Dave's Garden Book Review: Forget-Her-Nots
Photo by Melody

Dave's Garden Book Review: Forget-Her-Nots

By Melody Rose (melody)January 14, 2012
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Gardeners love books, as the number of titles devoted to the subject attest. We hope this spotlight on some of our members' favorites is a nice change of pace for your Saturday morning.

Gardening picture  Forget Her Nots by: Amy Brecount White

Image"When you take a flower in your hand and really look at it, it's your world for the moment" Georgia O'Keeffe-American Painter, 1887-1986

This book was not what I originally thought it would be. The setting and storyline were at first glance more suitable for young teens, and while it is a wonderful book for them, it speaks to flower-lovers of every age.

Fourteen year old Laurel enrolls in an historic boarding school after her mother's death and discovers herself an outsider and unprepared for the cliquish society that she finds there. Homesick and missing her mother, she gets little comfort, even from her older cousin, Rose.

She finds a small bouquet of outside her dorm door as she was working on a report on the language of flowers. The scent made her lightheaded and tingly. Things became increasingly complicated as Laurel searched for hidden messages in letters from her mother and as she learned more about hidden meanings in flowers.

By combining flowers and herbs in Victorian ‘tussie-mussies', Laurel helped a teacher find romance. Seeing the result, some of the girls asked for their own flowers to attract the boys at the neighboring boy's academy. Wanting to fit in, Laurel tries to accommodate the requests, often with disastrous results. As these events transpire, Laurel finds that women in her family might have had this gift in common for generations, including her mother and grandmother. She discovers the flowers help heal the grief over her mother's death and finds some unlikely mentors along the way.  There's a little magic and a touch of fantasy, but the meanings and attributes associated with certain flowers have been noted for centuries.

Dogwood is for love undiminished by adversity and forsythia is for anticipation. Combine those with Lily-of-the valley (return of happiness) and cedar (strength). The resulting tussie-mussie would mean that even though there have been difficult times, the person is strong and should look forward to happier days.

This is well-crafted and even though it is intended for young teens, I was moved by the story (you may need a tissue or two handy) and thoroughly enjoyed the book. Every flower has a secret and this might be a unique way of generating gardening interest in teens. Even though the magic remains between the pages, Victorian flower language is magical in itself. Here are four tussie-mussies that I created just for this review and their meanings. I hope this inspires you to take a fresh look at the bouquets from your garden. I know that I will!

Gwen Bruno wrote a lovely article about the Victorians and their flower language and you can read it at this link:   The Language of Flowers

Find this book and similar titles in our Garden Bookworm.

 

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Lily-of-the Valley and Rosemary:

Lily-of-the-Valley for return of happiness

Rosemary for rememberance

This might be given to someone who has lost a loved one.

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Forget-me-Nots and Dogwood:

Forget-me-Nots for true love, or forget me not

Dogwood for love undiminished by adversity

A good gift for a soldier, or from a soldier.

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Rose, Forsythia and Ivy:

Rose for love

Forsythia for anticipation

Ivy for matrimony

This could be a wedding bouquet, or something that might accompany a proposal of marriage

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Forsythia and Lily-of-the-Valley

Forsythia for anticipation

Lily-of-the Valley for return of happiness

This could be for loved ones who are separated, or possibly given after a house fire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


  About Melody Rose  
Melody RoseI come from a long line of Kentuckians who love the Good Earth. I love to learn about every living thing, and love to share what I've learned. Photography is one of my passions, and all of the images in my articles are my own, except where credited.

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» Read articles about: Book Review, Teen's Books, Language Of Flowers, Victorian Flower Meanings

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Discussion about this article:
SubjectTopic StarterRepliesViewsLast Post
BEAUTIFUL book! psychw2 1 15 Jan 14, 2012 5:18 PM
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