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Deciduous Vines for the Garden

By Mitch Fitzgerald (MitchFJune 3, 2008
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Vines are among the most basic and simple plants to grow in the garden. They can be trained to everything, and, on the whole, they are great for whatever space you have to give them. They come back year after year and love to grow. Take a look at the world of simple to grow deciduous vines for the garden.

Gardening picture 

ImageKiwi Vine

These are robust and hardy vines that can be grown anywhere with good sun. The male and female blooms are on separate plants so be ready to plant more than one if you  want fruit. The ratio of male to female plants should be about one male for each three female plants. Thank you to kiwibob for the image.

ImageDutchman's Pipe

This twining stemmed plant is often grown for the wonderful green leaves. The foul smelling flowers are whitish-yellow and look like small pipes. The leaves can reach up to one foot long so be ready for the impact. Thank you to Monocromatico for the image.

Bittersweet

The stems have wonderfully alternated leaves, and in some areas they might be evergreen. The real show is in the fall and winter when the vine is covered in bright red berries growing in showy clusters. The berries can also be used for winter decorations and are perfect for the table centerpiece.

ImageClematis

With the biggest and best flowers of any plant in the garden, Clematis is queen of the garden.  This flower grows on weak stemmed plants that must be supported or allowed  to climb up a shrub or small tree. The roots need moist shade and the leaves need sun so they are perfect to fill special places in the garden. Thank you to TomC_UK for the image.

ImageClimbing Hydrangea

With huge white flowering clusters, this vine is in strong demand in the garden. It will climb up anything and the stems have root-like growths that will attach themselves to any surface and keep growing upward.  Hydrangea is very useful for covering a shed or garage and concealing them from the rest of the yard. Thank you to Wintermoor for the image.

ImageBoston Ivy

Love it or hate it, every gardener, in time, will have strong feelings about having this plant in the garden. The leaves have the classic garden look, the ability to climb and cling to anything, and are sought after in many areas, but they can damage a home or wall very easily. They are very useful in the right place, but think about this plant before you plant it. Thank you to JoleneS for the image.

ImageTrumpet Creeper

Want a butterfly magnet that will take full sun and never stop growing? Look no farther than the Trumpet Creeper. This plant will keep growing in the heat and drought.  It will bloom its head off on the hottest days of summer and it will bring each and every humming bird in the state to your yard. This is not a good choice if you have limited space, but if you have the room it is the perfect plant for many places. Thank you to brushwoodnursery for the image.

ImageVirginia Creeper

This is my favorite vine for the simple color of the leaves in the fall. When the bitter winds blow in fall, this plant will have strong red leaves to brighten your day.  It looks much like Poison Ivy at a distance but with leaves of five and not three. The stems have sticky pads that will climb up anything and everything. Many birds eat the berries that the flowers produce. Thank you to Floridian for the image.

ImageWisteria

This is the plant for the English or Cottage garden.  It is a stunning garden vine that can be trained into a small tree but the most powerful statement is when this plant is left to grow into the spreading vine it was born to be. There are Native American types that can be grown with ease in the smaller garden, but the biggest statement can be made with a well groomed Chinese Wisteria trained to follow a fence or roof line. Thank you to wihead for the image.


  About Mitch Fitzgerald  
Mitch FitzgeraldI am a pentecostal preacher, gardener,husband, and a father. I love natives, daylilies, iris, and roses. I love teaching others, be they children or adults, about the garden and plants.

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» Read articles about: Vines, Invasives And Weeds, Hardy Kiwi, Clematis, Hydrangeas, Virginia Creeper, Wisteria

» Read more articles written by Mitch Fitzgerald

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Discussion about this article:
SubjectTopic StarterRepliesViewsLast Post
Kiwi Vine shekinahgarden 1 31 Jun 14, 2013 4:45 PM
question? robcorreia 8 56 Jul 12, 2010 6:46 AM
trumpet vine weedsbegone 1 15 Jul 12, 2010 6:43 AM
peach vines imirish43 1 10 Mar 7, 2010 2:17 PM
Snail vine is dying from bottom up!help! ana88 1 6 Oct 17, 2009 9:43 PM
Responsible gardening DianeEG 2 39 Jun 14, 2008 4:03 AM
wisteria question shekinahgarden 4 54 Jun 12, 2008 4:30 PM
Virgina Creeper and allergic reactions jeraciszek 1 17 Jun 10, 2008 4:18 PM
Oriental Bittersweet is a weed claypa 12 106 Jun 9, 2008 7:34 PM
Thanks, Mitch for the article! Aunt_A 1 15 Jun 4, 2008 1:06 PM
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