Echeveria
Echeveria 'Barbillion'

Family: Crassulaceae (krass-yoo-LAY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Echeveria (ech-eh-VER-ee-a) (Info)
Cultivar: Barbillion

Category:

Tropicals and Tender Perennials

Cactus and Succulents

Foliage Color:

Silver/Gray

Blue-Green

Bloom Characteristics:

Unknown - Tell us

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Where to Grow:

Suitable for growing in containers

Height:

under 6 in. (15 cm)

6-12 in. (15-30 cm)

Spacing:

12-15 in. (30-38 cm)

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 C (25 F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 C (30 F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 C (35 F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 C (40 F)

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Sun to Partial Shade

Light Shade

Danger:

N/A

Bloom Color:

Pink

Orange

Bloom Time:

Mid Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Evergreen

Succulent

Rubbery-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

Unknown - Tell us

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

By dividing rhizomes, tubers, corms or bulbs (including offsets)

Seed Collecting:

Unknown - Tell us

Regional

This plant has been said to grow in the following regions:

Bonsall, California

Brentwood, California

Reseda, California

San Leandro, California

Vista, California

Gardeners' Notes:

2
positives
0
neutrals
0
negatives
RatingContent
Positive

On Oct 6, 2010, thistlesifter from Vista, CA wrote:

This is one of the easiest and most durable of all Echeveria hybrids developed by Dick Wright, the master! He has created hundreds of these. Many are never seen outside his nursery as he destroys the ones that are not worthy.

Barbillon like many of these plants is easiest to propagate by not completely dead heading the plant. By cutting the center from the head one can preserve the most beautiful leaves from the center stem and the plant left on the stem will create faster and more plentifully the new plants that grow from offsets.

Cored head is allowed to callous in a warm shady dry place with bright light. The head should rest on dry organic potting mix after it has calloused. Within a few days or weeks, whichever comes first tiny optic-fiber-like air roots... read more

Positive

On Jul 16, 2006, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

This Echeveria hybrid is one of the many popular Dick Wright creations. In my opinion this is one of the very best. It has incredible colors that change throughout the year, though primarily it is turquoise with a hint of pink and purple here and there. The leaves are huge, slightly arching, rubbery things that have a caruncular deformity along much of the dorsal surface, but not to the tips or sides. The ends of the leaves have a nice wave to them and usually have a pink-orange margin. I used to call this my Echeveria neoplastic/warty until I learned what hybrid it was. There are a lot of caruncular hybrids, but this is a particularly large one in which most of the leaf is affected. It eventually gets tall and leggy and flowers, at which point it looks a bit less ornamental, and ei... read more