Photo by Melody

Viewing all entries from Invasive Species Contest 2011: Invasive or Non-Native Plants

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By pirl
Houttuynia Cordata 'Chameleon' - beautifully colored leaves but highly aggressive bordering on invasive here in zone 7.


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By pirl
Aegopodium (green and white leaves shown here on the right) will survive Round Up without a problem. It took many repeated applications to kill it, here in zone 7, but I won the war as you can see by the photo on the left in this collage.


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By DMersh
Heracleum mantegazzianum, Giant Hogweed. Photographed SE England.
Invasive in non arid temperate/subtropical areas of Europe/North America, very cold hardy to around -40C. Sap causes severe blistering and burning of skin, it does best in damp places like riverbanks.


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By Metrosideros
Melastoma candidum is an aggressive invasive species on windward Hawai'i Island. It establishes itself in native vegetation and displaces it.


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By plantladylin
Schinus terebinthifolius - "Brazilian Pepper", Zone 9a Florida

Native to Argentina, Paraguay & Brazil. Introduced into Fla @ mid 1800's as an ornamental, now widespread throughout the state and one of the most agressive non-native invasive plants in Fla.


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By plantladylin
Dioscorea bulbifera - "Air Potato", Zone 9a Florida

Native to tropical Asia, this fast growing herbaceous vine was introduced to Florida @ 1905 and is considered a noxious weed. It spreads by forming aerial tubers/bubils as well as large underground tubers.


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By drthor
Toadflax Snapdragon ... will grow and re-seed every where


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By drthor
Foxglove in between my roses. Foxglove will spread seeds all over my yard. But it is a beautiful plant ... so I don't mind it.


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By bordersandjacks
During the 1700ís, Chinese tallow was introduced to the United States as an ornamental tree. Chinese tallow can invade a variety of habitats ranging from swampy to saline waters, and from full sun to shade situations. This is the back of our pond- it's beautiful in the fall.


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By kwanjin
Arundo Donax. I planted this on purpose. Silly me.


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By Baja_Costero
Carpobrotus edulis flower in early March, coastal NW Baja California, Zone 11.


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By Baja_Costero
Carpobrotus flower in early March, coastal NW Baja California.


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By momoftwo607
Ditch lilies are all over here in upstate NY/zone 5a


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By momoftwo607
Common toadflax. Upstate NY/zone 5a


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By Inthegarden
This is the Orlaya Grandiflora that have self-sown in between my patio stones and on my lawn in zone 9a. According to Annie's Annuals, it is a
"rare and endangered wildflower from Germany". The white blooms are lovely and the foliage is attractive but it is too much of a good thing.


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By LadyAshleyR
Coltsfoot, introduced from Europe.


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By LadyAshleyR
Bird's-eye Speedwell, origin: Europe


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By jeri11
cayratia japonica


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By laurahteague
Autumn olive in full bloom...bees and butterflies love it, but it's listed as a severe threat by the Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council.


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By laurahteague
Queen Anne's Lace is gorgeous! I love it, but unfortunately, it's listed as a significant threat by the Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council.


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By wilting_in_sac
Tetrapanax has reached 15+ feet in height and sends out runners that rise up to 20 feet away, often with any disturbance of the soil. Dozens of new chutes need to be removed and the main plant now has a 10" thick tree like trunk. Frost kills the leaves but it regrows aggressively


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By shihtzumom
Pond plants in Virginia. They quickly filled the pond and had to be removed. Lovely but invasive.


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By shihtzumom
Morning Glory in Virginia. So lovely yet they took over my flower bed the next year. It took forever to clear the bed of these massive vines.


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By henryr10
Nandina domestica AKA Heavenly Bamboo Zone 6 OH


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By henryr10
Iris pseudacorus Zone 6 OH


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By Sneirish
Labelled "Yellow Scabiosa" from a mail-order nursery in 2008. It is pretty but very invasive! Overgrows other plants. Grows rapidly with a long tap root & sends out underground runners in every direction. Plus the seed dispersed & started more volunteers. I was still pulling babies in the fall 2010.


