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Water Gardens: lily pad with red foliage

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FrillyLily
springfield area, MO
(Zone 5b)

May 29, 2009
1:09 PM

Post #6613256

does anyone have hardy water lilies that have a reddish foliage? I would be interested in finding out more about them.
If anyone has some for trade, I could send bearded iris, Daylilies or sedums.
I would like to see pictures of red if anyone has them
thanks
snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 29, 2009
1:18 PM

Post #6613290

Not a hardy lily, but there are some gorgeous tropicals. 'Leopardess' is green heavily streaked and splotched with a deep maroon red.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/50767/
FrillyLily
springfield area, MO
(Zone 5b)

May 29, 2009
3:00 PM

Post #6613680

I do want a hardy one, I wouldn't pay money for something that wouldn't come back next year. I'm a tightwad lol
snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 29, 2009
3:20 PM

Post #6613788

That's OK. It does smart when I pitch them in the compost pile. This winter I'm going to try to over winter one. How, I dont know.
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 30, 2009
12:10 AM

Post #6615695

Don't know whether this will help but our waterlilies stay totally submerged during the wet season when water levels are high. You only see small clusters of leaves about 10 - 15 cms high protruding from the soil. At the end of the wet season when water levels start to consistently drop the waterlilies put on a burst of growth sending leaves up to the water surface and start to flower. I assume this is the tropical waterlily's adaptation to prevent damage from torrential rains, and flooding water currents. So to "overwinter" tropicals you might need to put them into deep water. Follow nature's way perhaps.
snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 30, 2009
1:08 AM

Post #6615851

That has to be right tropicbreeze. Also deep water would be a few degrees warmer. I don't know noonamah AU ( love the name) but here it gets ugly cold in winter.
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 30, 2009
2:02 AM

Post #6616011

The wet season (monsoon) is our high sun (summer) period, but there's more overcast days. Dry season (winter) is mostly cloudless and that's when the waterlilies flower (until/unless the water dries up). So winter day temps average around 32 - 33C, and nightly minimums average around 17C.
snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 30, 2009
2:40 AM

Post #6616210

Last winter we had a low of -27 C. Yes, -27. Noonama looks pretty good weather wise. ;>)
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 30, 2009
5:59 AM

Post #6616808

That's too hard for me to even imagine. Last year we had a 'freeze' where it got down to 10C and it made the headlines of the newspaper. Luckily it doesn't happen every year.
snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 30, 2009
2:46 PM

Post #6617655

Count your blessings! My DH and I are selling our business and retiring within the next two months. After the dust settles we have two trips on our agenda - Machu Picchu and Australia. Not in the same year, we're not youngsters anymore. LOL We are very much looking forward to see the "down under". No specific itinerary has been chosen yet, hint, hint!
TXdoodlebug
San Antonio, TX

May 30, 2009
2:51 PM

Post #6617673

Woohoo, I'm watching this thread - I, too want to see Australia so I'm waiting to see your itinerary.
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 30, 2009
11:28 PM

Post #6619286

One thing I'll have to say, it takes more than a life time to see all of Australia, but I'm trying real hard. Climatically we have just about everything, except permanent snow. But in winter we have a snow area in the mountains larger than Switzerland. Right around the southern coast it's a mediterranean climate. The northwest coast is wet/dry tropics, the northeast coast is wet tropics. A third of the country is between the Tropic of Capricorn and the equator. The desert areas range from mediterranean to monsoonal tropical. And for size of country, it's about the same as mainland USA. But any thing specific you want to know about just ask. I've travelled a large part of the country myself and can find out about other parts.
snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 31, 2009
12:24 AM

Post #6619491

I know I want to see Adelaide , the Wollemi Pine in it's natural habitat if possible, the Sydney Opera House, Alice Springs, the Great Barrier Reef, Kings Canyon and the Daintree Forest and something called the Red Domes. I'm sure there's more but we havn't done any real definite research. We're planning on 3 weeks to a month, during our winter your spring. Given the amount of time we've alloted is all that doable and what must I be leaving out? I feel fortunate to be able learn from you.
jlj072174
Raleigh, NC
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2009
12:56 AM

Post #6619613

Snapple -- I was looking that those very lilies today at the nursery I returned my lotus to, and the guy there said that they weren't hardy for my zone (7B), but there are heaters you can buy to try and keep them warm through the winter, then they might make it if left in the outdoor pond.
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 31, 2009
1:40 AM

Post #6619831

Adelaide is the "City of Churches" surrounded by vineyards and wineries. The Sydney Opera House is easy. Alice Springs is a desert town with the Desert Wildlife Park - lots of desert flowers and wildlife. A lot of attractions in the outlying areas but you need to travel a bit to see them all. Kings Canyon, (and Uluru-Kata Tjuta NP) are visited from Alice Springs but a fair way out. The Great Barrier Reef is about 2,000 kms long running down the east coast. Most commonly visited from Cairns or the Whitsundays (Airley), but there's plenty of other points of access as well. The Daintree Rainforest is just north of Cairns and is only part of the World Heritage Wet Tropics region there. By "Red Domes" I think you might mean The Bungle Bungles (Purnululu NP) between the Kimberley and the Great Sandy Desert in the north of Western Australia.

You could do that in a month by mostly flying between points, having a look, moving on, having a look, moving on, etc. You'd have to be moving fairly fast and not looking too much. So it all depends on what sort of things you particularly want to see. If you do it in our spring then the south west of Western Australia (down the Perth end) is absolutely spectacular for wildflowers. At the same time the Sydney region (Hawkesbury sandstone) is also great for wild flowers.

You might need to concentrate on a smaller area, have a more relaxed time, and have a better look.
snapple45
Holland, OH
(Zone 5b)

May 31, 2009
3:19 AM

Post #6620272

That's priceless advice. We'll pick fewer places to see for a more sane pace. As a plant junkie the more wild flowers the better. I printed this thread out and have it stuck in the Foders for Australia. I'm so grateful. Is it really "Put another shrimp on the barbie". We're coming!
FrillyLily
springfield area, MO
(Zone 5b)

June 2, 2009
9:41 PM

Post #6632599

Does anyone have any of these for trade?

Dallas -this one has purplish leaves and is supposed to be a hardy one.

Mary -pink bloom
Lemon Mist

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