Photo by Melody

Dave's Garden Articles: By Geoff Stein

Thursday, July 24, 2008

Gardening picture

Introduction to spotted aloes
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

This article is partly to help the reader clear up some of the confusion that is common with identifying and growing spotted aloes.... but as most readers of these articles couldn't really care less about which spotted aloe is which, I have to admit writing this article is mostly a mentally cathartic process to help me clear my own mind up, as much as possible, concerning this quagmire of spotted aloe idenfication.

Continue reading »

Saturday, July 19, 2008

Gardening picture

Trachycarpus- the Windmill Palms
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Trachycarpus are relatively cold hardy and very ornamental fan palms commonly used in landscaping and gardens all over the world. New species are becoming available all the time and most are easy to grow. The following article is an introduction and discussion of most of these palms.

Continue reading »

Sunday, July 13, 2008

Gardening picture

Mars must have palms and Venus is a flower garden
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Why do men like some plants and women others? Why are some plant societies nearly all men, and others predominately women (same reason, I am guessing)?

Continue reading »

Sunday, July 6, 2008

Gardening picture

Introduction to Aloes
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Aloes are one of the best succulent plants for both landscape use and growing in pots. This article will serve as an introduction to a variety of Aloe types, as well as an introduction to aloe parts, so subsequent articles might be more easily understood.

Continue reading »

Monday, June 30, 2008

Gardening picture

Bob, Master Gardener Trials and Errors
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Bob cartoons, continued...

Continue reading »

Monday, June 23, 2008

Gardening picture

Introduction to the Medusoid Euphorbias
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Ever since I have been interested in plants the weird things called Medusoid Euphorbias have fascinated me. The following brief article is an introduction to this wonderfully ornamental category of caudiciform succulents.

Continue reading »

Monday, June 16, 2008

Gardening picture

Oxalis- the most evil weed of succulent and cactus cultivation
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

There are many species of Oxalis and some are even ones I have acquired on purpose- those are ones I don't consider 'weeds' and of course they are also the ones that die on me. But Oxalis stricta, aka Common Yellow Woodsorrel, Lemon Clover, Yellow Oxalis etc., is difficult to kill and nearly impossible to eradicate. It shows up anywhere and everywhere as if by spontaneous generation. It is one of the most annoying and difficult weeds to control in a cactus and succulent collection (and probably any plant collection for that matter). The article offers few solutions, but at least discusses some of ones options including personal experiences and failures.

Continue reading »

Sunday, June 8, 2008

Gardening picture

Cheap and Easy Succulents: Personal Recommendations
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Ever visit a nursery and be amazed and tempted by the cool and weird looking succulents being offered for sale, for just a few dollars... but didn't know which ones were easy, and which were gonna die for sure? I have many times. This article is a brief guide to some of the easy and not-so-easy succulents commonly encountered at the average nursery that will carry such plants.

Continue reading »

Sunday, May 18, 2008

Gardening picture

Introduction to the Araucaceae- wonderful conifers from down under
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

The members of the Araucaceae are beautiful and majestic trees and many just happen to grow well where I live in California. The following is an introduction to some of the more common species and a little cultivational information.

Continue reading »

Monday, May 5, 2008

Gardening picture

Palm Hardiness- the OTHER factors aside from Cold Hardiness
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

When palms are described in terms of their hardiness, almost always it is reference to their cold hardiness. This is how a palm gets a USDA number of let's say 8a, 9b or 11 etc. However there are severe limitations to this hardiness designation that pertain to the cultivation of palms (this is probably the case with many other plant species as well, but I am most familiar with palms). These other forms of hardiness can be completely overlooked if one is reading texts and referring simply to a palm's USDA hardiness rating. And serious miscalculations concerning the likelihood of a certain species ability to survive one's marginal climate can lead to disappointment and loss of potentially costly plants. The following article is a discussion of some of these other important hardiness parameters.

Continue reading »

Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Gardening picture

More wisdom from Bob, Master Gardener
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

The following are some more fascinating situations and clever solutions that make up the life a true master gardener like Bob.

Continue reading »

Sunday, April 27, 2008

Gardening picture

Pot Ideas for Succulent plants
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Tired of the same old assortment of pots for your burgeoning collection of succulent plants? We were. Good choices for potting succulents are rarely available and at many standard nurseries or garden centers. The following article is a discussion of some solutions to this problem and a pictorial introduction to some of these 'other' pots.

