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European Pine Sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer)

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Order: Hymenoptera (hy-men-OP-ter-a) (Info)
Family: Diprionidae
Genus: Neodiprion
Species: sertifer

Profile:

No positives
No neutrals
3 negatives

Regional...

This bug has been reportedly found in the following regions:

Spring Grove, Illinois
White Lake, Michigan
Eden Prairie, Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Cole Camp, Missouri
Casper, Wyoming

By Meig
Thumbnail #1 of European Pine Sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) by Meig

By Malus2006

Thumbnail #2 of European Pine Sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) by Malus2006

By Malus2006

Thumbnail #3 of European Pine Sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) by Malus2006

By Malus2006

Thumbnail #4 of European Pine Sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) by Malus2006

By creekwalker

Thumbnail #5 of European Pine Sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) by creekwalker

By creekwalker

Thumbnail #6 of European Pine Sawfly (Neodiprion sertifer) by creekwalker

Member Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Negative Malus2006 On Jan 27, 2008, Malus2006 from Coon Rapids, MN
(Zone 4a) wrote:

This nonnative pest eats trees of the genus Pinus. They prefer Mugo, Scotch, Red, and Jack Pine. They are not often listed in many common books. Their larvaes are the most destructive form. From observation on my Red Pine trees, the caterpillar- like larvae feed enmass on older needles, never feeding on new needles, leaving branches bare with only fresh needles on the edge, giving the tree an ugly appearance. They are easily noticed because there are many to each branch. They also leaves a good amount of dropping beneath each tree - the dropping is green and look like very tiny rabbit pellets. The larvaes feed late April to May or June.

In another area I have seen them feeding on Mugo Pines too.

Negative cecrophia On May 18, 2010, cecrophia from Casper, WY wrote:

Neodiprion feeds on Ponderosa pines in Central Wyoming. At rest, clumps of larvae mimic bunched pine needles, holding themselves very still unless disturbed. I have not witnessed birds feeding on the larvae. Kill the larvae with any product containg neem, or you can also try insecticidal soap, which I have found only marginally effective. Control eggs in needle litter beneath pine trees by raking up and burning the needles.

Negative creekwalker On May 25, 2010, creekwalker from Benton County, MO
(Zone 5a) wrote:

Very destructive! They are on all our pines here right now. Last year we managed to kill them off and our pines recovered. Now they are back, and it seems 10x more. :-(


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