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Worst Winter Weeds: Hairy Bittercress

By Toni Leland (tonilelandMarch 6, 2014
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Spring is in the air, little green things are popping up all over, and we all heave a sigh of relief that the blanket of white stuff is finally gone. But beneath the snow that stopped everything in its tracks lurks a hardy, robust little puff of tiny green leaves that virtually grows before your eyes.

Gardening picture

(This article was originally published on March 29, 2010.  Your comments are welcome but please be aware that authors of previously published articles may not be able to respond to your questions or comments.)

Call it what you will - hairy bittercress, winter bittercress, hairy cress, popping cress - Cardamine hirsuta - is a weed that tries the most forgiving gardener's patience. Growing worldwide (except in the Antarctic, this genus of the Brassicaceae family numbers more than 150 species, both annual and perennial. The plant is self-pollinating and in bloom throughout the year. It loves moist soil and grows aggressively under those conditions.
bittercress
As the snow melts, tiny white, pink, or lavender flowers begin to appear. Yes, flowers. This tenacious weed is short-lived, which is good, you say. A life cycle of 6 weeks doesn't seem like such a big deal. Think again - how many 6-week cycles are there in a year?

One of the biggest problems with bittercress is that, by the time you discover you have a problem, it's almost too late to do anything about it. The first flowers appear in late February or early March, quickly form seed pods, and mature. If you touch those trigger-happy seed pods, it's all over - the pods explode, distributing seeds over an area up to 36 inches around each plant. Those seeds will germinate and begin sprouting with a few days and the cycle begins again, only over a larger area. Small to medium size plants produce about 600 seeds, and larger plants can yield up to 1,000 seeds.

Hairy bittercress is not invasive enough to warrant using herbicides. As soon as new plants appear in February or March, begin pulling them; these are the
offspring of the previous fall's seed crop. Through the season, always pull the seedlings when you see them; they have shallow roots and come away quite easily; however, bits of root left behind are capable of re-rooting under optimum conditions. The key is to get the plants before they set seed, which happens quickly after blooming. Eradicating this weed from large areas is almost impossible, unless you can hoe and remove. Keeping bittercress out of the flower beds is a little easier, but requires diligent hand-weeding to stay ahead of the seed formation. The leaves release a pungent aroma when bruised.

Hairy bittercress is a problem in greenhouses and nurseries, so be sure to clear off the top 2 to 3 inches of soil before planting anything you purchase. Scoop the soil into a plastic bag and dis
seedscard. Keep a close watch on newly planted containers, especially those that are positioned near flower beds. The propulsion factor of bittercress seeds can sneak new plants into your containers while you aren't looking. Hairy bittercress is a real problem near flagstone patios or walks, brick work, or any hard-scaping that has space between the pieces. This weed does not need much to set down roots - even a small amount of sand between two bricks is plenty.

As mentioned before, at least the seedlings are easy to pull.


  About Toni Leland  
Toni LelandToni Leland has been writing for over 20 years. As a spokesman for the Ohio State University Master Gardener program, she has written a biweekly newspaper column and is the editor of the Muskingum County MG newsletter, Connections; she currently writes for GRIT, Over the Back Fence, and Country Living magazines. She has been a gardener all her life, working soil all over the world. In her day job, she scripts and produces educational DVDs about caring for Miniature Horses, writes and edits books about them, and has published five novels.

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Discussion about this article:
SubjectTopic StarterRepliesViewsLast Post
And the good news is... bolino 8 76 Mar 6, 2014 4:20 PM
Hairy Bittercress dottiek 1 19 Feb 1, 2012 3:39 AM
And in the West we have . . . the_naturalist 1 11 Feb 1, 2012 3:34 AM
The bane of my existence flowAjen 7 59 Jan 31, 2012 10:21 AM
Tha nasty little green thing dordee 0 11 Jan 30, 2012 10:06 AM
Bittercress & Chickweed Mjardin 0 10 Jan 30, 2012 8:38 AM
good vs bad weeds treesmoocher 0 11 Jan 30, 2012 7:44 AM
Battle of the Bittercress Caedi25 10 75 Jan 30, 2012 7:37 AM
But it's so cute! Loligo 6 56 Apr 2, 2010 3:58 AM
Bittercress LeBug 2 33 Mar 30, 2010 7:13 AM
So THAT's what that is Terry 2 30 Mar 30, 2010 6:58 AM
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