Stretchberry
Forestiera pubescens var. glabrifolia

Family: Oleaceae (oh-lee-AY-see-ee) (Info)
Genus: Forestiera (for-es-STEER-uh) (Info)
Species: pubescens var. glabrifolia

Category:

Shrubs

Trees

Foliage Color:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Characteristics:

This plant is attractive to bees, butterflies and/or birds

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant; suitable for xeriscaping

Average Water Needs; Water regularly; do not overwater

Where to Grow:

Unknown - Tell us

Height:

10-12 ft. (3-3.6 m)

Spacing:

Unknown - Tell us

Hardiness:

Unknown - Tell us

Sun Exposure:

Full Sun

Danger:

Unknown - Tell us

Bloom Color:

Chartreuse (Yellow-Green)

Bloom Time:

Mid Spring

Late Spring/Early Summer

Foliage:

Grown for foliage

Deciduous

Smooth-Textured

Other details:

Unknown - Tell us

Soil pH requirements:

5.1 to 5.5 (strongly acidic)

5.6 to 6.0 (acidic)

6.1 to 6.5 (mildly acidic)

6.6 to 7.5 (neutral)

7.6 to 7.8 (mildly alkaline)

7.9 to 8.5 (alkaline)

Patent Information:

Unknown - Tell us

Propagation Methods:

From semi-hardwood cuttings

From hardwood cuttings

From seed; direct sow outdoors in fall

From seed; winter sow in vented containers, coldframe or unheated greenhouse

From seed; sow indoors before last frost

From seed; direct sow after last frost

Seed Collecting:

Unblemished fruit must be significantly overripe before harvesting seed; clean and dry seeds

Gardeners' Notes:

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RatingContent
Neutral

On Jan 26, 2009, htop from San Antonio, TX (Zone 8b) wrote:

I have not grown this plant. Stretchberry (Forestiera pubescens var. glabrifolia) is native to New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas in the USA. It is also commonly known as smooth-leaf forestiera, elbow-bush, spring-herald, stretch-berry, devilís elbow, and chaparral. The small blooms which are bisexual appear before the plant leafs out in spring. The purple or black, elliptic drupes( fruit) is edible. Children sometimes chew the berries along with regular gum in order to produce a bubble gum type effect.

"Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame [200 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press 1992]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their f... read more