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Yellow-nosed Albatross (Thalassarche chlororhynchos)

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Order: Procellariiformes
Family: Diomedeidae
Genus: Thalassarche
Species: chlororhynchos

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Member Notes:

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Neutral rntx22 On Dec 30, 2008, rntx22 from Houston, TX
(Zone 9a) wrote:

From wikipedia:
Pelagic. This small, slender albatross glides and banks like a shearwater. Once considered conspecific with the Indian Yellow-nosed Albatross and known as the Yellow-nosed Albatross.

Large seabird. Black and white with a grey head and large eye patch. Can be told from the Indian Yellow-nosed by its darker head. Relative to other mollymawks it can be distinguished by its smaller size (the wings being particularly narrow) and the thin black edging to the underwing. Grey-headed Albatross has a similar grey head but more extensive and less well defined black markings around the edge of the underwing. Salvin's Albatross also has a grey head but has much broader wings, a pale bill and even more narrow black border's to the underwing.

Nest on islands in the mid-Atlantic, including Tristan da Cunha, Gough Island and surrounding islands. Like all albatrosses they are colonial, but unusually they will build their nests in scrub or amongst Blechnum tree ferns. Like all mollymawks they build pedestal nests of mud and other handy materials to lay their one egg in.

Found in the Southern Hemisphere in Atlantic and Indian Oceans. At sea they range across the south Atlantic from South America to Africa, feeding on squid, fish and crustacea. Accidental off the Atlantic and Gulf coasts.

Length 71-81 cm Wingspan 200-256 cm
Abundance: Rare/Endangered


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