Mizuna, Rapini
Brassica rapa var. nipposinica

Family: Brassicaceae (brass-ih-KAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Brassica (BRAS-ee-ka) (Info)
Species: rapa var. nipposinica

Category:

Vegetables

Height:

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

12-18 in. (30-45 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

Not Applicable

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Time:

Unknown - Tell us

Foliage:

Unknown - Tell us

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Allow seedheads to dry on plants; remove and collect seeds

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Little Rock, Arkansas

Larkfield-wikiup, California

Westbrook, Connecticut

Dunnellon, Florida

Arlington, Virginia

Madison, Wisconsin

Milwaukee, Wisconsin

show all

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Jul 29, 2012, DonShirer from Westbrook, CT (Zone 6a) wrote:

Yes, it adds a nice crunch to salads. Don't plant too much, since as the previous post says, like the song about the cat, it keeps coming back. One plant fills one square foot.

Positive

On Oct 11, 2006, rebecca101 from Madison, WI (Zone 5a) wrote:

Mizuna is a great Asian green. Taste-wise it's so mild it's barely there, but it makes a nice addition to salads. I don't bother stir-frying with it because it doesn't add a lot of flavor. It's an amazing little plant though. One sowing usually takes me from early spring through frost. It's one of the first greens to be harvestable in spring, and you can keep cutting and it just keeps coming back. Great space-saver for a small garden. Forms a small fountain of feathery leaves.