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American Robin (Turdus migratorius)

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Order: Passeriformes
Family: Turdidae
Genus: Turdus
Species: migratorius

Profile:

10 positives
5 neutrals
No negatives

Regional...

This bird has been reportedly found in the following regions:

Happy Jack, Arizona
North Little Rock, Arkansas
, British Columbia
Huntington Beach, California
Stanton, California
Colorado Springs, Colorado
Denver, Colorado
North Haven, Connecticut
Beverly Hills, Florida
Daytona Beach, Florida
Jacksonville, Florida
Melbourne, Florida
Santa Rosa Beach, Florida
Trenton, Florida
Algonquin, Illinois
Cherry Valley, Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
Divernon, Illinois
Elmhurst, Illinois
Madison, Illinois
Westchester, Illinois
Coatesville, Indiana
Highland, Indiana
Indianapolis, Indiana
Polk City, Iowa
Sioux City, Iowa
Yale, Iowa
Benton, Kentucky
Ewing, Kentucky
Hebron, Kentucky
Melbourne, Kentucky
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Hammond, Louisiana
Cambridge, Maryland
Halifax, Massachusetts
Westborough, Massachusetts
Westford, Massachusetts
Dearborn Heights, Michigan
Albertville, Minnesota
Golden, Mississippi
Maben, Mississippi
Marietta, Mississippi
Tupelo, Mississippi
Cole Camp, Missouri
Conway, Missouri
Jackson, Missouri
Joplin, Missouri
Saint Louis, Missouri
Saint Robert, Missouri
Springfield, Missouri
Littleton, New Hampshire
Beachwood, New Jersey
Hainesport, New Jersey
Millville, New Jersey
Piscataway, New Jersey
Woodstown, New Jersey
Albuquerque, New Mexico
Himrod, New York
Lake Grove, New York
New City, New York
Yonkers, New York
Concord, North Carolina
Elizabeth City, North Carolina
Raleigh, North Carolina
Belfield, North Dakota
Medora, North Dakota
Bucyrus, Ohio
Carrollton, Ohio
Dayton, Ohio
Lancaster, Ohio
Lebanon, Ohio
North Ridgeville, Ohio
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Bend, Oregon
Gold Hill, Oregon
Portland, Oregon
Salem, Oregon
Lewisburg, Pennsylvania
Meshoppen, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Whitehall, Pennsylvania
West Kingston, Rhode Island
Summerville, South Carolina
Clarksville, Tennessee
Memphis, Tennessee
Morristown, Tennessee
Summertown, Tennessee
Abilene, Texas
Austin, Texas
Buda, Texas
Fort Worth, Texas (2 reports)
Houston, Texas
Magnolia, Texas
Midland, Texas
Needville, Texas
Spring, Texas
Salt Lake City, Utah
Springville, Utah
Essex Junction, Vermont
Ashburn, Virginia
Barboursville, Virginia
Hurt, Virginia
Petersburg, Virginia
Roanoke, Virginia
Walkerton, Virginia
Lakewood, Washington
Seattle, Washington
Shelton, Washington
Stanwood, Washington
Tacoma, Washington
Vancouver, Washington
Gauley Bridge, West Virginia
West Hamlin, West Virginia
Appleton, Wisconsin
Kenosha, Wisconsin
Laramie, Wyoming
Sheridan, Wyoming

By dellrose
Thumbnail #1 of American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by dellrose

By plantladylin

Thumbnail #2 of American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by plantladylin

By Grasmussen

Thumbnail #3 of American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by Grasmussen

By plantladylin

Thumbnail #4 of American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by plantladylin

By plantladylin

Thumbnail #5 of American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by plantladylin

By threegardeners

Thumbnail #6 of American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by threegardeners

By threegardeners

Thumbnail #7 of American Robin (Turdus migratorius) by threegardeners

There are a total of 69 photos.
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Member Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive dahlianut On Dec 29, 2008, dahlianut from Calgary, AB
(Zone 3a) wrote:

Robins nest and summer in my neighbourhood. One pair nests each year on my porch light. They are not competative for nesting material, food or bathing. It is not uncommon to see 6 or more working in the same bed. Some years there is a second nesting in late July/early August.

Neutral adesgarden On Dec 31, 2008, adesgarden from Laramie, WY wrote:

I observed an American robin in Longmont, CO (zone 5) yesterday on December 30th. I was surprised because all the other robins have migrated. This area has had sub-zero temps and snow in December, even though now the temps have fluctuated up to 60 or so. Why would this bird stay in Colorado when the rest of the robins have migrated to warmer areas? How does it survive?

Neutral Grasmussen On Jan 8, 2009, Grasmussen from Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4a) wrote:

Surprising as it may seem, not all Robins migrate south in the winter. Normally, a few Robins over winter here in Anchorage, Alaska. They can survive temperatures lower than 20 below zero Fahrenheit.

