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Oriental Paper Bush 'Winter Gold'

Edgeworthia chrysantha

Family: Thymelaeaceae
Genus: Edgeworthia (edj-WOR-thee-uh) (Info)
Species: chrysantha (kris-ANTH-uh) (Info)
Cultivar: Winter Gold
Synonym:Edgeworthia papyrifera
Synonym:Edgeworthia tomentosa



Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Flowers are fragrant

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)


6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)


USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun


Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Winter/Early Spring



Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Pelham, Alabama

Waverly, Alabama

Atlanta, Georgia

Lilburn, Georgia

Porterdale, Georgia

Tucker, Georgia

Davidson, North Carolina

Raleigh, North Carolina

Portland, Oregon (2 reports)

Salem, Oregon

Saunderstown, Rhode Island

North Augusta, South Carolina

South Boston, Virginia

Seattle, Washington

show all

Gardeners' Notes:


On Feb 7, 2011, LeeLeeRob from Tucker, GA wrote:

This is amongst my favorite plants and I can't imagine a winter without it. It blooms with closed buds all winter long, opening up in February with delicious fragrance. It can get a tad droopy in the worst heat of summer sometimes, but it always recovers. The foliage is dark and attractive. The blooms are drop dead gorgeous above the snow. I like to keep it to a single stem and vase shaped, but can't bear to cut off the ground shoots until the blooms are gone. I've managed to root a couple just by pruning them off and sticking them in the ground nearby.


On Feb 20, 2010, sweetpea48 from Mcdonough, GA (Zone 7b) wrote:

This is the first time my Edgeworthia has bloomed, and it is pretty satisfying so far. I erroneously put it in full sun last spring when I planted it, and it really should have been in part shade, at least. I watered and watered it and managed to keep it alive until all of a sudden it stopped needing so much (it wilts really quickly when thirsty). Apparently it's roots got deep enough to manage without me. I have a true genius for badly siting plants, and I'm glad this one survived my affliction.

The flowerheads formed last summer, and are pretty showy throughout the winter by themselves on the bare branches. They appear at the tip of each branch, where they seem to glow, particularly at dusk. Very, very nice.

And they smell divine!