Double Bird's Foot Trefoil
Lotus corniculatus 'Plenus'

Family: Papilionaceae (pa-pil-ee-uh-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Lotus (LO-tus) (Info)
Species: corniculatus (korn-ee-ku-LAY-tus) (Info)
Cultivar: Plenus

Category:

Groundcovers

Perennials

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 4a: to -34.4 C (-30 F)

USDA Zone 4b: to -31.6 C (-25 F)

USDA Zone 5a: to -28.8 C (-20 F)

USDA Zone 5b: to -26.1 C (-15 F)

USDA Zone 6a: to -23.3 C (-10 F)

USDA Zone 6b: to -20.5 C (-5 F)

USDA Zone 7a: to -17.7 C (0 F)

USDA Zone 7b: to -14.9 C (5 F)

USDA Zone 8a: to -12.2 C (10 F)

USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Herbaceous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing the rootball

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Scotia, California

Dearborn Heights, Michigan

Saint Cloud, Minnesota

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
1
neutral
1
negative
RatingContent
Negative

On Mar 15, 2008, distantkin from Saint Cloud, MN (Zone 4b) wrote:

Considered invasive by the MN DNR
From their website....
"Ecological Threat:
Birdsfoot trefoil forms dense mats choking and shading out most other vegetation.
It grows best in the Midwest and is most problematic in prairies and disturbed open areas, such as roadsides.
Prescribed burns increase seed germination making it troublesome in native prairies.
This European species has been introduced to the U.S. and Canada for livestock forage and erosion control along roadsides. It is still sold commercially. "

Neutral

On Feb 10, 2006, Gabrielle from (Zone 5a) wrote:

Dark green, tiny leaves form a dense tight mat. Completely covered by orange buds which open to double yellow flowers. Evergreen in warmer climates. Can withstand being walked on 3 or more times daily. Grows fast. Hardy to zone 5.