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Potato
Solanum tuberosum 'Haida'

Family: Solanaceae (so-lan-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Solanum (so-LAN-num) (Info)
Species: tuberosum (too-ber-OH-sum) (Info)
Cultivar: Haida
» View all varieties of Potatoes

Category:

Annuals

Vegetables

Spacing:

9-12 in. (22-30 cm)

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Tuber Type:

Landrace - Heritage

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Days to Maturity:

101 to 110 days

Bloom Color:

White/Near White

Skin Color:

Buff

Skin Texture:

Smooth

Intermediate

Flesh Color:

White

Cream

Tuber Shape:

Round

Oval

Tuber Size:

Small

Medium

Typical Yield:

Unknown - Tell us

Texture:

Waxy (salad)

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Kenosha, Wisconsin

Gardeners' Notes:

1
positive
1
neutral
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Dec 3, 2008, curzio from Kenosha, WI wrote:

As you can see from the latest picture posted, this variety is an original landrace! You may easily figure how farmers in 1700 found this potato difficult to harvest and store - the knobs break easily and would rot in storage. Modern varieties are bred to prevent this original tuberous shape ... but have we lost nutritional values in the process?
I'm reporting "positively" on this cultivar - where someone else may see this report in a negative light. AgriCanada the Canadian Agency that equals USDA reports this cultivar as "with high levels of Glycoalkaloids" - very high levels and large quantities may constitute unhealthy, perhaps non-human edible (for animal comsuption only), on the other hand "high levels of Glycoalkaloids" are proven to be anti-cancerogenic and may turn out to... read more

Neutral

On Mar 2, 2006, Farmerdill from Augusta, GA (Zone 8a) wrote:

From Pacific Northwest Garden History: "Dating back more than 200 years to the late 1700s, two surviving potato varieties, the 'Haida' and the 'Ozette,' may have been carried here by the Voyages of Discovery. Crews from some of these vessels used spuds as a trade item and showed some of the native peoples along the coast how to grow them. Indians liked the potatoes well enough to keep them going, saving two varieties that are thought to be very old.

In the Queen Charlotte Islands, the Haidas grew potatoes that were about two or three inches long. The individual tubers vary in shape. Some are oblong. Others are egg shaped. Still others are nearly round. Many are knobby. They have medium brown skin, with a number of eyes. The flesh is waxy, and cream-colored. Dr. Nancy J. Tur... read more