Yellow Nutsedge
Cyperus esculentus var. leptostachyus

Family: Cyperaceae (sy-peer-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Cyperus (sy-PEER-us) (Info)
Species: esculentus var. leptostachyus

Category:

Groundcovers

Height:

Unknown - Tell us

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Pale Yellow

Brown/Bronze

Bloom Time:

Late Spring/Early Summer

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Deciduous

Herbaceous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

May be a noxious weed or invasive

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Bag seedheads to capture ripening seed

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Queen Creek, Arizona

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Gardeners' Notes:

0
positives
0
neutrals
2
negatives
RatingContent
Negative

On May 20, 2008, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

Yellow Nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus var. leptostachyus; synonym: Cyperus esculentus var. angustispicatus) is the most widespread nutsedge in North America. It is an introduced plant and has naturalized.

Negative

On May 30, 2007, efbiosis from Oakland, CA (Zone 10a) wrote:

A terrible uber-weed. Foliage dies back after frost, however the plant quickly re-establishes itself through persistent underground tubers or 'nuts'.

Growth habit is strongly rhizomatous and one new seedling can quickly establish a large colony by the end of the growing season soley through vegetative reproduction. Also highly resistant to readily availible herbicides like Roundup or Weed-B-Gone. Shading and prevention of tuber set in the fall seems to be the best control.