Photo by Melody

Boat-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus major)

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Order: Passeriformes
Family: Icteridae
Genus: Quiscalus
Species: major (MAY-jor) (Info)

Profile:

1 positive
No neutrals
No negatives

Regional...

This bird has been reportedly found in the following regions:

Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Lutz, Florida
Halifax, Massachusetts
Lubbock, Texas

By pelletory
Thumbnail #1 of Boat-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus major) by pelletory

By pelletory

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By Floridian

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By Adrastia217

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By Adrastia217

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By Adrastia217

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By Adrastia217

Thumbnail #7 of Boat-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus major) by Adrastia217

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Member Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive maccionoadha On Apr 16, 2015, maccionoadha from Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a) wrote:

The adult male has black plumage, which in good light, has a bluish sheen on the head, changing to greenish on the body. The adult female has reddish brown plumage, darker on wings and tail. Her tail is somewhat shorter than in the male. The juveniles look like the adult female, but their color is duller.

The length of the Males is 16-17" (41-43 cm) and the Females are 12-13" (30-33 cm).

They are a locally common resident in coastal wetlands; mostly sedentary, but harsh winter weather does force some northern birds to move south. Within viewing range, their distinctive tails are easy to see. They range from Florida, Texas, Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, and Northeast

Their song is a mixture of strange dry rattles, hisses, and grating chatters. Their call is a soft tchak.

They are a distinctive, usually coastal bird. They are easy to recognize by male's long, keel-shaped tail and
sociable behavior. It feeds mainly on the ground, probing for food with its pointed bill, but it does take advantage of bird feeders. They eye is pale yellow in Atlantic coast birds, but brownish in Florida and Gulf coast birds. Sexes are different with the male being noticeably larger than female.


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