Holland's Keukenhof Gardens: Sixty Years of Spectacular Spring Flowers
Photo by Melody

Holland's Keukenhof Gardens: Sixty Years of Spectacular Spring Flowers

By Jill M. Nicolaus (critterologist)April 2, 2009
bookmark

My husband had a conference in Amsterdam recently, and as soon as I discovered the Keukenhof would open its season that week I knew I had to make the trip with him. I'd admired the world's most spectacular display of spring flowering bulbs for years in magazines and gardening catalogs and was overjoyed at the thought of seeing the gardens in person.

Gardening pictureQueen Beatrix Opens the Keukenhof's 60th Season

Her Majesty Queen Beatrix visited the gardens in honor of its 60th Anniversary, baptizing the new 'Spring Garden' tulip during the opening celebration. I had asked about visiting the gardens just prior to opening day, to talk to some of the people putting the finishing touches on the facilities and displays. But when I arrived on my arranged day, I found a flurry of preparation and security arrangements in preparation for the Queen's arrival, making it impossible for me to remain on the grounds. I don't know how our wires got crossed like that, but I certainly understood that the Queen's visit took precedencestaging area with large round short and tall planters filled with blooming spring bulbs over mine! Opening Day was blessed with blue sky weather, and I'm sure Queen Beatrix enjoyed the gardens as much as I did when I returned.

Extensive bed of sprouting tulip leaves accented with yellow crocus and blue iris

purple hyacinths blooming in a huge low round planterPeak Bloom Time

Late April is generally the best time to visit the park. Whether spring comes early or late, tulips will fill the beds by then, and the weather turns sunny and mild. close up of purple striped crocus bloomsDuring the first week of the season, I saw more tulip leaves than blooms in the outdoor beds, but that didn't mean I was deprived of flowers. The beds are planted with layers of bulbs, including early-blooming crocuses, squill (Scilla siberiaca) and little Dutch irises (Iris reticulata). Planters of forced bulbs brighten the views, and the indoor pavilion areas offer a festival of blooms as well as informational exhibits all season long.

Seven Million Bulbs

Every year, growers in the Netherlands donate seven million bulbs to be planted in the 32 hectares of display gardens at the Keukenhof. sponsor's sign by a bed filled with purple crocusSince its inception, the garden has served to showcase Holland's bulbs, from old favorites to new must-have varieties. With 800,000 visitors each year, the gardens offer growers a good venue for boosting sales. See something you like? Most of the flowers in the displays are labeled, with a sign nearby indicating which company donated the bulbs, so it's easy to figure out where to obtain your new favorites.

There are bulbs for sale,too. I stopped at the pavilion belonging to the oldest bulb company at the gardens, Frylink & Zonen. Unfortunately, at this time of year there are no bulbs available with the all important inspection stamp that would let me bring them back into the USA, so I could only look, and sigh longingly. You can purchase bulbs for later delivery, however. Although I didn't order any on the spot, I made sure to get on the catalog mailing list so I could dream about my fall order.

 

tulip beds inside pavillion with pink tulips in front 

 

closeup of double tulip bloom in many shades of pink

 

 

yellow tulip blooms with one bloom opened wide to show striking dark centerFlowers under Glass 

Earlier in the season, the huge indoor space of the Willem Alexander pavilion is filled with tulips on one side and daffodils on the other, more varieties than I've seen anywhere other than one of the major bulb supplier catalogs. white daffodil with flat brilliant orange cupAfter a given variety has passed the peak of its perfection, it is removed and replaced by a display of lilies. By the end of the season, the wonderful scent of the lilies is so strong it wafts out the pavilion doors to perfume the surrounding garden.

 square of bicolor yellow daffs in a sea of foliage and blooms 

 

elgant spray of peach and magenta orchidsThe Beatrice orchid with vivid magenta dashed markings across white petalsPavilion is given over to a fabulous display of orchids and decorated further by groups of bright bromeliads. The riot of color in this space almost seems at odds with the cool elegance of individual sprays of orchid blooms.

