Photo by Melody

Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)

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Order: Lepidoptera (le-pid-OP-ter-a) (Info)
Family: Papilionidae (pap-ill-lee-ON-ih-dee) (Info)
Genus: Papilio (pap-ILL-ee-oh) (Info)
Species: rutulus

Profile:

1 positive
1 neutral
No negatives

Regional...

This bug has been reportedly found in the following regions:

Chino Valley, Arizona
, California
Las Flores, California
Long Beach, California
North Fork, California
San Diego, California
Tulare, California
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Culver, Indiana
Hebron, Kentucky
Butte, Montana
Los Alamos, New Mexico
Kellyville, Oklahoma
Gold Hill, Oregon
Harbeck-fruitdale, Oregon
Carrollton, Texas
Irving, Texas
Magna, Utah
Bell Hill, Washington

By GardenGuyKin
Thumbnail #1 of Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) by GardenGuyKin

By GardenGuyKin

Thumbnail #2 of Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) by GardenGuyKin

By kennedyh

Thumbnail #3 of Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) by kennedyh

By kennedyh

Thumbnail #4 of Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) by kennedyh

By kennedyh

Thumbnail #5 of Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) by kennedyh

By carrjohn

Thumbnail #6 of Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) by carrjohn

By RaiderLep

Thumbnail #7 of Western Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) by RaiderLep

There are a total of 17 photos.
Click here to view them all!

Member Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Neutral Magpye On Aug 16, 2006, Magpye from NW Qtr, AR
(Zone 6a) wrote:

Wing span: 2 3/4 - 4 inches (7 - 10 cm).

Identification: Upperside of hindwing with upper-most marginal spot yellow or lacking. Underside of forewing with separate yellow spots forming marginal band. Hindwing has narrow marginal spots and no orange tint except for 2 spots near end of inner margin.

Life history: Males patrol canyons or hilltops for receptive females. Females lay eggs singly on surface of host plant leaves. Caterpillars feed on leaves and rest on silken mats in shelters of curled leaves. Chrysalids hibernate.

Flight: One flight from June-July.

Caterpillar hosts: Leaves of cottonwood and aspen (Populus), willows (Salix), wild cherry (Prunus), and ash (Fraxinus).

Adult food: Nectar from many flowers including thistles, abelia, California buckeye, zinnia, and yerba santa.

Habitat: Woodlands near rivers and streams, wooded suburbs, canyons, parks, roadsides, and oases.

Range: Western North America from British Columbia south to southern New Mexico and Baja California; east to western South Dakota and southeast Colorado. A rare stray to central Nebraska.

Positive caobr549 On Sep 13, 2010, caobr549 from Tupelo, MS wrote:

I've seen two Eastern Tiger Swallowtails in my backyard in the last two weeks, I can't remember seeing one here before. They are absolutely gorgeous! I have a wild cherry tree, so I hope one of them left some eggs on it for my enjoyment next year.

Timer: 6.72 jiffies (0.067162990570068).


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