Plumeria
Plumeria rubra 'Teresa Wilder'

Family: Apocynaceae (a-pos-ih-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Plumeria (ploo-MEER-ee-a) (Info)
Species: rubra (ROO-bruh) (Info)
Cultivar: Teresa Wilder
» View all varieties of Plumeria

Category:

Trees

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pink

Orange

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Mid Fall

Late Fall/Early Winter

Foliage:

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Veined

Leathery-Textured

Other details:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Flowers are fragrant

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Flowers are good for cutting

Suitable for growing in containers

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

From softwood cuttings

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

Allow cut surface to callous over before planting

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; germinate in a damp paper towel

By grafting

By air layering

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Seed does not store well; sow as soon as possible

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Phoenix, Arizona

Cabot, Arkansas

Carlsbad, California

Encinitas, California

Hudson, Florida

Islamorada, Florida

Naples, Florida

Satellite Beach, Florida

Haiku, Hawaii

Hammond, Louisiana

Kenner, Louisiana

Austin, Texas

Dallas, Texas

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Gardeners' Notes:

3
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 2, 2012, cosmosis from Peoria, IL wrote:

I have been tending to a plumeria that I started from seed three years ago. It summers outdoors and winters near a sunny window. It has not nor shows any indication that it will branch or produce flowers. I keep hoping, though.

Positive

On Jul 2, 2012, bikerlady from Summerfield, FL wrote:

I had this plant (tree) in my garden in Fort Lauderdale and absolutely LOVED it. It dropped its leaves in the winter (all of three months) but then filled out and bloomed the rest of the year. I called it a "frangipani." As for propagation, all I'd do is snap off a small branch and stick it in the ground. This plant was a great grower with the most beautiful, fragrant blooms. When I sold that house the plant was about ten feet tall, about five years old. Enjoy!

Positive

On Jul 2, 2012, dj63010 from Islamorada, FL wrote:

The locals call this family of plants "Frangy Pangy's" Not sure where this came from but they are among my favorite plants. Oh, and the fragrance is out of this world, I guess that's why it's the flower of choice for lay's in Hawaii. No southern garden should be without at least one of these plants.