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By sallyg
Common mullein (Verbascum thapsis) showing off its uncommonly furry leaves on a misty morning


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By Bob_71
Buddleia is included on many invasive plant lists. It blooms in panacles up to 18" long made up of hundreds of tiny blooms, each of which is capable of generating seed. This is a crab spider lying in ambush in "Black Knight" buddleia.


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By Bob_71
Buddleia, our familiar "Butterfly Bush" is considered an invasive, non-native species. Originally from China, Korea and Japan, it has become highly popular here. It produces mountains of seeds and sets seeds readily! This one is Buddleia davidii "Miss Ruby" and is furnishing nectar to the Monarch


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By carpathiangirl
Lonicera maackii, Ohio, zone 5a. Bush honeysuckles leaf out before many native species and are suspected to produce allelopathic chemicals that enter the soil and inhibit the growth of other plants, preventing native plants from competing with the shrub. One of the Ohio top 10 invasive plants


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By Buttoneer
Stinging Nettle Zone 6.


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By Buttoneer
Mile-a-minute weed zone 6.


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By alexbr
My suculent blooming Crassula falcata visited by a green and yellow lady bug.
It's origin is South Africa, from the Cape of Good Hope.
Common names: Propeller Plant, Scarlet Paintbrush, Airplane Plant.
Some information here at Dave's Garden PlantFiles "Crassula".


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By alexbr
Another view of my suculent blooming Crassula falcata visited by a green and yellow lady bug (Did you find it?).
It's origin is South Africa, from the Cape of Good Hope.
Common names: Propeller Plant, Scarlet Paintbrush, Airplane Plant.


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By carpathiangirl
Iris pseudacorus, Ohio, zone 5a. This is the only iris on noxious weed lists in the US, very pretty but very agressive as it spreads rapidly, out-competes our own native species, and is difficult to eradicate.


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By grammaj
Aegopodium podgraria also known as goutweed, Bishop's-weed or snow-on-the-mountain. The variegated variety is slightly less invasive and planted under the maple in the poor soil it doesn't spread as much and the mower keeps in in check. I'm in zone 5.


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By grammaj
My neighbor's Aegopodium podgraria, it has taken over the entire side of her house, went under the porch and into her plantings in the front. This is a horrible weed. In zone 5


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By lambdakennels1
The multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora) was introduced to the United States in the 1860s as an erosion control. It carries rose rosette disease and also crowds out native species. It is found on the Pacific coast and on the Eastern coast west to Texas. This one is in Hunt County, Texas, in zone 7b.


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By jpb111
Giant Hogweed growing in Rensselaer county, NY. A nasty plant which has sap that will render your skin succeptible to bad sunburn, and could last for life. Very dangerous and invasive. Usually spread through bird droppings near water. Brought to America as a unique horticultural specimen.


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By ginger749
Dogwood from QLD.


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By PamelaMesserall


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By PamelaMesserall
I've been told this is a invasive tree, called foxv


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By ginger749
This is a Queensland Bottle Tree. Brachychiton rupestris
It is at least 99 years old.
Picture was taken at Roma, Queensland, Australia.


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By wildforager
This is a picture of Autumn Olive (Elaeagnus umbellata). I took this picture in the fall of 2010 when I was harvesting the berries to make jam. In this shot you can clearly see the leaf and the berries. The berries are very distinct with their red color and white speckles.


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By wildforager
Here is a picture of Watercress (Nasturtium officinale). Watercress is considered invasive because it can clog up water ways, this picture is close to proving that.


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By sbinlex
Vicia cracca or cow vetch growing along up and up a chainlink fence at Masterson Station park in Lexington, Kentucky. When I first saw this plant in May of last year I thought it might have been a beautiful native wild flower, too bad it's another invader from Europe / Asia!