Continue reading »

Monday, April 21, 2008

Gardening picture

Introduction to Echeverias- my personal experiences in Southern California
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

The following article is a discussion, from a personal experience point of view, of the Echeverias. I have grown dozens of Echeverias in pots and in the ground in Southern California and consider them one of the best and easiest plants to grow in this climate. There are hundreds of Echeveria species of which only a fraction are available in cultivation, but I have tried to grow many of these available species (though I certainly have not tried them all). In addition the the species, there is a seemingly infinite number of Echeveria hybrids available and I will discuss a few of these as well.

Continue reading »

Wednesday, April 16, 2008

Gardening picture

Bug Poisons from a Veterinary Perspective
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Being a veterinarian and a pet owner I sometimes have a different perspective when it comes to battling garden insects as many of the toxins we use to casually use in our garden can be potentially quite hazardous to ours pets. I see a lot of poisoning cases in the veterinary emergeny room, most from toxins meant for rodents or bugs. This article is an attempt to familiarize the reader with some of the more common dangerous and less dangerous insecticides available for use to the general public.

Continue reading »

Saturday, April 12, 2008

Gardening picture

Snail and slug control from a veterinary perspective
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

This article discusses some of the slug and snail control products and the dangers of some of these products to our own pets.

Continue reading »

Wednesday, April 9, 2008

Gardening picture

Toxins used in the Garden from a Veterinary Perspective- the Rodenticides
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

In our constant efforts to battle the forces of nature while attempting to create our own perfect versions of nature (our gardens), we are often 'forced' to use substances to thwart or even kill garden pests. This article discusses some of the toxins used to kill rodents, but what deadly consequences those may have on our own pets.

Continue reading »

Saturday, April 5, 2008

Gardening picture

Introduction to the Chamaedorea Palms- excellent genus for both out and indoor use
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Chamaedorea palms are a large genus of Central and South American palms that include some of the most commonly grown and attractive species in the whole world. This article is an introduction to many of the more commonly grown species in cultivation along with a few comments on cultivation and availability, along with at least one photo of each.

Continue reading »

Thursday, April 3, 2008

Gardening picture

Snakes- Good for the Garden
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Most people seem to have an innate fear and loathing of snakes, which sometimes works out for the snakes (people leave them alone) and sometimes it doesn't (people kill them when they find them in their gardens). There is no way I can convince someone who is terrified of snakes not to be, but perhaps a discussion of their benefits and harmlessness to the garden will deter a few would-be killers of these wonderful and efficient garden predators.

Continue reading »

Saturday, March 29, 2008

Gardening picture

One Technique for Painting Succulents with Watercolors
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

This article is an introduction on how to do some watercolor paintings of some of the simpler succulents (aloes, agaves etc.). Some painting tips will be mentioned and some sample paintings will be shown as they develop from start to finish.

Continue reading »

Friday, March 21, 2008

Gardening picture

20 great and overlooked palms for marginal Mediterranean climates
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

The Mediterranean climate is a marginal climate for growing palms though there are literally hundreds of species that can be grown in such climates (comparable to the drier USDA zones 9b-10a climatic zones- eg. southern France and Italy, Southern California, Sydney Australia etc.). These are all basically mild, minimally humid to nearly desert-like subtropical climates in which most truly tropical palms cannot survive, but ones where killing frosts are infrequent. Most landscapers and growers are well aware of the common and hardy palms that grow in these climates, and make good use of them frequently. However, there are other excellent choices that are less well known. And that is the point of this article, to give the reader 20 more excellent palms for their climate that maybe not too many others have and that can be potentially great landscape additions to their yards or businesses.

Continue reading »

Saturday, March 8, 2008

Gardening picture

Welcome to my toxic, painful garden
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

My garden is a living collection of some of the most hazardous plants one can grow, from both a toxic and physical danger point of view. Yet I and my pets, and friends all manage to survive the experience of repeatedly wandering through it. OSHA would never sanction this plant collection due to the potential legal ramifcations of injury. But after one gets over the usual paranoia about eyes being poked out and pets and children being killed by all the toxic greenery, reality sets in and one starts to put things into perspective. In this article, that is what I will attempt to do.

