Necklace Pod

Sophora tomentosa var. occidentalis

Family: Papilionaceae (pa-pil-ee-uh-NAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Sophora (SOF-or-uh) (Info)
Species: tomentosa var. occidentalis



Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Foliage Color:


Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us


6-8 ft. (1.8-2.4 m)


36-48 in. (90-120 cm)

4-6 ft. (1.2-1.8 m)


USDA Zone 8b: to -9.4 C (15 F)

USDA Zone 9a: to -6.6 C (20 F)

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade


Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Bright Yellow

Bloom Time:

Blooms repeatedly



Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

Direct sow as soon as the ground can be worked

Seed Collecting:

Allow pods to dry on plant; break open to collect seeds


This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Cape Coral, Florida

Marathon, Florida

New Port Richey, Florida

North Port, Florida

Rockledge, Florida

Houston, Texas

Portland, Texas

show all

Gardeners' Notes:


On Jan 25, 2012, yakmon from Portland, TX (Zone 9b) wrote:

I collected a couple of seeds from a plant growing wild near the Southern Texas coast in the spring of 2009, I planted it, and as of January 2012, it is approximately 4 feet high and 4 feet wide. It bloomed for the first time in the fall of 2011. Requires very little care and no supplemental water once established. Very high cold tolerance too.


On Oct 17, 2011, Kaskazi from Homestead, FL wrote:

Sophora tomentosa var. occidentalis is not endemic to Texas, as stated. It is native from Texas southward into the tropical Americas and in the West Indies. It was first described from Jamaica, without locality. It is far more popular in the landscape in Florida than the native var. truncata, and is beginning to naturalize. Unfortunately, the non-native variety is often sold as a Florida native plant to an unwitting public.


On Sep 25, 2009, Florida_Keys from Big Pine Key, FL wrote:

occidentalis is hybridizing with our Florida native var truncata.

I hope that you will place a warning on planting this in Florida under the "other details".

Thank you for a great site!


On Jan 17, 2009, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

I have not grown this plant. Necklace Pod (Sophora tomentosa var. occidentalis) is an endemic Texas native plant. It grows natively along the South Texas coastline. At maturity, the leaves of this species are densely fuzzy which gives the foliage a fuzzy gray-green or silvery appearance which distinguishes it from Sophora tomentosa var. truncata whose leaves are are smooth and somewhat shiny at maturity.