Ground Cherry
Physalis peruviana 'Aunt Molly'

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Physalis (fy-SAL-is) (Info)
Species: peruviana (per-u-vee-AN-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Aunt Molly

Category:

Annuals

Vegetables

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Velvet/Fuzzy-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow unblemished fruit to ripen; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Brodhead, Kentucky

Amarillo, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On May 10, 2012, JeremiahT from Brodhead, KY wrote:

This is a hardy, highly productive plant with small, golden fruits enclosed in papery calyxes. Flavor of ripe fruit is unusual, difficult to describe---though it is very sweet, with notes of pineapple and tomato.

I grew six plants last year---started indoors 6-7 weeks before the last frost date, in the manner of tomatoes---and had an abundance of fruit for fresh snacking and cooking. The plants received no special treatment---just a good mulching with rotted leaves, a bit of watering during dry spells, and a couple of foliar feedings with a fish emulsion/kelp extract solution. No disease or insect problems, though a couple of plants did split at the main stem---apparently a result of rapid growth, high water content and sprawling habit. Bound up splits with twine and st... read more

Neutral

On Sep 2, 2005, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

Small, golden fruits with papery husks (like tomatillos) and a sweet-tart, slightly citrus flavor, ripen a golden-orange and store up to 3 months in their husks. Great in hot desserts, even over ice cream. Harvest the ripe ones straight off the ground and graze in the garden. Originally from Poland." (70 day)