Eastern Bottle-brush Grass
Elymus hystrix

Family: Poaceae (poh-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Elymus (EL-ih-mus) (Info)
Species: hystrix (HIS-triks) (Info)
Synonym:Elymus hystrix var. hystrix
Synonym:Hystrix patula

Category:

Ornamental Grasses and Bamboo

Height:

36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

Spacing:

18-24 in. (45-60 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Cream/Tan

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Other details:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Provides winter interest

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Non-patented

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Lisle, Illinois

Wichita, Kansas

Minneapolis, Minnesota

Frenchtown, New Jersey

Newfield, New York

Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Robbinsville, North Carolina

Westfield, Wisconsin

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Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 2, 2015, Rickwebb from Downingtown, PA wrote:

This grass native to eastern North America is sold by native nurseries ,as Prairie Nursery in WI. It is a cool season plant that grows when temperatures are cool in spring and fall. Good for planting in part shade and along woodland edges and under deciduous trees that allow some light to enter.

Positive

On Apr 7, 2008, Malus2006 from Coon Rapids, MN (Zone 4a) wrote:

Semi evergreen during the winter - clump former that send up flowerheads that look like wheats - thrive in woodland shade. I have one plant and have seen it in the wild - in woodlands usually disturbed soils.