Bigflower Pawpaw or Scrub Pawpaw
Asimina obovata

Family: Annonaceae
Genus: Asimina (a-SEE-mee-nuh) (Info)
Species: obovata (ob-oh-VAY-tuh) (Info)

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Shrubs

Trees

Height:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Leathery-Textured

Other details:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

By air layering

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Deltona, Florida

Keystone Heights, Florida

Merritt Island, Florida

Orlando, Florida

East Greenville, Pennsylvania

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jun 28, 2005, NativePlantFan9 from Boca Raton, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

A. obovata is native to dry sandy areas, scrub, sandhills, dry sandy pinelands and similar dry or xeric sites throughout most or nearly all of central Florida as far north as Clay County and as far south as Glades County.

The flowers are good for attracting insects and wildlife. It is a good native plant for xeriscaping, a drought-tolerant landscape or wildlife/native plant garden.

Positive

On Jun 25, 2005, MotherNature4 from Bartow, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

Endemic to the peninsula of Florida, the Scrub Pawpaw is a small tree that looks almost like a dogwood in the landscape. The large white petals have maroon centers.
The edible fruits remind one of tiny bananas 3 to 4 inches long. The fruit matures in early summer.
Though difficult, it is certainly worthy of propagation.