Photo by Melody

PlantFiles: Stretchberry
Forestiera pubescens var. glabrifolia

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Family: Oleaceae (oh-lee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Forestiera (for-es-STEER-uh) (Info)
Species: pubescens var. glabrifolia

Category:
Shrubs
Trees

Height:
10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:
Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:
Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:
Full Sun

Danger:
Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:
Chartreuse (Yellow-Green)

Bloom Time:
Mid Spring
Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:
Grown for foliage
Deciduous
Smooth-Textured

Other details:
This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds
Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping
Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Soil pH requirements:
5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)
5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)
6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)
6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)
7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)
7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:
Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:
From semi-hardwood cuttings
From hardwood cuttings
From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall
From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse
From seed; sow indoors before last frost
From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:
Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed; clean and dry seeds

Profile:

No positives
1 neutral
No negatives

Gardeners' Notes:

RatingAuthorContent
Neutral htop On Jan 26, 2009, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

I have not grown this plant. Stretchberry (Forestiera pubescens var. glabrifolia) is native to New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas in the USA. It is also commonly known as smooth-leaf forestiera, elbow-bush, spring-herald, stretch-berry, devilís elbow, and chaparral. The small blooms which are bisexual appear before the plant leafs out in spring. The purple or black, elliptic drupes( fruit) is edible. Children sometimes chew the berries along with regular gum in order to produce a bubble gum type effect.

"Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame [200 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press 1992]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.

Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame [11 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray 1981; 200 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press 1992]. Easy.

Cuttings of mature wood, November to February in a frame or sheltered outdoor bed."

Quote from Plants For A Future, 1996-2008 Copyrighted which lists the numbered references - I inserted the references themselves as provided under the Creative Commons License cited on the Plants for a Future web page.



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