Allthorn
Koeberlinia spinosa

Family: Koeberliniaceae
Genus: Koeberlinia (ko-ber-LIN-ee-a) (Info)
Species: spinosa (spy-NO-suh) (Info)

Category:

Perennials

Shrubs

Cactus and Succulents

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

24-36 in. (60-90 cm)

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)

Spacing:

6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Plant has spines or sharp edges; use extreme caution when handling

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Bloom Time:

Late Summer/Early Fall

Foliage:

Deciduous

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

Unknown - Tell us

Seed Collecting:

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed; clean and dry seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Gila Bend, Arizona

Tucson, Arizona

San Marino, California

Las Cruces, New Mexico

Weslaco, Texas

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 9, 2008, DJ_Radikal from Weslaco, TX wrote:

One way to propagate successfully is to immerse the seed in a cup of distilled white vinegar for 24 hours then plant normally in soil and add a few teaspoons of vinegar mixed with water and pour into soil.

Positive

On Mar 14, 2007, AZgrower from Tucson, AZ wrote:

This is a native plant growing on my property along the West Branch of the Santa Cruz River in AZ among a Mesquite bosque. It will bloom in late summer after the onset of monsoon season. Attracts Wasps, Pepsid wasps, native bees, butterflies like crazy. Wonderful and drought tolerant. Fruit relished by the birds in late August. Seed collected in mid September. I am trying to propagate from seed but need ideas. This is a great shrub!

Neutral

On Dec 24, 2005, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

Native Texas plant that spends most of the year leafless- just a twisted shrub of long, green spines and stems. Leaves small and bried after periods of heavy rainfall. Small, insignificant flowers during warmer months. Dangerous plant to put near paths and an 'acquired' taste.