Drumsticks, Rose Cone Flower
Isopogon formosus

Family: Proteaceae (pro-tee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Isopogon (eye-soh-POH-gon) (Info)
Species: formosus (for-MOH-sus) (Info)
View this plant in a garden

Category:

Shrubs

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pink

Magenta (Pink-Purple)

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Evergreen

Other details:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Flowers are good for cutting

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From woody stem cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Boulder Creek, California

Carlsbad, California

Dublin, California

San Leandro, California

Vista, California

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 30, 2014, Susi_So_Callif from Vista, CA (Zone 10a) wrote:

Very attractive unusual flowers appear in spring, and the central cones remain on the plant for a year or more. Very low water in coastal So. California, and pretty much maintenance free, too.

Neutral

On Nov 15, 2007, macybee from Deer Park, TX (Zone 9a) wrote:

Botanica Encyclopedia
ISOPOGON - Drumsticks
With around 30 species of evergreen shrubs from Australia, this genus is admired for its attractive light green foliage which, though frequently dissected and ferny in apppearance, is hard and prickly - like that of many Australian shrubs - and their globular heads of fragrant white, cream or pink flowers borne in spring or summer. Plants of quiet charm, they are somewhat overshadowed by their more spectacular relatives the grevilleas and banksias, and even in their native land are not widely grown. The flowers are followed by woody, knob-like fruiting heads resembling small pine cones or drumsticks - hence the common name. These may persist on the bare, straight stems after both flowers and leaves have died.
CULTIVATION:
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