Photo by Melody

Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica)

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Order: Charadriiformes
Family: Scolopacidae
Genus: Limosa
Species: lapponica

Profile:

2 positives
No neutrals
No negatives

By RosinaBloom
Thumbnail #1 of Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by RosinaBloom

By RosinaBloom

Thumbnail #2 of Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by RosinaBloom

By RosinaBloom

Thumbnail #3 of Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by RosinaBloom

By RosinaBloom

Thumbnail #4 of Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by RosinaBloom

By Resin

Thumbnail #5 of Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by Resin

By Resin

Thumbnail #6 of Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by Resin

By RosinaBloom

Thumbnail #7 of Bar-tailed Godwit (Limosa lapponica) by RosinaBloom

There are a total of 15 photos.
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Member Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Positive Resin On Dec 31, 2008, Resin from Northumberland
United Kingdom
(Zone 9a) wrote:

Breeding in the high Arctic and wintering on coasts throughout the Old World, this species holds the record for long-distance migration, with a radio-tagged bird flying non-stop 11,680 kilometres from Alaska to New Zealand.

Positive RosinaBloom On Mar 6, 2013, RosinaBloom from Waihi
New Zealand wrote:

Yesterday was a special experience observing the mild behaviour and habits of this migrating bird assembling at Kaiawa on the Firth of Thames, while it rests up ready to take on the long migration north. In non-breeding plumage the sexes are alike, but the female is markedly bigger than the male, and her slightly upcurved beak which is flesh pink on basal and half grading to blackish at the tip, is twice as long as her head. The male's beak is one and a half times the size of his head. In breeding plumage the male's head, neck and underparts are reddish chestnut. The breeding plumage of the female is much paler with wide, individual variation. It breeds in northeastern Siberia, west central and northern Alaska, and winters in south China, Taiwan, the Philippines, Borneo, New Guinea and Australia. These Godwits start to arrive in New Zealand in late September, simultaneously at many localities, suggesting that most birds return directly to traditional wintering grounds. The most favoured localities seem to be Kaipara, Manukau, the Firth of Thames and Fairwell Spit. Their departure is mainly in the latter part of March. Birds seen after March are mainly non-breeders, few of them showing reddened plumage. They feed on crustaceans, molluscs or worms probing deeply into intertidal mud flats or wet sand. They roost on sandbanks, shellbanks and spits that are surrounded by water at high tide.

Timer: 14.01 jiffies (0.14005589485168).


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