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By Kelli
Long-beaked filaree, Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, California (zone 9)


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By Kelli
I love this field, even if it is full of invasive harding grass. The wind in the dry grass makes a soothing sound. Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area, CA (zone 9)


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By skayc1
I do not know the name of this tree, in this photo are a large number of seeds it grows that the birds do not eat. around the tree are tons of seedling plants that these seeds produce.


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By 2Bleu_zone8
The beautiful Legustrum Privet. Planted last Autumn in zone 7, western SC. Simply remove the flowers before they bloom and dispose of in the trash (not the compost) and this will keep the seeds from spreading. They are spread through birds and the wind.


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By bluephosi
Closeup of a Hobo Spider
view slideshow at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=34D8o9Ns3R4


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By naturegal1000
Castor bean plant... Ricinus communis.... The bean or seed contains a toxin, ricin, it is highly poisonous. This photo was taken in the northern part of San Diego County, the City of Vista. It is widespread as it easily seeds and is fast growing. The seed washes throughout tributaries towards the Pacific Ocean. It can reach a tree like height of approximately 30 feet. Though it can be quite attractive it has the ability to choke out native plants rapidly if left unattended by the authorities.


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By jodygirl
Phragmites australis (common reed) and Phalaris arundinacea (reed canary grass).


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By JoParrott
Grown in zone 7. The only name I have for this is Red Pagoda. I had it growing in Florida, at the edge of the woods behind our home. I was told that it was very invasive, but I just thought it was beautiful!


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By diane11
My neighbor loves the ivy in her yard. I would too, if it stayed there. We are in the 9b zone, so no cold winter to slow it down.


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By xenya
Vinca vine, or periwinkle, completely covering the forest floor. This was taken in Maryland, zone 7. It spread from a house on the other side of the forest.


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By MarilynneS
This Hibiscus plant was purchased in March of 2009 .. in late June of 2009, I put it OUTSIDE in my garden .. I am in Zone 3A .. it thrived !!


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By MarilynneS
I am in Zone 3A. This is SPHINX MOTH who was definitely 'off track' sitting on a Sunflower in my garden in Northwestern Ontario !


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By imhswmn
I Planted these purple liatris thinking what a pretty plant. Little did i know that for every seed that hits the ground a little bulb forms and a new plant grows creating new plants. wow. talk about high maintinance.


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By cwkw7
This huge stainless steel tree in St. Louis will not be invading anytime soon. : ]


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By 217happy1
Big Brother admiring Nana's Flowers.


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By 217happy1
Little Brother trying to pick Nana's flowers.


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By standish816
Butter-and-eggs Toadflax - Linaria vulgaris
Photo taken on a private ranch in the Colorado Rocky Mountains (zone 4) at elevation 9,500 feet.


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By ApopkaJohn
Ardisia crenata - Coral Ardisia, Christmas Berry shows berries Nov-Feb during the normally drab winters. Invades woods and marshes in central Florida. Also seedlings are commercially grown as small foliage plants added to dish gardens.


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By nstaafl
Invasive Exotic Caesar Weed (Urena lobata) in Key West, FL


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By nstaafl
Native Ibis sitting on invasive exotic Schefflera (Brassaia actinophylla) tree in Key West, FL


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By sallyg
Invasive species- the path is set but where will it lead? Local flora being overrun with last year's growth of honeysuckle and tearthumb


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By seacanepain
This is Arundo Donax : Seacane, Wild Cane, Elephant Grass.
This plant has long been a problem in California and is now becoming a problem in the south east as we have found fighting to eliminate it.


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By DMersh
Carpobrotus acinaciformis, Hottentot fig, Iceplant. Invasive in coastal areas of Europe/USA that don't have heavy frosts but rarely found far inland. Carpets large areas and chokes off other vegetation, native to South Africa. Cannot survive being snow covered.


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By DaylilySLP
Myriophyllum brasiliensis 'Red Stem'. Growing on our Pond.


