Anise Magnolia, Japanese Willow-Leaf Magnolia
Magnolia salicifolia

Family: Magnoliaceae
Genus: Magnolia (mag-NO-lee-a) (Info)
Species: salicifolia (sal-iss-ih-FOH-lee-uh) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Shrubs

Trees

Height:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

20-30 ft. (6-9 m)

Spacing:

15-20 ft. (4.7-6 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pale Pink

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

San Francisco, California

Poplar Grove, Illinois

Lexington, Kentucky

Roslindale, Massachusetts

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Mar 11, 2014, coriaceous from ROSLINDALE, MA wrote:

The best of the spring-blooming magnolias, in my opinion, and unjustly neglected in our gardens and landscapes.

The white spring flowers resemble those of the star magnolia, and like them they bloom profusely on leafless branches. But they bloom about two weeks later, which means the display is much less often spoiled by an untimely frost. The fragrance is sweet and lacks the heavy foetid overtones most magnolias have.

The leaves are sweetly fragrant when crushed. To my nose, they smell like spicebush, or sassafras, or myrtle, or bay laurel, or of the flowers produced by the same tree. I don't smell anything like anise, but some apparently do.

Unlike most magnolias, the leaves turn a good yellow in the fall.

This species occurs in... read more

Neutral

On Mar 13, 2006, Malus2006 from Coon Rapids, MN (Zone 4a) wrote:

I saw a small to medium sized tree on the Minnesota Arboretum site. Hadn't seen it in bloom. Have lots of small leaves at least one to two inches long that smell strongly like anise. I wonder why it is rare as it was thriving at the site and is not necessary focus on flowers.