Photo by Melody

Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele)

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Order: Lepidoptera (le-pid-OP-ter-a) (Info)
Family: Nymphalidae (nim-FAL-ih-dee) (Info)
Genus: Speyeria (spy-ER-ee-a) (Info)
Species: cybele (SIB-uh-lee) (Info)

Profile:

2 positives
No neutrals
No negatives

Regional...

This bug has been reportedly found in the following regions:

Laceys Spring, Alabama
Deer, Arkansas
Cornelia, Georgia
Rock Falls, Illinois
Westchester, Illinois
Coatesville, Indiana
Benton, Kentucky
Hebron, Kentucky
Durham, Maine
Cole Camp, Missouri
Marshfield, Missouri
Lincoln, Nebraska
Concord, North Carolina
Cincinnati, Ohio (2 reports)
Glouster, Ohio
Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania
Jackson, Tennessee
Madison, Wisconsin

By melody
Thumbnail #1 of Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele) by melody

By Magpye

Thumbnail #2 of Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele) by Magpye

By Magpye

Thumbnail #3 of Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele) by Magpye

By Magpye

Thumbnail #4 of Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele) by Magpye

By Magpye

Thumbnail #5 of Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele) by Magpye

By DiOhio

Thumbnail #6 of Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele) by DiOhio

By Marilynbeth

Thumbnail #7 of Great Spangled Fritillary (Speyeria cybele) by Marilynbeth

There are a total of 28 photos.
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Member Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive melody On Jul 24, 2006, melody from Benton, KY
(Zone 7a) wrote:

With a wingspan of up to 3 3/4", the Great Spangled Fritillary is one of the larger Fritillaries. The silvery markings are visible with the wings folded above the body.

It is common throughout the US and Canada except for the deep south.

The caterpillar feeds on violet foliage and the butterfly prefers open woods and moist meadows.

Positive tabasco On Jun 29, 2009, tabasco from Cincinnati (Anderson Twp), OH
(Zone 6a) wrote:

The Great Spangled Fritillary visits our garden throughout the summer but the last week in June and the first weeks in July are the highpoints in the GSF population here. After those few weeks occurrences become more rare.

The GSF is not shy about nectaring in the garden~~it's one of the first butterflies to find our stand of monarda and often socializes there in small groups. They also flit in pairs among the coneflowers and swamp milkweeds as those flowers come into bloom.

They are a rather large butterfly and can be distinguished from other fritillaries by its size. Especially the female, which emerges later in the summer than the male and can be quite a bit bigger.

"Common Butterflies & Skippers of Ohio" (Ohio DNR, p. 33) notes that the GSF has a somewhat haphard reproduction habit: the female lays her eggs near but not on their host plants, violets, and the tiny caterpillars must find their way to them to feed. To complicate the feeding process, the GSF only feed at night.


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