Cycad
Encephalartos gratus

Family: Zamiaceae
Genus: Encephalartos (en-sef-uh-LAR-tos) (Info)
Species: gratus (GRAH-tus) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Cycads

Height:

8-10 ft. (2.4-3 m)

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

Spacing:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

12-15 ft. (3.6-4.7 m)

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

Seed is poisonous if ingested

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Leathery-Textured

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Suitable for growing in containers

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; germinate in vitro in gelatin, agar or other medium

Seed Collecting:

Remove fleshy coating on seeds before storing

Properly cleaned, seed can be successfully stored

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Marino, California

Simi Valley, California

Tulare, California

Visalia, California

Brandon, Florida

Fort Myers, Florida

Anahola, Hawaii

Cayce, South Carolina

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Sep 21, 2005, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This is one of the more commonly grown and larger cycads available. It has relatively user-friendly leaves with lancelote spineless leaflets (sometimes very small spines along edges) of a bright, limey green. The leaves can be quite long and this plant will take up a large amount of room in your yard. It is one of the Encephalartos that is a bit happier NOT getting blazing hot sun all day long, and does best in moist, semi-shady yards. I have seen a monster of a plant in Fairchild (Miami), so it obviously loves that hot, humid climate.