Continue reading »

Monday, February 25, 2008

Gardening picture

The Encephalartos Species: THE collector genus of cycad
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Most cycads are excellent landscape and potted plants choices and most tend to be sought after by thousands of collectors who love these plants (sometimes a bit too much). But all the cycad genera Encephalartos are easily the most popular and sought after (hence, the most expensive, too). All Encephalartos sepces are considered endangered (though some are actually not currently threatened) making the struggle of collecting them that much more costly and difficult. Few collectors are obsessed wtih common, 'everyday' species of plants, so it shouldn't surprise anyone that this is one of the most over-collected and prized of all the succulent plants. The following article is an introduction to most of the species one might encounter in their pursuit of learning and collecting these rare and beautiful plants.

Continue reading »

Saturday, February 23, 2008

Gardening picture

Pruning Palms
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Though few give much thought to pruning palms, it is a large source of income for some... and a constant source of aggravation for me. Palms are much simpler trees than most other trees one might need to trim, having no branches (rare exceptions)- just leaves on a pole. However it is amazing to me how often palms are either pruned improperly, unecessarily or even fatally. This article will cover some of the basics of pruning palms with some guidelines about when to prune, when not to, and what palms should or shouldn't be pruned from a health as well as artisitic point of view.

Continue reading »

Wednesday, January 16, 2008

Gardening picture

Introduction to Tree Aloes, part 2: the branching tree aloes
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Tree aloes are some of the most magnificent of all the succulents and can be awesome and imposing landscape statements. Most of the branching tree aloes are exceptionally neat and tidy-looking plants and are some of the most useful and valuable plants for use in xeriscape landscapes throughout the arid, warmer climates of the world. The following article is a brief introduction to some of these aloes, including some cultivational information and photos to aid in helping identify these plants in the nursery as well as in botanical gardens and private landscapes.

Continue reading »

Saturday, January 5, 2008

Gardening picture

An introduction to Aloe Flowers, part 4 of 5: Aloes S-Z
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

This pictorial article is the 4th of an alphabetical introduction to some of the most magnificent flowering succulents. Aloes are one of the best and most used landscape plants, coming in a huge variety of sizes, shapes and colors. But if that were not enough to attract a collector's attention, many aloes also have some of the best flowers of all the succulents, rivaling the most spectacular flowers of all plants. The following is a continued alphabetical listing, as an introduction to this species many floral presentations as witnessed in Southern California.

Continue reading »

Wednesday, January 2, 2008

Gardening picture

Introduction to Tree Aloes, part 1: the solitary, unbranched species
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

There are few more impressive trees that are as care-free, magnificently flowered and are living works of southwestern-landscape art all at the same time, as are the solitary tree aloes. There are dozens of tree aloe species and all have their unique flowers, leaves and statements to make. The following article is a brief description of some of the solitary tree aloes (those with a single trunk and no branches) in cultivation, including flower description, some notes on cultivation, and some discussion on how to tell them apart. Part 2 will be a discussion of the tree aloes that branch (later article).

Continue reading »

Thursday, December 20, 2007

Gardening picture

Plant-related food toxins of the Holidays and your pets
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Many foods are often associated with the holidays and are enjoyed by millions every winter near the New Year. Some of these foods, it turns out, though seemingly safe for us humans, may not be so for our pets. The following is a brief overview of some plant-related foods that are potential toxins for your dog and cat.

Continue reading »

Sunday, November 4, 2007

Gardening picture

An introduction to Aloe Flowers, part 1 of 5: Aloes A-C
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

Aloes are one of the most popular landscape and potted succulent plants grown in cultivation. They vary in size from barely 1" tall to over 40' tall and nearly as wide. They come in a variety of shades of blue, green, grey, purple, red etc. and a nearly equal variety of shapes. And, as a group, they are relatively easy, carefree plants to grow. If they never flowered they would still be extremely popular plants for gardeners, collectors, landscapers and public gardens. But they have the fantastic additional attraction of making an enormous and breathtaking variety of beautiful and fascinating flowers. This extra 'perk' makes aloes one of the premier choices of all succulent plants one can grow. The following is a pictorial introduction to aloe flowers that can be enjoyed in cultivated plants in the southwest US. This article will cover just the Aloe species starting with the letters a-c. Subsequent articles will provide examples of some of the rest.

Continue reading »

Monday, October 29, 2007

Gardening picture

Blue Fan Palms for the desert landscape- unique trees for both public and private parks and gardens
By Geoff Stein (palmbob)

The following discussion covers 7 species of uniquely blue fan palms that are excellent landscape trees for low desert areas where frost is not a severe problem, but excessive heat can be a common occurence (eg. southern California, western Mexico, the Mediterranean, South Africa, Australian deserts etc.).

Continue reading »

« Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America