Positive plantladylin On Jan 24, 2010, plantladylin from South Daytona, FL
(Zone 9b) wrote:

We see large flocks of the American Robin in our area usually in the winter months, especially mid January through February. They love the berries of the Brazilian Pepper, Dahoon Holly, Cabbage Palm, and there are always many of them feeding on the berries of the Sugarberry trees.

Positive Junipertrail On Feb 3, 2010, Junipertrail from Raleigh, NC wrote:

I was told that robins are ground feeders and won't eat at feeders. I have 2 that eat peanuts and a peanut, suet mixture I make and spread on a board and bread or leftover pieces of nut or fruit breads that I break up, they don't seem to want anything else but are here many times a day. Right after we had snow I had 5. I had one that stayed all winter. It's a pleasure to have them around.

Positive marylee325 On Feb 22, 2010, marylee325 from Richmond, RI wrote:

I saw my first Robin of the season today. Very happy that spring is not far behind.

Positive tootsieroll On Feb 23, 2010, tootsieroll from West Hamlin, WV wrote:

My husband seen three or four Robins in our front yard today,(2/22/2010). This always gets our hopes up for spring to be getting here soon.

Positive SaberLily On Jun 12, 2010, SaberLily from Winchester, VA
(Zone 7a) wrote:

As plentiful as these birds are in our area (they are here all year around) I never get tired of seeing them and I try to encourage them as much as possible. They are surprisingly tolerant of other birds, so I don't have to decide between them and the field sparrows, bluebirds, and juncos that frequent the feeder.

Fortunately, they seem to find my garden very hospitable (plenty of the insects they eat -- I even saw one snatch a wasp out of the air) and I see several in a single day.

Positive irishgramma On Nov 29, 2010, irishgramma from Peace River
Canada wrote:

happy to read comments about the robin's ability to deal with winter conditions - we had many robins in the area until very late in November which is quite unusual for our area.

Neutral gnana On Jan 1, 2011, gnana from Barboursville, VA wrote:

We have large flocks of Robins in central VA that have not migrated this year. Usually it is late Feb. or March when the first few appear. They are feeding on the large trees that have berries, but I wonder what they will eat when the ground remains frozen and the berries are all gone. A few have come to the ground around the feeders, but don't linger.

Neutral caobr549 On Jan 23, 2012, caobr549 from Tupelo, MS wrote:

Where did all the Robins come from? There's been a flock consisting of at least 25-30 in my backyard and around the neighboorhood for the last week. I have a lot of flower beds with mulch and they love digging in that for worms, except they made havoc of my moss bed. I love watching them in the bird bath, they love water! Is it normal for them to be here this time of year? Although I've never had Flowering Quince and Yellow Bells blooming this time of year before either.

Positive Clary On Apr 26, 2012, Clary from Lewisburg, PA
(Zone 6b) wrote:

I am always happy to have robins in my garden. They enjoy the baths like the other birds do and are fond of the berries on my fruiting trees. They tend to nest in exactly the same location year after year. Robins are beautiful and sociable, but I love most of all their bold cheerful singing, which is so melodious and original!

Positive HeidiKHandmade On Mar 4, 2013, HeidiKHandmade from Vancouver, WA wrote:

A sure sign of imminent spring, flocks of these birds started appearing in my neighborhood in February this year! Some like to sit in the top of my blue spruce tree and twitter happily. I always enjoy their happy song.

Neutral seaotter301 On May 26, 2013, seaotter301 from Elmhurst, IL
(Zone 5a) wrote:

Has anyone else experienced an American Robin frequenting their feeder? I think this poor bird is confused and I have seen him eat various types of seeds daily. Then, yesterday, I saw him/her take seeds away - presumably to the nest!

Maybe I'm confused, but I always thought that robins ate worms and bugs?

Positive LiciaM On Jun 10, 2013, LiciaM from Chicago, IL wrote:

This must be my year for Robins. A few weeks ago I was working in the dirt in my side yard and noticed a beat up looking robin. It kept sticking around. I figured it wanted to poke around in the moist dirt I was digging in. I threw him a worm. He kept with me the rest of the morning and this healthy robin kept chasing him. Finally the beat up robin came closer to me when the healthy robin approached. Eventually I had to go to work. When I came home that evening it was still light out, the robin was sitting there as if waiting for me. I changed clothes and came back out to work in the garden and soon he was right next to me. I threw him more worms and the mean bird was there too. It got dark and I figured out in the meantime this little guy couldn't fly. I caught him and called the collision bird monitors. They came the next day to take him to the bird sanctuary where they help birds get well. Now this week another robin has befriended me and I throw him grubs I find while working the dirt. He flies well and chirps loudly if I don't feed him grubs. He is picky and will not eat earthworms unless I am having a hard time finding grubs. This bird gets very close. This whole robin thing is very entertaining to me as I work in the garden. I wouldn't be surprised if this bird comes and sits on my shoulder one day.


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