 

selection of orchid stems in vases

 

young boy near the edge of a landscaped streamWater Music

I knew the Keukenhof was famous for its two swans in lake with large fountain spray behind themstream-shaped flower beds, but I didn't realize I'd find water features virtually everywhere in the park. From a lake with a stepping stone pathway through the water to curving rock-edged streams studded with waterfalls, water is as much a theme in the garden as the flowers themselves. Formal fountains serve as focal points in some areas, while small bell-shaped sprays of water elsewhere provide more subtle accents.flower decked bow of tour boat on canal by early spring bulb field  Next to the Keukehnof's landmark windmill, a peaceful canal separates the gardens from the bulb fields beyond. Later in the season, people will be able to tour the bulb fields in small boats with quiet electric motors.people walking along stepping stones set into the water of the lake

 yellow crocus in front of info billboard with old photo of yards in QueensThe New Amsterdam Connection

New York began as the Dutch settlement of yellow tulips in a city square surrounded by tall buildingsNew Amsterdam, established 400 years ago by Henry Hudson. The Keukenhof's newest display celebrates the links between the Netherlands and the USA. An avenue of educational billboards with old photographs explains the heritage of neighborhoods such as Harlem (named for the Dutch town of Haarlem) and the Bronx (from Bronk's River, after the sea captain who was the area's first recorded European settler).

In one of the newest areas of the garden, a large bed of white tulips edged with 'Blue Star' Muscari has been planted in the shape of the head and upraised arm of the Statue of Liberty. The outline of the Lady was clearly visible when I visited, although only the bulbs had only just begun to sprout.

profile of statue of liberty in tulip leaves with blue outline added

If You Go

This year, the Keukenhof will be open to the public daily from 8 am until 7:30 pm through May 21. blue Connexxion bus 58 to KeukenhofFrom Amsterdam or Leiden, the easiest and most economical way to get there is to purchase a "combi-ticket" covering your entrance fee and your bus fare over and back again. Bus 58 runs every 10-15 minutes during the season, making it easy to find a ride that suits your schedule. Or you could consider renting a car in order to continue your tour by driving through the nearby bulb growing region.

Don't forget your camera, and be sure to take notes so you can add your favorite varieties to your own garden next fall!yellow-orange tulips with purple and white crocus blooms

 

 

 

Move your mouse over the images and links above for additional information (let your cursor hover on the image for a moment or two, and a caption will pop up).

 

Thanks to Herbie43 for the wonderful photo of tulips in New York City.  All other photos by Jill M. Nicolaus.

Special thanks to the communications office and Annemarie Gerard for arranging an unforgettable tour with master gardener André Beijk.  For a gardener's perspective on the Keukenhof, see "Planting Seven Million Bulbs" and "Preparing for Seven Million Blooms."

 

Thanks also to Dick van Ruiten of Frylink & Zonen, for entertaining my questions and adding me to their mailing list.


  About Jill M. Nicolaus  
Jill M. NicolausBetter known as "Critter" on DG, Jill lives in Frederick, MD, where she tries to fit as many plants as possible into a suburban back yard. The birds are mobbing our feeders lately, so Sunshine Girl and I have a job keeping the Flyby Cafe' open for business! This year, we put out a special feeder just for the squirrels, filled with a seed & corn blend. We still see them acrobatically snatching food from the other feeders, but at least now they let the birds get a beak in edgewise! (Images in my articles are from my photos, unless otherwise credited.)

  Helpful links  
Share on Facebook Share on Stumbleupon

[ Mail this article | Print this article ]

» Read articles about: Spring Gardening, Bulbs, Tulips, Public Gardens, Keukenhof

» Read more articles written by Jill M. Nicolaus

« Check out our past articles!



Discussion about this article:
SubjectTopic StarterRepliesViewsLast Post
Loved your article. edyhill 5 21 Apr 7, 2009 8:27 PM
Keukenhof, Netherlands grannymari 1 11 Apr 6, 2009 8:42 PM
What a treat! Fleurs 2 4 Apr 6, 2009 7:11 PM
Proud of my Dutch Heritage seeing this! JElisabeth 1 9 Apr 6, 2009 3:31 PM
Garden art at Kukenhof NLaw 1 12 Apr 6, 2009 1:25 PM
Real Nice phicks 5 26 Apr 3, 2009 1:09 AM
Thanks! wind 1 10 Apr 3, 2009 1:07 AM
Aid Station Supplies a Clothes Dryer.. melvatoo 3 50 Apr 3, 2009 1:07 AM
Fabulous! Dea 5 32 Apr 2, 2009 4:13 PM
W-O-W!!!! DaylilyDiva219 8 46 Apr 2, 2009 12:47 PM
You cannot post until you login.


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America