Photo by Melody
Congratulations to all our photo contest participants! Check out the winning photos here. We will have the 2015 calendars available to order from Zazzle soon.

Orchard OrbWeaver, Venusta OrbWeaver (Leucauge venusta)

bookmark
Order: Araneae (ah-RAY-nee-ee) (Info)
Family: Tetragnathidae
Genus: Leucauge
Species: venusta

Profile:

2 positives
No neutrals
No negatives

Regional...

This bug has been reportedly found in the following regions:

Barling, Arkansas
Brooksville, Florida
Lake Mary, Florida
Lecanto, Florida
Lutz, Florida
Mc David, Florida
Orlando, Florida
Barnesville, Georgia
Midway, Georgia
Muncie, Indiana
New Iberia, Louisiana
New Orleans, Louisiana
Opelousas, Louisiana
Oakland, Maryland
Florence, South Carolina
Ridgeville, South Carolina
Summerville, South Carolina
Houston, Texas
Katy, Texas
Santa Fe, Texas

By Floridian
Thumbnail #1 of Orchard OrbWeaver, Venusta OrbWeaver (Leucauge venusta) by Floridian

By MrMom

Thumbnail #2 of Orchard OrbWeaver, Venusta OrbWeaver (Leucauge venusta) by MrMom

By burningwrek

Thumbnail #3 of Orchard OrbWeaver, Venusta OrbWeaver (Leucauge venusta) by burningwrek

By linda_nc

Thumbnail #4 of Orchard OrbWeaver, Venusta OrbWeaver (Leucauge venusta) by linda_nc

By trois

Thumbnail #5 of Orchard OrbWeaver, Venusta OrbWeaver (Leucauge venusta) by trois

By trois

Thumbnail #6 of Orchard OrbWeaver, Venusta OrbWeaver (Leucauge venusta) by trois

By Elphaba

Thumbnail #7 of Orchard OrbWeaver, Venusta OrbWeaver (Leucauge venusta) by Elphaba

There are a total of 23 photos.
Click here to view them all!

Member Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive trois On Nov 29, 2007, trois from Santa Fe, TX
(Zone 9b) wrote:

A very beautiful small spider. Iridescent back in sunlight.

Positive Tired_Yeti On Sep 4, 2014, Tired_Yeti from Katy, TX wrote:

About the size of a quarter (including legs). Young spiders build webs closer to the ground while older spiders build webs higher up. The female builds a web and lives on it. She lives on the underside of the web so that when you look at her from the top, you see her underside. The underside of her abdomen looks dark green with 2 orange spots and an orange, curved stripe. From a distance, it looks like a "Smilie" face. We had one who built quite a large web (approx. 3 feet). My wife named her "Pumpkin" because she reminded us of a jack-o-lantern. They are very motivated about maintaining their webs and quickly reconstruct them when damaged. I had one at the base of a tree and while I was spraying a poison ivy plant, I accidentally destroyed her web (about 2' across) with the sprayer wand. The next morning, the 2' web was back in place, completely reconstructed and she was sitting in the middle showing her "smile". They feed on insects that are lower to the ground. They seem to prefer to live near the base of trees and shrubs and collect crawling and low flying insects. Shy; not aggressive. They are very shy spiders and will drop off their webs and run for cover at any threat. I haven't heard of any reported bites on humans.


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America