A Winter Oasis for Your Houseplants
Photo by Melody

A Winter Oasis for Your Houseplants

By Jill M. Nicolaus (critterologist)December 3, 2012
bookmark

Cold, dry winter weather exactly the conditions most tropical houseplants do NOT like. Create an oasis for them, and make a tranquil green space for yourself as well!

Gardening picture

Gardeners tend to accumulate plants indoors over the winter. Tender perennials that graced our patio containers beg to be saved from the first freeze and end up crowding our windowsills. On gray winter days, those bright tropicals at the store just jump into our shopping carts. Amaryllises, Christmas cactus, and other "holiday" bloomers fill any remaining sunny spots.  After they've bloomed for this year, we can't just throw them out!

How can we accommodate all these winter houseguests?

shelf with window box and trailing plant

Central heating keeps both humans and plants from freezing, but indoor air can get pretty dry in winter.  Some plants can handle an occasional chilly windowsill, while others curl up their leaves at the least draft.  Trays of gravel and water help provide extra humidity, but for many rain forest types, it's just not enough.  If you're looking for additional plant space in your home, consider a room that's more humid and draft-free by design -- your bathroon!

Those small high windows in some bathrooms just beg to have a hanging plant in front of them. corner of gravel tray under window boxMaybe there's space for a plant shelf over a towel bar, or next to your tub. If you're a "shower person" who never uses the soaking tub in your master bath, you may have a perfect place for a grouping of large containers. It's easy to remember to water a plant that's right in front of you when you're brushing your teeth. A little corner by the sink is also a great place for a rooting vase - changing the water is quick, and the cuttings provide a splash of color.couple of sad looking orchids on a high shelf

When looking for space for some orchids several years ago, I put up shelves over the tub in our master bath. Rather than dealing with lots of little saucers that would be prone to overflowing when I watered, I found trays meant for window box planters that fit perfectly on my shelves. While shopping for the trays, I decided an actual window box would fit nicely on the lower shelf, giving me a good place for an assortment of episcias and other trailing plants. A layer of gravel in the trays lets me add extra water without drowning my plants.

The steam from your morning shower will give a big burst of welcome humidity to plants in your bathroom. hanging basket plants by shower stallFor the rest of the day, humidity trays continue adding moisture to the air right around your plants. Get creative - trays, saucers, bowls, TupperwareTM, anything that fits under your plants and holds water can be put into service. Gravel isn't the only way to raise the plant pots above the water. Setting pots on a variety of saucers, overturned pots, flat rocks, jar lids, and so forth will serve the same purpose while adding visual interest to a group of plants.

You can cram a lot of plants into a little corner while still creating an appealing display. Plant pots on floor and stool and tall pedastal Pay attention to heights and textures, just as you would outside. Small potted plants can often be tucked into "bare spots" in bigger containers for the look of a mixed planting that's also easier to water. Even if you have space to spread them out, grouping your plants into lush islands of summer-green will give them more visual impact. Also, groups of plants create their own micro-climate, moderating temperature changes and increasing local humidity.

The bathroom isn't the only possibility for an oasis grouping of plants, of course. I scatter houseplants all over, but I also love to create little "jungle spots," preferably surrounding a comfortable reading chair. With scented geraniums and jasmine, upright lemongrass and cascades of Christmas cactus, small sweet bay and key lime trees vying for overhead space with dangling spider plants and tumbling pothos, bright-blooming amaryllis and African violets, my favorite reading corner is a winter oasis for my soul.

window filled with plants in floor pots and hanging baskets

 Photos by Jill M. Nicolaus.  Hover your mouse over images and links for additional information.

 


  About Jill M. Nicolaus  
Jill M. NicolausBetter known as "Critter" on DG, Jill lives in Frederick, MD, where she tries to fit as many plants as possible into a suburban back yard. The birds are mobbing our feeders lately, so Sunshine Girl and I have a job keeping the Flyby Cafe' open for business! This year, we put out a special feeder just for the squirrels, filled with a seed & corn blend. We still see them acrobatically snatching food from the other feeders, but at least now they let the birds get a beak in edgewise! (Images in my articles are from my photos, unless otherwise credited.)

  Helpful links  
Share on Facebook Share on Stumbleupon

[ Mail this article | Print this article ]

» Read articles about: Houseplants, Tropicals

» Read more articles written by Jill M. Nicolaus

« Check out our past articles!



Discussion about this article:
SubjectTopic StarterRepliesViewsLast Post
Nice! Great idea jazzy1okc 16 52 Jan 9, 2013 5:13 AM
You cannot post until you login.


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America