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Dwarf Horsetail, Dwarf Scouring Rush, Sedge Horsetail
Equisetum scirpoides

Family: Equisetaceae
Genus: Equisetum (ek-wis-SEE-tum) (Info)
Species: scirpoides (skir-POI-deez) (Info)
Synonym:Hippochaete scirpoides

Category:

Perennials

Ponds and Aquatics

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

3-6 in. (7-15 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 3a: to -39.9 C (-40 F)

USDA Zone 3b: to -37.2 C (-35 F)

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Bloom Color:

Inconspicuous/none

Bloom Time:

N/A

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Requires consistently moist soil; do not let dry out between waterings

Very high moisture needs; suitable for bogs and water gardens

This plant may be considered a protected species; check before digging or gathering seeds

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

Seed Collecting:

N/A: plant does not set seed, flowers are sterile, or plants will not come true from seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Jose, California

Oldsmar, Florida

Venus, Florida

Cherry Valley, Illinois

Winnetka, Illinois

Grand Haven, Michigan

Byhalia, Mississippi

Lincoln, Nebraska

Charlotte, North Carolina

Arlington, Tennessee

Austin, Texas

Fort Worth, Texas

Seattle, Washington

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Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Apr 13, 2009, plantaholic186 from Winnetka, IL wrote:

NEVER plant this outside of a non-draining container. I made the mistake of planting a few, and had to rip out an entire bed to try to get rid of it. In one year, it had spread at least 5' in every direction.
The roots are tiny, fibrous rhizomes that are impossible to pull out completely, so controlling it is impossible.
It's a pretty plant, and a great looking alternative to grass, but I'm really surprised that it is sold in the trade, because of its invasiveness.
BEWARE.

Neutral

On Mar 25, 2007, Cretaceous from El Sobrante, CA (Zone 9b) wrote:

Native to Canada, and the northern USA (Alaska, Connecticut, Idaho, Iowa, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming).

Considered an endangered species in the states of Connecticut and Illinois. Sometimes seen in nurseries locally.