Red Root
Lachnanthes caroliana

Family: Haemodoraceae
Genus: Lachnanthes (lak-NAN-thees) (Info)
Species: caroliana

Category:

Perennials

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Cream/Tan

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Very high moisture needs; suitable for bogs and water gardens

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Bartow, Florida

Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Sebastian, Florida

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Nov 12, 2006, beckygardener from (Becky) in Sebastian, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

Nice pond plant. Well-behaved. Does seem to die back in late Fall/Winter months here in Florida. Roots do spread, so will need to repot this plant in a bigger pot for next season.

Neutral

On Jul 21, 2005, MotherNature4 from Bartow, FL (Zone 9a) wrote:

This is the only member of the bloodwort family that is native to the United States. It is a common weed found in bogs, swamps and wetlands throughout Florida, then as far north as Nova Scotia, where it is considered an endangered species.

It looks like a ragged iris, but if pulled up one can easily see the red sap in stems & roots.

The flowers are covered with what appears to be wool, and swallowtail butterflies seem to love the nectar.

It has been used both medicinally and as dye by native Americans and early settlers.