125
Greensboro, AL

June 7, 2011
5:30 AM

Post #8614887

This summer the trees along my driveway are covered with arboreal English Ivy. They stand guarding the entrance to my property like ancient bearded trolls! What kind of trees they may be, I may never know. What I can see is only 150 ft statues of English Ivy!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2011
8:11 AM

Post #8615245

Now that is an amazing picture you just painted with your words, Gloria. You should get out there with your camera!

My daylilies just started their parade of color and in the garden at the top of my back yard, I suddenly looked close enough to see that they are covered in bindweed. You know what I'll be doing the rest of the day.

I swear that vine just popped up over night.
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

June 7, 2011
3:02 PM

Post #8616052

If you are out there in the day, it must not be as hot in Ky as it is here. Its over 100 oF
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2011
5:28 PM

Post #8616336

It was 95, but I got out early enough that I just warmed up with the day and managed to get a lot done.

I think I'll survive.
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

June 7, 2011
9:35 PM

Post #8616922

What I have learned from experience is that the arboreal form which produces berries provides the birds with ways to spread this ivy all over creation. The way to keep things under some degree of control is to cut all the tendrils when you see them climbing a tree. One tree that I did not do this for will be tended to by an arborist in a few days. They will have to use the chain saw to cut through these lower parts. English Ivy is not held in high regard by local environmentalists - and I stand guilty of having deliberately introduced here on my rural acres!!! Argggghhhh!
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2011
10:53 PM

Post #8617000

I absolutely know the feeling!!
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

June 8, 2011
6:21 AM

Post #8617386

I inherited my arboreal ivy trolls from a former owner. I agree with wannadanc. Trolls should die!

I don't have pictures of my guardian troll trees, but they do look similar to trolls --150 ft tall.


And here's a picture of trolls:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:John_Bauer_1915.jpg

This message was edited Jun 8, 2011 9:59 AM
Sharran
Calvert City, KY
(Zone 7a)

June 8, 2011
5:04 PM

Post #8618758

Oh my gosh, Gloria...they are so so so ugggggllllllyyyyyy

Surely yours don't look quite that...ummmm...troll-like?
gloria125
Greensboro, AL

June 8, 2011
6:30 PM

Post #8618930

100 ft tendrils of English Ivy. Really, beauty? only a mother could love.
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

June 8, 2011
6:40 PM

Post #8618955

Gloria - purveyor of grins!!!!!!!!!! Thank you!!!!!
diggerdane
Fennville, MI

January 28, 2013
4:49 AM

Post #9399803

Mature ivy is like a different sort of plant.. tt's very shrubby, compact, no long tendrils. While it does flower (not showy, but the bees love it), in many zones it never fruits or becomes invasive by seeds. This mature ivy has a different leaf shape, makes a great tough shrub for dry shade..can be propagated by cuttings (not easy like juvenile form)... does not revert to the juvenile form.

Mature ivy usually develops only on old plants, that have climbed up a wall or tree. Cutting can be taken from the section that has changed to the adult form.

Do not fear ivy growing up trees. if you don't like it, just cut through each stem where it starts to go up the trunk.
SwampFlower
Jasper, FL

January 28, 2013
7:48 AM

Post #9399995

I planted English ivy three years ago. I thought they would grow like crazy.
I'd have beautiful green walls and the trolls would somehow transform into fairies beneath the green lush yet, they just sat there.
The six inch vines I planted, remained six inch vines.
Then they spoke to me. Lots of plants can do that. They said, with a yawn, "don't worry. The first year we sleep, the second year we creep and the third year we leap."
I have some amazing English ivy ground covers creeping, getting ready to leap up the walls. Just like they promised three years ago, this being the third year. I can't wait 'till spring, to see them spring over the garden fences ... I might have to move Saint Francis out of the way though.
SwampFlower
Jasper, FL

January 28, 2013
7:50 AM

Post #9399997

I love your articles by the way Sharran. I've almost read all of your Aunt Bett stories. Thank you for being such a wonderful writer and wonderful person!

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Article: English Ivy: Beauty or Beast? Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Ya did it again! A delightful article! Elena 53 May 28, 2009 11:20 PM
A Treasure postmandug 7 May 26, 2009 7:16 PM
other ivies jrainger 2 Jun 2, 2009 5:19 AM
Great article dbelcher 1 Jun 13, 2011 9:28 AM
Caution the_naturalist 1 Jun 14, 2011 4:25 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America