Fouquieria
Fouquieria purpusii

Family: Fouquieriaceae
Genus: Fouquieria (foo-KWEER-ree-uh) (Info)
Species: purpusii (pur-PUSS-ee-eye) (Info)
Synonym:Fouquieria purpusianus
Synonym:Fouquieria purpusiorum

Category:

Trees

Height:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Bronze-Green

Other details:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Apache Junction, Arizona

Chandler, Arizona

Phoenix, Arizona

Bostonia, California

Casa De Oro-mount Helix, California

Los Angeles, California

Santa Barbara, California

Spring Valley, California

Thousand Oaks, California

Tulare, California

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Nov 15, 2012, mitsukurina from Los Angeles, CA wrote:

Lovely plant; needs free root run to grow well; it grows in summer without issue in Santa Barbara, CA.

Positive

On Aug 25, 2007, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Slow but incredibly beautiful Fouquieria... very popular plant in collectors collections- grows very upright normally eventually developing an interesting partly green, partly bark-covered fat trunk. Leaves are narrow and create a bristly look to the branches- sort of like a pine tree, though there are long, sharp spines hidden in these branches. New growth often consists of naked twig-like reddish woody material, new spines and only later to be covered with leaves. In some climates this is deciduous, while in others it is not. I have found it a pretty easy plant to grow outdoors, but very slow- best to buy it as large as you can afford it. Likes full sun and tolerates mod to no water.