Tabebuia
Tabebuia umbellata

Family: Bignoniaceae (big-no-nih-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Tabebuia (ta-bee-BEW-ee-uh) (Info)
Species: umbellata (um-bell-AY-tuh) (Info)

Category:

Trees

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Height:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Gainesville, Florida

Orlando, Florida

Rockledge, Florida

Sanford, Florida

Tampa, Florida

Austin, Texas

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Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Apr 28, 2008, tropicaldude from Orlando, FL wrote:

T. Umbellata is the most cold hardy of the 3 yellow-flowering Tabebuias planted in Florida. It's possibly the more spectacular at peak bloom with deep yellow flowers (brighter than the pictures show) totally covering the branches. It's also the latest of the 3 to bloom, from late March into April. The cycle is relatively short and after seeing trees in full bloom I've come back 10 days later and found them completely bare. Even when not in flower it's handsome with horizontal branches (what identifies this species at first glance) and symmetrical, open form. Very common tree in Orlando neighborhoods, less so in Southern Florida where T. Aurea is the one usually planted.