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Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos)

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Order: Passeriformes
Family: Turdidae
Genus: Turdus
Species: philomelos

Profile:

1 positive
No neutrals
No negatives

Regional...

This bird has been reportedly found in the following regions:

Halifax, Massachusetts

By kniphofia
Thumbnail #1 of Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos) by kniphofia

By wallaby1

Thumbnail #2 of Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos) by wallaby1

By wallaby1

Thumbnail #3 of Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos) by wallaby1

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By wallaby1

Thumbnail #6 of Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos) by wallaby1

By wallaby1

Thumbnail #7 of Song Thrush (Turdus philomelos) by wallaby1

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Member Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive RosinaBloom On Dec 13, 2012, RosinaBloom from Waihi
New Zealand wrote:

First introduced in the 1860's, the Song Thrush is now one of our most common New Zealand birds. It lives in gardens, orchards, hedgerows, scrubland and native forest. It defends its territory from April onwards, usually by threat displays, singing and occasionally by vigorous fighting. The female can take up to 13 days to build the deep-cupped nest in a shrub, tree or hedge often only one to five metres off the ground. After three or four blue eggs (with a few small black spots) are laid, the female alone incubates them for about 12 to 13 days. Both parents feed the young until they leave the nest about 14 days after hatching. Up to three successful broods can be raised in a season. The Song Thrush feeds on earthworms and snails, a variety of insects, and to a lesser degree on wild and cultivated fruits. It mostly takes its food from the ground. When hunting worms it hops or runs forward a metre or so, cocks its head as if to listen, then remains motionless. A worm is swiftly seized and tugged from the ground. When they are collecting food for their young they often hold several worms in their beaks while continuing to search for more. They will often be seen to knock a snail against a stone to break the shell to get the juicy morsel. It is always a joy to hear their repertoire of song in the morning and in the evening when perched on high. The sexes are alike with breasts that are heavily marked with elongated brownish black spots.


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