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By DaylilySLP
Euphorbia myrsinites. Got rid of this after finding out about the allergic reaction you get from the sap. We were very careful when removing it, but I still came down with a lingering rash.


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By frmdeath2life
Euphorbia cyparissias - Mod Invasive Central Pa Z.6


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By firsttwelve
Circium vulgare, Bull Thistle. Native to Europe, Asia and Africa, this thistle can be found in disturbed sites in all 50 states in the US. Though the flowers are relished by bees and the seeds are a favorite of many birds, we have native thistles that provide more beneficial nectar and seed.


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By firsttwelve
Oriental Bittersweet, Celastrus orbiculatus. This climbing vine produces red and orange fruit that is used in crafts and spread by wildlife. Twining on and amongst trees and shrubs, it crowds, shades, steals nutrients and water from our native vegetation. Photo taken in NW Ohio.


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By blueaussi
Creeping Speedwell and Common Dandelions (complete with honeybee) compete with the native Carolina Geranium in my backyard. I know I should mow them before they go to seed; but they have been so beautiful, and the bees and early butterflies love them.


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By JulesGarden4B
While many are familiar with easy-to-maintain Sparaxis Tricolor Bulbs, this special variety's apparently a hybrid picotee effect on flower. Passed on thru a grandmother, this beauty thrives in zone 9 & 10 of SoCal 15 miles N of Temecula wine country. Prolific & expands well-worth a spot in garden!


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By trilian15
"Green Tsunami": Galega orientalis. Protected grove near conservation area Natura at Viikki. Helsinki, Finland, 2010. I predict it to be a big problem in sarmatic mixed/boreal forests area. It is used to purify oil contaminated soil. Where Galega orientalis takes over, there will be no other plants.


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By chefmike92
tree that is a sucker that is comming up from the mother tree more then 100 ft from the mother


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By chefmike92
same plant (tree) sucker tree that is comming up from the mother 100 ft away


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By blueaussi
Creeping speedwell mixed with some sort of rye grass. I saw the ladybug and quick took its picture, but i didn't see the larva until I uploaded the pictures to the computer.


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By revlyon
My lily bloomed 2 weeks ago at the end of February. I bring them in for the winter. The photo was taken looking with the lily against the window. As you can see there is snow on the ground in the background. I live in Galway, NY which is in Saratoga Co. Hardiness zone 5.


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By revlyon
African blue lily blooming in February.
Agapanthus africanus
usual flowering period: July to September
Galway NY Hardiness zone 5


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By Aqua0174
Plant; Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)
Zone: 6
Location: Juniata River, Central Pennsylvania
Description: I believe this plant is a prime example of how beauty can be deceptive.This photo shows how loosestrife's dense and impenetrable stands are destructive and difficult to control.


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By r72579
Duckweed. Taken at Avery Island, Louisiana, zone 9.


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By r72579
Duckweed. Taken at Avery Island, Louisiana. Zone 9.


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By adinamiti
Sonchus arvensis (sow thistle) on a field in Balotesti, Romania, around my house. It is a very noxious weed, although has the same properties as dandelion.


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By adinamiti
Sinapis alba, better known as mustard , growing wild on the field around my house in Balotesti, Romania.


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By Wahlnuts1
Common Mullein/ Wooly Mullein. Photo taken summer, 2010, Minnetonka, MN. I had seen these elsewhere on my mother's property and convinced her that we should watch it grow! I did not know it was invasive at the time but had my suspicions. This summer the garden will be Wooly Mullein free!


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By Resin
Dense regeneration of Abies procera, Picea sitchensis, and Tsuga heterophylla. All these are from the Pacific Northwest of North America, and invasive here in northeastern England.


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By Resin
Dense invasive seedlings of Western Hemlock Tsuga heterophylla excluding all other plants. Northeast England; species native to western North America.


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By poisondartfrog
Purple Loosestrife

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