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Australian and New Zealand Gardening: My Bromeliads

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Kaelkitty
Adelaide
Australia
(Zone 10a)

June 8, 2009
12:58 PM

Post #6657891

Lovely as most Broms are I just can't be doing with a new obsession, it's TOO MUCH. However, a few have snuck sideways into my succulent collection over the years. I want to concentrate on the more succulent types - Puyas Dyckias etc. but I also have a few old favourites that I just can't bear to get rid of. In some cases I know I have the correct name, in others I have a name but I am not sure it's correct and for some I have no names at all. Now that I have completely caught up on the forum (YAAAYEEE!) and I can follow the progress of ongoing threads as they happen, I thought I would pick the collective brains of the Brom fans here and get my ID's checked and corrected if possible.

This is #1 Bilbergia nutans (The one name I am absolutely sure of! LOL!) The plant may be common, but I am pretty happy with this photo of it flowering.

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Kaelkitty
Adelaide
Australia
(Zone 10a)

June 8, 2009
1:03 PM

Post #6657902

#2 I have been told is Billbergia pyramidalis but it got a bit crook over the summer (47C in the shade was NOT appreciated) The core of the rosette started to die from the inside out, but the plant has recently sent up a nice pup and it looks like the new rosette will be OK. I guess I will have to accept this ID until the plant grows enough to flower out and confirm it (edited for spelling)

This message was edited Jun 8, 2009 10:33 PM

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Kaelkitty
Adelaide
Australia
(Zone 10a)

June 8, 2009
1:07 PM

Post #6657910

#3 I think is Billbergia pyramidalis 'Stricta' but the flower seems VERY different from the photos I have seen of the regular B. pyramidalis. Comments Anyone?

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Kaelkitty
Adelaide
Australia
(Zone 10a)

June 8, 2009
1:17 PM

Post #6657953

#4 is obviously a Neoregelia, it has the standard mid-lavender coloured flowers - I think it is Neoregelia 'Rose Blush' but I would dearly love to be able to confirm it as the plant has flowered twice and is now a clump of 6 large pups around a decaying "mother" and I'd like to be able to pass it on to others under it's correct name - I certainly don't want to keep all 6 of them!

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Kaelkitty
Adelaide
Australia
(Zone 10a)

June 8, 2009
1:21 PM

Post #6657964

#5 is a more recent acquisition, purchased without a name - I think it is most likely a Puya or a Dyckia, but again I am open to suggestions.

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Kaelkitty
Adelaide
Australia
(Zone 10a)

June 8, 2009
1:27 PM

Post #6657983

#6 is the last one I currently have, and it is a real weirdy - I have been all over the web and my reference books and I tentatively think it MAY just be an Orthophytum, but as before I am definitely open for suggestions on this one. This is the first time I have EVER seen one of these succulent broms with spineless leaf edges and I just don't know what to make of it.

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Kaelkitty
Adelaide
Australia
(Zone 10a)

June 8, 2009
1:31 PM

Post #6657998

Finally, there are four species I used to own that I no longer have and would like to replace

Neoregelia spectabilis (Not any of the cultivars - I am looking for the original "wild" species type)

Dyckia brevifolia

Dyckia sulphurea and

Puya mirabilis var. tucumana.

Any help or information would be greatly appreciated,

TTFN, KK.
Budgieman
Sydney
Australia

June 9, 2009
9:35 AM

Post #6662379

Hi KK,
Took this pic over the weekend to ask what it was.
Think you may have answered it!
Let me know.
Cheers
Budgie

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weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

June 9, 2009
12:53 PM

Post #6662814

Hi KK, I'm not much help I'm afraid, other than to say I think #6 is in the Tillandsia genus. I guess it hasn't flowered?
I don't go much on the dykias and Puyas, mostly because my climate is too humid for them. Even my succulents struggle in the summer up here.
Looks like the start of a collection...he he.
Kaelkitty
Adelaide
Australia
(Zone 10a)

June 9, 2009
9:11 PM

Post #6664937

Yay to Budgie,
Yes you have it correct. Apparently there are several different taxa in cultivation ( http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/adv_search.php?searcher[common]=&searcher[family]=&searcher[genus]=Billbergia&searcher[species]=nutans&searcher[cultivar]=&searcher[hybridizer]=&searcher[grex]=&search_prefs[blank_cultivar]=&search_prefs[sort_by]=genus&images_prefs=both&Search=Search ) but I have only ever seen the basic one. It is one seriously hardy plant - I have two clumps of this, one really big old one, which I am probably going to have to divide soon YUK (it can really cut your hands up). My plants are no fuss and flower happily every year - I like them. The only drawbacks are the very sharp leaf edges and the fact that they (like many garden broms) can be serious snail havens, so you need to watch where you site them.

to WW,
I have only had #6 a couple of weeks, so it looks pretty much as it did when I purchased it (for $4 at the local Cottage Garden Society meeting, labelled "bromeliad" LOL!) I hadn't thought of Tillandsia though - I'll check them out, I forgot that they CAN be terrestrial - pretty much all I ever see here are those ghastly "novelty" plants where they hot glue the poor little things to bits of corkboard with tacky accessories. You mentioning Tillandsia reminded me that I used to have one and I should add that to my Bromeliad want list. It was quite tiny (about 6 or 7 cm across) with a fat little bulbous bottom and many very fine grey, almost hairlike, leaves. (Possibly T. argentea?) It "grew" happily on a back window sill for me through many years but unfortunately did not make any pups when it eventually flowered so I lost it - grrr! What is a "good" way to mount the smaller Tillandsias, so that they at least look natural? Also, how can you encourage them to propagate, so that if I can replace it, I won't lose it the next time.

What I am hoping to achieve by putting this thread up here is to get not only the advice of the Bromeliad fans on the Australian forum, but also to put these pictures up in a public place where you can direct other people you know who are not necessarily members of DG to have a look at them.

TTFN, KK.

PS a tip for WW - if summer humidity is a problem, look for spring/summer growing succulents and cacti - I prefer the winter growers myself because it rains here in the winter and they tolerate wet feet better when they are actively growing. Also, all succulents will tolerate humidity better if they are well ventilated - open breezy shelters are the way to go, after all - the only essential thing is to keep excess rain away from the plants. I'll have to have a bit of a think about types to reccomend, but remind me later and I will get a list up for you to look at.
Budgieman
Sydney
Australia

June 11, 2009
9:11 AM

Post #6672164

Thanks KK. I'm guessing that mine is an original like everything else on the block.
It is crammed into an old washing tub with a climber coming out of the centre, It's going
to be one big job to remove and pot. Wish me luck!
Will send pics of the others I have as time permits.
Budgie

Gabi65
Newcastle(NSW)
Australia
(Zone 10a)

September 4, 2012
8:07 PM

Post #9265206

I have seen two sizes of the Billbergia variety. I love them as they are so good for that awkward garden by the path alongside the house. Shade all day except for blazing midday sun and they don't mind a bit. There are ones about the diameter of a pencil or a little larger and another one that is 3 times that diameter. Both have flower stems anywhere from 6" to 12" long. Underneath I plant low growing white and pink Impatiens and in between the "bellbird" clumps are lovely white windflower plants with waist high flowers, also a no fuss plant. Plug any chinks with Club Moss and voila!

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

September 4, 2012
8:25 PM

Post #9265264

Hi Gabi65 I think you missed the date on this thread ...it's way old ^_^

here is the link to the current thread for you.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1277963/

have fun
chrissy

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