Photo by Melody

Stink Bug, Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys)

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Order: Hemiptera (he-MIP-ter-a) (Info)
Family: Pentatomidae (pen-ta-TOM-id-ee) (Info)
Genus: Halyomorpha
Species: halys

Profile:

No positives
1 neutral
13 negatives

Regional...

This bug has been reportedly found in the following regions:

Chester, Connecticut
La Fontaine, Indiana
Litchfield, Maine
Ellicott City, Maryland
Gwynn Oak, Maryland
Ijamsville, Maryland
Owings Mills, Maryland
Windsor Mill, Maryland
Flemington, New Jersey
Marlboro, New Jersey
North Brunswick, New Jersey
Trenton, New Jersey
Canton, Ohio
Columbus, Ohio
Aliquippa, Pennsylvania
Elizabeth, Pennsylvania
Homestead, Pennsylvania
Hummelstown, Pennsylvania
Lebanon, Pennsylvania
Millersville, Pennsylvania
Morrisville, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Pottstown, Pennsylvania
West Chester, Pennsylvania
Culpeper, Virginia
Midland, Virginia
Penhook, Virginia
Roanoke, Virginia
Wytheville, Virginia
Shepherdstown, West Virginia

By claypa
Thumbnail #1 of Stink Bug, Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) by claypa

By claypa

Thumbnail #2 of Stink Bug, Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) by claypa

By claypa

Thumbnail #3 of Stink Bug, Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) by claypa

By Bharat_Sanghavi

Thumbnail #4 of Stink Bug, Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) by Bharat_Sanghavi

By drobarr

Thumbnail #5 of Stink Bug, Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) by drobarr

By drobarr

Thumbnail #6 of Stink Bug, Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (Halyomorpha halys) by drobarr

Member Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Negative claypa On Aug 14, 2008, claypa from West Pottsgrove, PA
(Zone 6b) wrote:

The Brown Marmorated (marbled) Stinkbug is a recent invader in America that has the potential to become a serious agricultural pest. It was discovered in eastern Pennsylvania in the last decade or so, and is spreading. They're not too picky about what they eat, and they enter homes for shelter in winter.

Negative JCdigit On Aug 15, 2008, JCdigit from La Fontaine, IN
(Zone 5a) wrote:

these bugs are definately not picky with thier eating habbits. I have observed them in great numbers coming in with the harvested grains in mid northern Indiana the last 5 years. Along with others these stink bugs add a great deal of proteen to americas grain harvests.

Negative wvgrows On Oct 15, 2008, wvgrows from Morgantown, WV
(Zone 6a) wrote:

Have been inundated by this bug this fall--I live in a log cabin (oddly painted white and logs stained black!) in a small town in WV close to VA border. Have had NUMEROUS of these bugs landing on and invading house this fall...Oddly, I have not noticed them in my gardens here but perhaps there's nothing exciting for them to eat. I thought it was the white/black colors of Charming Cottage attracting them, but co-workers in another zipcode have observed similar infestation. They smell horrible when squashed, and appear "out of nowhere" in all parts of cottage, kitchen and upstairs in BR. Extremely annoying and I don't like to spray.
I am posting to add to distribution list, but have not seen them on any plants in perennial or mixed perennial/veg gardens here--just on( and in!) the house. At former home in Northern Panhandle of WV, had extensive rasperry bed and would encounter common brown stink bug but never these, and never on or in house.

Negative mojitomadness On Feb 1, 2009, mojitomadness from Marlboro, NJ wrote:

I found these for the first time in my home (central NJ) this winter (Jan. 2009) (3 so far). I found one inside a cardboard box that I brought down from my attic around the holidays. I may have seen one or two in my garden last year, tho I'm not positive. I've been reading up on them, and it sounds like they are a sure pest in the garden and their territory is spreading! Does anyone know what their "stink" smells like? I'm afraid to crush one!!!!

Neutral sallyg On Feb 28, 2009, sallyg from Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b) wrote:

I didn't notice them in the garden but have found five or six in the house this winter. Here's a site that requests reporting your finds by filling in a few questions.
http://njaes.rutgers.edu/stinkbug/identify.asp
and sending the specimen

Negative gaddict On Mar 1, 2009, gaddict from North Brunswick, NJ wrote:

We started getting them in our house last year and if we get the least warm day in winter, they appear. The knock up against the lights in the ceiling fan & are very annoying. I did have them outside and they seemed to like my 4 o'clocks and hanging out in a huge snake plant.

