Okra
Abelmoschus esculentus 'Alabama Red'

Family: Malvaceae (mal-VAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Abelmoschus (a-bel-MOS-kus) (Info)
Species: esculentus (es-kew-LEN-tus) (Info)
Cultivar: Alabama Red
Synonym:Hibiscus esculentus

Category:

Annuals

Vegetables

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

15-18 in. (38-45 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Jonesville, South Carolina

Old Hickory, Tennessee

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
2
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Neutral

On Dec 16, 2012, lssfishhunter from Jonesville, SC (Zone 7b) wrote:

They are beautiful plants. The pods are thick and stocky and must be picked young before they get tough. They have spines on the pods that will stick you and remain in your fingers, on occasion, so use caution when handling raw and picking! The pods are conversation starters because of their shape and color (red and green combinations). The foliage was scarce at the end of the growing season compared to other varieties. Overall, they cook up nicely when young; bear decently; and grows with minimal care. However, due to the spines, I will not grow again.

Positive

On Jun 30, 2007, kbartoy from Old Hickory, TN wrote:

This is a beautiful plant that is growing in a poor soil area of our garden and thriving. I love the red stalk.

Neutral

On Dec 5, 2005, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

A 70 day variety, this heirloom from Alabama that has fat, red pods.