Plains Cottonwood
Populus deltoides subsp. occidentalis

Family: Salicaceae (sal-i-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Populus (POP-yoo-lus) (Info)
Species: deltoides subsp. occidentalis

Category:

Trees

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Spacing:

over 40 ft. (12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Fuchsia (Red-Purple)

Chartreuse (Yellow-Green)

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Shiny/Glossy-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From hardwood cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Sep 26, 2005, darylmitchell from Saskatoon, SK (Zone 3a) wrote:

The plains cottonwood is a smaller subspecies of the eastern cottonwood, populus deltoides. The subspecies is also known as "sargentii" or "monilifera". Their native range is in western North America, from Texas in the south to Saskatchewan and Alberta in the north. They are most common along lakes and riverbanks.

These are fast-growing, very tall but short-lived trees. They have extensive, invasive root systems and weak wood that breaks easily in storms. This makes them unsuitable for an urban landscape except on large properties or parks. They are useful in rural settings as shelterbelts.