Negative dirtydigs On Jan 17, 2011, dirtydigs from Flemington, NJ wrote:

Stink bugs are a big problem in our home as well as in all the homes on my street. We have been under siege the last three years. Pest companies have sprayed to no avail. We have vacuumed thousands, sometimes five hundred a day. Thank goodness for our in wall vacuum, neighbors have tossed their plug in vacuums because they smelled so bad from the bugs. It is January and I still see three or more a day. I hope help is on the way.

Negative KariHoltz On Apr 3, 2011, KariHoltz from Midland, VA
(Zone 7a) wrote:

Nothing positive about these bugs. They invaded us last summer and all winter we have fought them inside, only way to get rid of them in a way they don't stink up the house is grab them in a tissue quickly and flush down the toilet. (Don't EVER use an electronic flyswatter on them, the smell is horrendous!)
We kill on average 6 a day throughout winter and every warm day we find more and more. Our garage is full of them, cars, I opened up my computer to dust the inside and found them in there! IN MY COMPUTER!!!!
I am so tired of these things. I don't know how we will ever get rid of them!

Negative ladiebaker68 On Apr 30, 2011, ladiebaker68 from Gwynn Oak, MD
(Zone 7a) wrote:

I hope this helps. I realized last year the stink bugs ate up everything EXCEPT my hot peppers. This year, I'm gonna make some pepper spray and see if that works. In my house, I catch them in empty plastic bottles and toss them out.

Negative Raykhona On Sep 25, 2011, Raykhona from Ellicott City, MD
(Zone 7b) wrote:

Brown marmorated stink bugs are an invasive species from China. They will eat just about anything. I have found them on my citrus trees, corn, tomatoes, apples, pears, peaches, berries, figs, loquats, and even habenero peppers. They are an agricultural pest on the eastern seaboard, and have the potential to cause problems with the Midwest crops and Florida citrus if they ever make it that far in large numbers. They reach their high point in mid September and I have found hundreds of them on my back porch during this time. They invade homes during the winter to keep warm, and if they manage to do this every year they can live for several years. The nymphs are small and black and cannot fly, but they turn brown and grow their wings as they reach adulthood.

They are all over the east coast and have been reported as far west as Alberta, Canada. They seem to have no natural predators in the US, and so their numbers have exploded. The USDA is considering introducing the parasitic wasp, their natural predator in China, but this is a non-native species also. You can buy pheromone traps from Rescue! (www.rescue.com) to put in your yards as well as lights to attract and trap them in your house. It helps if you put an already dead stink bug in the trap first to help attract others. Vacuum cleaners are also an effective weapon against invasions, as they can suck up large numbers at a time. Masking tape also works, as well as soapy water (soap clogs their pores and they can't breathe).

Negative FeatherJack On Aug 31, 2012, FeatherJack from Poland, ME
(Zone 5a) wrote:

I've found them all over my ArborDay.org hazelnuts this year (along with the f**king Japanese Beetles). Found some useful info here: http://www.arborday.org/programs/hazelnuts/graphics/stink-bu...
I will try dusting with diatomaceous earth and see it that slows them down at all...

Negative Bharat_Sanghavi On Sep 28, 2012, Bharat_Sanghavi from Trenton, NJ
(Zone 6b) wrote:

i found these bugs invading Ewing, NJ this Fall season. they come in hundreds. they come for shelter inside your house during noon hours. they can crawl beneath the screen also.
one GOOD thing: a spider will suck the juice out of this pest. so there is a solution here. hope the rutgers research dept do take note of this and come up with a quick and solid solution.

Negative drobarr On Jul 11, 2013, drobarr from Hummelstown, PA
(Zone 6b) wrote:

BMSB has been a problem in my area since 2009 with the worst years being in 2010-2011. Since that time populations have subsided some but this pest is still a problem. I find them in my fruit trees mostly but also in vegetable and simply along the house with many making it inside during the winter months.

Negative gardenergal17 On Apr 24, 2014, gardenergal17 from Canton (Pro Football HOF City!), OH
(Zone 6a) wrote:

This bug invaded our property in 2013. They do enter the home for the winter, and just appear (or in my case, drop out of nowhere) in very unexpected indoor places! Our cat took a sniff of one, watched it move for a bit, and then left the room, as I tried to urge her to have a "snack"!

Timer: 16.86 jiffies (0.16864609718323).


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