Lindheimer Hackberry
Celtis lindheimeri

Family: Ulmaceae (ulm-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Celtis (SEL-tis) (Info)
Species: lindheimeri (lind-HY-mer-ee) (Info)

Category:

Edible Fruits and Nuts

Trees

Foliage Color:

Silver/Gray

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

Spacing:

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

30-40 ft. (9-12 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Velvet/Fuzzy-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

8.6 to 9.0 (strongly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Self-sows freely; deadhead if you do not want volunteer seedlings next season

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Mcallen, Texas

Red Oak, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 25, 2013, BajaBlue from Rancho Santa Rita, TX (Zone 8a) wrote:

Native to Texas & U.S.

Bloom Time: Mar-May. Bloom Notes: Inflorescences erect dense
clusters, 2-9-flowered, at base of leaves.

Celtis lindheimeri is a larval host and/or nectar source for: Band-celled Sister(Adelpha fessonia) . This species is named after Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer (1801-1879) who is often called the Father of Texas Botany because of his work as the first permanent-resident plant collector in Texas. In 1834 Lindheimer immigrated to the United States as a political refugee. He spent from 1843-1852 collecting specimens in Texas. In 1844 he settled in New Braunfels, Texas, and was granted land on the banks of the Comal River, where he continued his plant collecting and attempted to establish a botanical garden.

He shared... read more