Photo by Melody
Congratulations to all our photo contest participants! Check out the winning photos here. We will have the 2015 calendars available to order from Zazzle soon.

Devil in a Green Dress; 9 Years Later

By Paul Rodman (paulgrowMarch 21, 2011
bookmark

The devastation this pest has caused on the millions of ash trees in Michigan is unbelievable. What follows is an update as to where this insect has traveled and what’s being done to control its damage.

Gardening pictureBack in the fall of 2007 I wrote an article titled, "Devil in a Green Dress" that described the assault of the Emerald Ash Borer in Michigan.  In 2001 or 2002 in a suburb of Detroit some auto parts from Asia were unloaded at an auto supplier. As with most industrial shipments the cargo had traveled on wooden pallets to ensure easy handling. Little did anyone know lurking in those pallets was a pest that would change the landscape of the Midwest forever.

That pest was the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis. County Extension Hotlines and Professional Arborists began to get calls about Ash trees that were dropping leaves and dying for no apparent reason.  I had firsthand knowledge of this situation as I had two Green Ash trees in my yard that were displaying the same symptoms. Dieback began at the top of the canopy and worked its way downward.

Entomologists from Michigan State University and the U.S. Forest Service were called in and finally identified the problem. An immediate quarantine of six southeastern Michigan counties was implemented with hopes of stopping the spread of the EAB. It was initially thought that this insect was only capable of flying a half-mile per year.

I was fortunate or maybe unfortunate enough to be heavily involved with Michigan State University Extension Service through my volunteer work with the Master Gardeners.

Educational programs were quickly put together to instruct the public about this pest and encourage them not to move firewood outside of the quarantine zones. We were speeding the word via, newspapers, television, radio--anyway we could.

Sadly it was too little too late, experts were amazed at the speed at which the EAB was moving.

It was moving not only by flight, but by folks hauling infested firewood to their cottages. It was also hitching rides on nursery trees and logs for lumber.

Many of the subdivisions built in the 1960s and '70s had been landscaped exclusively with ash trees.  They make great street trees, nice shape and  fast-growing. By 2005 most of these trees had succumbed and these subdivisions looked like war zones with dead trees for block after block.

When the EAB was initially discovered, most governmental and university sources believved it was was 100% fatal. The only control was to cut the tree down and "chip" it to ensure the bugs were dead. Later they discovered that the EAB could survive a "chipper". However progress was being made quickly in controlling the EAB.

In 2004 soil drenches of imidacloprid began to show promise of eradicating the EAB. As of today this product seems to be very effective at controlling this pest. There are also products available that are injected directly into the tree that are quite effective.

The EAB has infected Ash trees in 14 states and Canada. After arriving in Michigan, it has traveled as far west as Missouri, Iowa, and Minnesota, as far south as Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia, and east to New York and Pennsylvania, including all of the states in between.

If you have an ash that begins to drop leaves or wilts or if you see a tree with these symptoms in a park or other area, let someone know. These trees can be saved. You now have a defense that those of us in Michigan didn't have back in 2002. Of the millions of ashes that grew in Michigan I estimate that 95% have been lost to the EAB. Don't let that happen to your trees.

My thanks to Dr. David Roberts of Michigan State University (The EAB GURU) for  of this information.  Dr. Roberts spearheaded much of the research in control of this pest.


  About Paul Rodman  
Paul RodmanPaul Rodman has been gardening for over 45 years. He is an Advanced Master Gardener, and American Rose Society Consulting Rosarian. He is President Emertius of the Western Wayne County Master Gardener Association in Wayne County, Michigan. He currently serves as the greenhouse chairman of this group. Rodman has amassed over 5500 volunteer hours in the Master Gardener program. Rodman is the garden columnist for The News Herald newspaper, in Southgate, Michigan. He has also written for the Organic Gardening.com web site. He is a certified Master Canner and has taught classes on Home Food Preserving for 7 years. He has lectured on various gardening topics throughout southeastern Michigan. His favorite pastime is teaching children about gardening. For the past several years he has conducted classes for second grade students teaching them about subjects ranging from vermi-composting to propagation.

  Helpful links  
Share on Facebook Share on Stumbleupon

[ Mail this article | Print this article ]

» Read articles about: Emerald Ash Borer, Pests And Diseases

» Read more articles written by Paul Rodman

« Check out our past articles!



Discussion about this article:
SubjectTopic StarterRepliesViewsLast Post
Saving the ash tree. JohnK43346 2 52 Mar 28, 2011 4:32 AM
Is the war lost? diggerdane 3 62 Mar 24, 2011 7:02 PM
imidacloprid and bees ArabellaMay 0 9 Mar 24, 2011 6:32 PM
There is a preventive treatment available. kmm44 0 18 Mar 22, 2011 11:06 AM
ash borer and lilacs gardeningmaniac 1 30 Mar 21, 2011 3:18 PM
You cannot post until you login.


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America